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How can I make this function reliably cast sourceValue to type T where sourceValue is bool and T is int?

public static T ConvertTo<T>(Object sourceValue)
{
  // IF IS OF THE SAME TYPE --> RETURN IMMEDIATELY
  if (sourceValue is T)
    return (T) sourceValue;

  var val = ConvertTo(sourceValue, typeof (T));
  return (T) val; 
}

Currently, this throws an InvalidCastException when trying to convert false to 0 and true to 1. The types are not predefined, which is why generics must be used here. However, the only case where it fails is when T:Int32 and sourceValue:Boolean.

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1  
Just curious, but why do you want to use a standalone method for this? If b is a bool, just do int x = b ? 1 : 0;. –  bcat Sep 11 '09 at 21:21
    
I think he's looking for a generic solution, but this "edge" case won't fit. –  spender Sep 11 '09 at 21:23
    
Probably. I just can't see a use-case for a generic conversion method. I'm not saying there isn't a valid one, I just can't think of it at the moment. –  bcat Sep 11 '09 at 21:26
2  
Your code as it stands doesn't even compile. Is there a second overload of your ConvertTo method that you haven't posted? –  LukeH Sep 11 '09 at 21:35
    
you can't use foo is bar if "bar" is a value type. is only works on reference types –  Isak Savo Feb 3 '10 at 8:07

5 Answers 5

Is false=0 and true=1? Maybe in other languages, but here the cast makes no sense. If you really need this, I think it's a special case.

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+1 this does not seem to warrent generics, if the types are predefined. –  Adriaan Stander Sep 11 '09 at 21:23
1  
Convert.ToInt32 does exactly that - converts false to 0 and true to 1. I guess it does make sense. –  Kobi Sep 11 '09 at 21:46
    
The types are not predefined, which is why generics must be used here. However, the only case where it fails is when T:Int32 and sourceValue:Boolean. –  Mark Richman Sep 11 '09 at 22:38

I would think converting a bool to an int is undefined. However, I don't believe its appropriate to write out that special case explicitly in your function either, otherwise your function is incongruent with the way .NET implicitly treats ints and bools.

You're best off writing:

int value = someFlag ? 1 : 0;
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Not entirely sure what you're trying to do, but .net does support conversion of bool to int:

Convert.ToInt32(true);

It can also take an object, and figure out if it's a bool.
See also: Convert.ToInt32(bool), Convert.ToInt32(Object)

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I needed a highly generic solution. This is the best I could come up with:

public static T ConvertTo(Object sourceValue)
    {
      // IF IS OF THE SAME TYPE --> RETURN IMMEDIATELY
      if (sourceValue is T)
        return (T) sourceValue;

      var val = ConvertTo(sourceValue, typeof (T));

      // SPECIAL CASE: Convert bool(sourceValue) to int(T)
      if (val is bool)
      {
        var b = (bool) val;
        if (b)
          return (T) (object) 1; // if val is true, return 1

        return (T) (object) 0;
      }

      return (T) val;
    }
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1  
@Mark: This doesn't compile, the same as the original example in your question. Both examples call another overload of the ConvertTo method that you're not showing us. If you give us code that we can actually compile and test then I'm sure that somebody will be able to help out. –  LukeH Sep 11 '09 at 23:18
    
Could somebody please downvote for the reason Luke gives. I don't have enough rep. –  Kris Adams Jul 2 at 9:37
    
@KrisAdams Reason? –  Mark Richman Jul 2 at 13:30
    
For the reason Luke gave. It doesn't compile, therefore isn't a valid answer. If someone comes with the exact question as you did at the start, this would not be a valid answer. –  Kris Adams Jul 3 at 10:52

As a follow-up to Mark's own answer. I think this is a decent solution:

        protected Nullable<T> ConvertTo<T>(Object sourceValue) where T : struct, IComparable
    {
        if (sourceValue is T)
            return (T)sourceValue;

        if (sourceValue == null)
        {
            return null;
        }
        try
        {
            var val = Convert.ChangeType(sourceValue, typeof(T));
            return (T)val;
        }
        catch (FormatException)
        {
            return null;
        }

    }
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I no longer need to solve this problem, but if someone can verify that this code compiles, I'll mark this as the answer. –  Mark Richman Jul 3 at 15:30

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