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I am on my way learning Java multithread programming. I have a following logic:

Suppose I have a class A

class A {
    ConcurrentMap<K, V> map;

    public void someMethod1 () {
        // operation 1 on map
        // operation 2 on map
    }

    public void someMethod2 () {
        // operation 3 on map
        // operation 4 on map
    }
}

Now I don't need synchronization of the operations in "someMethod1" or "someMethod2". This means if there are two threads calling "someMethod1" at the same time, I don't need to serialize these operations (because the ConcurrentMap will do the job).

But I hope "someMethod1" and "someMethod2" are mutex of each other, which means when some thread is executing "someMethod1", another thread should wait to enter "someMethod2" (but another thread should be allowed to enter "someMethod1").

So, in short, is there a way that I can make "someMethod1" and "someMethod2" not mutex of themselves but mutex of each other?

I hope I stated my question clear enough...

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Just to confirm, it's okay if two threads A and B execute method1 concurrently? So for instance, A: operation1; A: operation2; B: operation1; B: operation2 is just as acceptable as A: operation1; B: operation1; B: operation2; A: operation2? –  yshavit Jan 3 '13 at 6:11
    
@yshavit yes, that's what I meant. –  shou3301 Jan 3 '13 at 6:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I tried a couple attempts with higher-level constructs, but nothing quite came to mind. I think this may be an occasion to drop down to the low level APIs:

EDIT: I actually think you're trying to set up a problem which is inherently tricky (see second to last paragraph) and probably not needed (see last paragraph). But that said, here's how it could be done, and I'll leave the color commentary for the end of this answer.

private int someMethod1Invocations = 0;
private int someMethod2Invocations = 0;

public void someMethod1() {
    synchronized(this) {
        // Wait for there to be no someMethod2 invocations -- but
        // don't wait on any someMethod1 invocations.
        // Once all someMethod2s are done, increment someMethod1Invocations
        // to signify that we're running, and proceed
        while (someMethod2Invocations > 0)
            wait();
        someMethod1Invocations++;
    }

    // your code here

    synchronized (this) {
        // We're done with this method, so decrement someMethod1Invocations
        // and wake up any threads that were waiting for that to hit 0.
        someMethod1Invocations--;
        notifyAll();
    }
}

public void someMethod2() {
    // comments are all ditto the above
    synchronized(this) {
        while (someMethod1Invocations > 0)
            wait();
        someMethod2Invocations++;
    }

    // your code here
    synchronized(this) {
        someMethod2Invocations--;
        notifyAll();
    }
}

One glaring problem with the above is that it can lead to thread starvation. For instance, someMethod1() is running (and blocking someMethod2()s), and just as it's about to finish, another thread comes along and invokes someMethod1(). That proceeds just fine, and just as it finishes another thread starts someMethod1(), and so on. In this scenario, someMethod2() will never get a chance to run. That's actually not directly a bug in the above code; it's a problem with your very design needs, one which a good solution should actively work to solve. I think a fair AbstractQueuedSynchronizer could do the trick, though that is an exercise left to the reader. :)

Finally, I can't resist but to interject an opinion: given that ConcurrentHashMap operations are pretty darn quick, you could be better off just putting a single mutex around both methods and just being done with it. So yes, threads will have to queue up to invoke someMethod1(), but each thread will finish its turn (and thus let other threads proceed) extremely quickly. It shouldn't be a problem.

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+1 I don't think there is a way to get around it with Semaphores only... –  assylias Jan 3 '13 at 7:27
    
Thanks for your answer! –  shou3301 Jan 3 '13 at 16:51

I think this should work

class A {
    Lock lock = new Lock();

    private static class Lock {
        int m1;
        int m2;
    }

    public void someMethod1() throws InterruptedException {
        synchronized (lock) {
            while (lock.m2 > 0) {
                lock.wait();
            }
            lock.m1++;
        }

        // someMethod1 and someMethod2 cannot be here simultaneously

        synchronized (lock) {
            lock.m1--;
            lock.notifyAll();
        }
    }

    public void someMethod2() throws InterruptedException {
        synchronized (lock) {
            while (lock.m1 > 0) {
                lock.wait();
            }
            lock.m2++;
        }

        // someMethod1 and someMethod2 cannot be here simultaneously

        synchronized (lock) {
            lock.m2--;
            lock.notifyAll();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This probably can't work (see comments) - leaving it for information.


One way would be to use Semaphores:

  • one semaphore sem1, with one permit, linked to method1
  • one semaphore sem2, with one permit, linked to method2

when entering method1, try to acquire sem2's permit, and if available release it immediately.

See this post for an implementation example.

Note: in your code, even if ConcurrentMap is thread safe, operation 1 and operation 2 (for example) are not atomic - so it is possible in your scenario to have the following interleaving:

  • Thread 1 runs operation 1
  • Thread 2 runs operation 1
  • Thread 2 runs operation 2
  • Thread 1 runs operation 2
share|improve this answer
1  
Isn't the solution you link to a bit racy? For instance, a() acquires the sem, then b() tries and fails to grab it, then a() releases it -- and now both threads simultaneously execute their //rest of your code sections, followed by b() not releasing the sem (since it never acquired it to begin with). Meanwhile, a third thread comes in and enters a(), which it's allowed to do since b() never acquired the sem. –  yshavit Jan 3 '13 at 6:30
2  
@yshavit I see what you mean. You are right. Will edit the other post. –  assylias Jan 3 '13 at 6:37

First of all : Your map is thread safe as its ConcurrentMap. This means that operations on this map like add,contains etc are thread safe.

Secondaly This doesn't guarantee that even your methods (somemethod1 and somemethod2) are also thread safe. So your methods are not mutually exclusive and two threads at same time can access them.

Now you want these to be mutex of each other : One approach could be put all operations (operaton 1,..operation 4) in a single method and based on condition call each.

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I think you cannot do this without a custom synchronizer. I've whipped up this, I called it TrafficLight since it allows threads with a particular state to pass while halting others, until it changes state:

public class TrafficLight<T> {

    private final int maxSequence;
    private final ReentrantLock lock = new ReentrantLock(true);
    private final Condition allClear = lock.newCondition();
    private int registered;
    private int leftInSequence;
    private T openState;

    public TrafficLight(int maxSequence) {
        this.maxSequence = maxSequence;
    }

    public void acquire(T state) throws InterruptedException {
        lock.lock();
        try {
            while ((this.openState != null && !this.openState.equals(state)) || leftInSequence == maxSequence) {
                allClear.await();
            }
            if (this.openState == null) {
                this.openState = state;
            }
            registered++;
            leftInSequence++;
        } finally {
            lock.unlock();
        }
    }

    public void release() {
        lock.lock();
        try {
            registered--;
            if (registered == 0) {
                openState = null;
                leftInSequence = 0;
                allClear.signalAll();
            }
        } finally {
            lock.unlock();
        }
    }
}

acquire() will block if another state is active, until it becomes inactive.

The maxSequence is there to help prevent thread starvation, allowing only a maximum number of threads to pass in sequence (then they'll have to queue like the others). You could make a variant that uses a time window instead.

For your problem someMethod1() and someMethod2() would call acquire() with a different state each at the start, and release() at the end.

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