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I am experiencing a very strange issue using gcc-4.7 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.2-11precise2) 4.7.2. I am unable to compile the following valid code without a warning:

extern void dostuff(void);

int test(int arg1, int arg2)
{
    int ret;

    if (arg1) ret = arg2 ? 1 : 2;

    dostuff();

    if (arg1) return ret;

    return 0;
}

Compile options and output:

$ gcc-4.7 -o test.o -c -Os test.c -Wall
test.c: In function ‘test’:
test.c:5:6: warning: ‘ret’ may be used uninitialized in this function [-Wmaybe-uninitialized]

However, the following code compiles with no warning (albeit to slightly less efficient assembly):

extern void dostuff(void);

int test(int arg1, int arg2)
{
    int ret;

    if (arg1 && arg2) ret = 1;
    if (arg1 && !arg2) ret = 2;

    dostuff();

    if (arg1) return ret;

    return 0;
}

I am somewhat stuck and am considering this a compiler bug. Any thoughts?

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You probably mean ret == arg2 ? 1 : 2;?? –  Alok Save Jan 3 '13 at 4:12
    
No, the syntax is fine. I mean return 0 if arg1=0, arg2=0, return 1 if arg1=1, arg2=1, return 2 if arg1=1, arg2=0. This snippet is a simplified case of a much larger issue I'm having. –  user593062 Jan 3 '13 at 4:14
    
Making ret volatile also resolves the issue, but isn't really ideal. –  user593062 Jan 3 '13 at 4:15
    
int ret; does not mean ret == 0, If you change int ret = 0; that should solve your issue and fit correctly in your logic as well. The code what you have at present, doesn't initialize ret to 0.ret has an Indeterminate value since it is local/auto variable which is not explicitly initialized.But that doesn't answer the underlying anomaly. –  Alok Save Jan 3 '13 at 4:17
1  
Thanks Alok, but possibly this constructed example will produce misguided solutions. Code density is extremely important here, and in the actual function ret is a large array which I don't want to initialize if it is not used. Looking at my first program, ret is indeed never used uninitialized, so the warning is incorrect, no? –  user593062 Jan 3 '13 at 4:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Indeed this is a known problem in gcc.
gcc is notorious for reporting incorrect uninitialized variables.
The shortcomings have been duly noted and there is a initiative to overcome the shortcomings:
Better Uninitialized Warnings:

The GNU Compiler Collection warns about the use of uninitialized variables with the option -Wuninitialized. However, the current implementation has some perceived shortcomings. On one hand, some users would like more verbose and consistent warnings. On the other hand, some users would like to get as few warnings as possible. The goal of this project is to implement both possibilities while at the same time improving the current capabilities.

The initiative aims at providing better warnings and it quotes a example case similar as your case. The relevant portion being:

What an user understands as a false positive may be different for the particular user. Some users are interested in cases that are hidden because of actions of the optimizers combined with the current environment. However, many users aren't, since that case is hidden because it cannot arise in the compiled code. The canonical example is

int x;
if (f ())
     x = 3;
return x;

where 'f' always return non-zero for the current environment, and thus, it may be optimized away. Here, a group of users would like to get an uninitialized warning since 'f' may return zero when compiled elsewhere. Yet, other group of users would consider spurious a warning about a situation that cannot arise in the executable being compiled.

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