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I am working on a form widget for users to enter a time of day into a text input (for a calendar application). Using JavaScript (we are using jQuery FWIW), I want to find the best way to parse the text that the user enters into a JavaScript Date() object so I can easily perform comparisons and other things on it.

I tried the parse() method and it is a little too picky for my needs. I would expect it to be able to successfully parse the following example input times (in addition to other logically similar time formats) as the same Date() object:

  • 1:00 pm
  • 1:00 p.m.
  • 1:00 p
  • 1:00pm
  • 1:00p.m.
  • 1:00p
  • 1 pm
  • 1 p.m.
  • 1 p
  • 1pm
  • 1p.m.
  • 1p
  • 13:00
  • 13

I am thinking that I might use regular expressions to split up the input and extract the information I want to use to create my Date() object. What is the best way to do this?

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13 Answers 13

up vote 56 down vote accepted

A quick solution which works on the input that you've specified:

var times = ['1:00 pm','1:00 p.m.','1:00 p','1:00pm',
  '1:00p.m.','1:00p','1 pm','1 p.m.','1 p','1pm','1p.m.', '1p','13:00','13'];

for ( var i = 0; i < times.length; i++ ) {
  var d = new Date();
  var time = times[i].match(/(\d+)(?::(\d\d))?\s*(p?)/);
  d.setHours( parseInt(time[1]) + (time[3] ? 12 : 0) );
  d.setMinutes( parseInt(time[2]) || 0 );
  console.log( d );
}

It should work for a few other varieties as well (even if a.m. is used, it'll still work - for example). Obviously this is pretty crude but it's also pretty lightweight (much cheaper to use that than a full library, for example).

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4  
After working with this, I noticed that it doesn't properly parse variants of the time "12 pm" because it adds 12 to the hours number. To fix, I changed the d.setHours line to read: d.setHours( parseInt(time[1]) + ( ( parseInt(time[1]) < 12 && time[3] ) ? 12 : 0) ); –  Joe Lencioni Oct 29 '08 at 21:38
2  
I also noticed that parseInt was choking on strings like ':30' or ':00' so I changed the regex to capture the minutes without the colon –  Joe Lencioni Oct 31 '08 at 14:11
3  
Does this method parse 12:00am as 12:00pm? –  Ryan Apr 21 '10 at 5:20
5  
The calls to ParseInt need a radix of 10 because JS assumes a radix of 8 when there is a leading 0, resulting in the hour being interpreted as 0 if it is greater than 8 and has a leading 0 (because 08 isn't a valid base 8 number). Also, changing "p?" to "[pP]?" will make it work when AM/PM are upper case. All in all, unless you're really sure this approach will work for you, you should use a library. Remember, time hates us all. –  Benji York Aug 7 '10 at 15:05
3  
An alternative to using "[pP]" would be to append "i" to the end of the literal. That would make the match case-insensitive. –  Chris Miller May 19 '11 at 15:16

Don't bother doing it yourself, just use datejs.

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22  
25KB just to do dates?!?! I mean, nice library no doubt, and if I had to have psycho date handling functionality, it would be the one. But 25KB is larger than all of the core of jQuery!!! –  Jason Bunting Sep 26 '08 at 19:30
2  
Given the range of input you want to accept, I would go for datejs as well. It seems to handle most of them, apart from the one which is just a number, which it takes as the day of the month. –  insin Sep 26 '08 at 19:39
1  
I just had the same need, used Datejs. It was painless and effective. –  Corey Trager Oct 27 '08 at 11:22
1  
Huge +1! As for the size - actually it is 25KB per locale. But at least it supports locales! Instead of writing you own procedures, use what is available (or write a better library and share it). Also, while whitespace is stripped from JS, it doesn't look minified to me, so you might be able to save some bytes there. If it matters that much to you. –  johndodo Apr 20 '12 at 7:59
3  
I'm a human and I don't know what "12 wed 2020" means. There are multiple ways to interpret that. If I were to guess what DateJS was doing, I would say that it interpreted "12" as the day of the month and looked for the next Wednesday that fell on the 12th, which is in December. The only thing that surprised me was that it threw away "2020" instead of interpreting it as 8:20pm. –  Jim Oct 7 '12 at 16:22

All of the examples provided fail to work for times from 12:00 am to 12:59 am. They also throw an error if the regex does not match a time. The following handles this:

function parseTime(timeString) {    
    if (timeString == '') return null;

    var time = timeString.match(/(\d+)(:(\d\d))?\s*(p?)/i); 
    if (time == null) return null;

    var hours = parseInt(time[1],10);    
    if (hours == 12 && !time[4]) {
          hours = 0;
    }
    else {
        hours += (hours < 12 && time[4])? 12 : 0;
    }   
    var d = new Date();             
    d.setHours(hours);
    d.setMinutes(parseInt(time[3],10) || 0);
    d.setSeconds(0, 0);  
    return d;
}

This will work for strings which contain a time anywhere inside them. So "abcde12:00pmdef" would be parsed and return 12 pm. If the desired outcome is that it only returns a time when the string only contains a time in them the following regular expression can be used provided you replace "time[4]" with "time[6]".

/^(\d+)(:(\d\d))?\s*((a|(p))m?)?$/i
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this works perfectly and solves the problems I was having with the earlier answers. –  Tauren Feb 7 '10 at 21:15
    
Wow, this is great! Thanks! –  Chetan Apr 24 '11 at 1:25
1  
I would mark this as the correct answer if it was my question :) –  Chetan Apr 24 '11 at 1:26
2  
+1, only thing missing is '1030' for 10:30 am. –  Andrew Feb 9 '12 at 0:37
    
This is saa-weeeet. Thanks! –  Mike Campbell Oct 26 '12 at 12:59

Here's an improvement on Joe's version. Feel free to edit it further.

parseTime(timeString)
{
  if (timeString == '') return null;
  var d = new Date();
  var time = timeString.match(/(\d+)(:(\d\d))?\s*(p?)/i);
  d.setHours( parseInt(time[1],10) + ( ( parseInt(time[1],10) < 12 && time[4] ) ? 12 : 0) );
  d.setMinutes( parseInt(time[3],10) || 0 );
  d.setSeconds(0, 0);
  return d;
}

Changes:

  • Added radix parameter to the parseInt() calls (so jslint won't complain).
  • Made the regex case-insenstive so "2:23 PM" works like "2:23 pm"
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Most of the regex solutions here throw errors when the string can't be parsed, and not many of them account for strings like 1330 or 130pm. Even though these formats weren't specified by the OP, I find them critical for parsing dates input by humans.

All of this got me to thinking that using a regular expression might not be the best approach for this.

My solution is a function that not only parses the time, but also allows you to specify an output format and a step (interval) at which to round minutes to. At about 70 lines, it's still lightweight and parses all of the aforementioned formats as well as ones without colons.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/HwwzS/1/

Code: https://gist.github.com/claviska/4744736

And below in case the links break someday:

function parseTime(time, format, step) {

    var hour, minute, stepMinute,
        defaultFormat = 'g:ia',
        pm = time.match(/p/i) !== null,
        num = time.replace(/[^0-9]/g, '');

    // Parse for hour and minute
    switch(num.length) {
        case 4:
            hour = parseInt(num[0] + num[1], 10);
            minute = parseInt(num[2] + num[3], 10);
            break;
        case 3:
            hour = parseInt(num[0], 10);
            minute = parseInt(num[1] + num[2], 10);
            break;
        case 2:
        case 1:
            hour = parseInt(num[0] + (num[1] || ''), 10);
            minute = 0;
            break;
        default:
            return '';
    }

    // Make sure hour is in 24 hour format
    if( pm === true && hour > 0 && hour < 12 ) hour += 12;

    // Force pm for hours between 13:00 and 23:00
    if( hour >= 13 && hour <= 23 ) pm = true;

    // Handle step
    if( step ) {
        // Step to the nearest hour requires 60, not 0
        if( step === 0 ) step = 60;
        // Round to nearest step
        stepMinute = (Math.round(minute / step) * step) % 60;
        // Do we need to round the hour up?
        if( stepMinute === 0 && minute >= 30 ) {
            hour++;
            // Do we need to switch am/pm?
            if( hour === 12 || hour === 24 ) pm = !pm;
        }
        minute = stepMinute;
    }

    // Keep within range
    if( hour <= 0 || hour >= 24 ) hour = 0;
    if( minute < 0 || minute > 59 ) minute = 0;

    // Format output
    return (format || defaultFormat)
        // 12 hour without leading 0
        .replace(/g/g, hour === 0 ? '12' : 'g')
        .replace(/g/g, hour > 12 ? hour - 12 : hour)
        // 24 hour without leading 0
        .replace(/G/g, hour)
        // 12 hour with leading 0
        .replace(/h/g, hour.toString().length > 1 ? (hour > 12 ? hour - 12 : hour) : '0' + (hour > 12 ? hour - 12 : hour))
        // 24 hour with leading 0
        .replace(/H/g, hour.toString().length > 1 ? hour : '0' + hour)
        // minutes with leading zero
        .replace(/i/g, minute.toString().length > 1 ? minute : '0' + minute)
        // simulate seconds
        .replace(/s/g, '00')
        // lowercase am/pm
        .replace(/a/g, pm ? 'pm' : 'am')
        // lowercase am/pm
        .replace(/A/g, pm ? 'PM' : 'AM');

}
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1  
I had to mark this up. It's the only really useful answer when size matters. Most of the time I use momentjs but that's enormous compared to this solution. –  Peter Wone May 9 at 9:26
    
Bug report: "12am" parses the same as "12pm" –  dreeves Nov 6 at 1:36
    
@dreeves can you elaborate? codepen.io/claviska/pen/kIADE –  claviska Nov 6 at 15:43
    
"12am" parses to 12:00 (ie, noon) instead of 00:00 (ie, midnight). Same problem for any time between midnight and 12:59am. –  dreeves Nov 7 at 16:16

I came across a couple of kinks in implementing John Resig's solution. Here is the modified function that I have been using based on his answer:

function parseTime(timeString)
{
  if (timeString == '') return null;
  var d = new Date();
  var time = timeString.match(/(\d+)(:(\d\d))?\s*(p?)/);
  d.setHours( parseInt(time[1]) + ( ( parseInt(time[1]) < 12 && time[4] ) ? 12 : 0) );
  d.setMinutes( parseInt(time[3]) || 0 );
  d.setSeconds(0, 0);
  return d;
} // parseTime()
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This has the same bugs I noted in the highest-voted answer above. –  Benji York Aug 7 '10 at 15:07

Here's a solution more for all of those who are using a 24h clock:

function parseTime(text) {
  var time = text.match(/(\d?\d):?(\d?\d?)/);
    var h = parseInt(time[1], 10);
    var m = parseInt(time[2], 10) || 0;

    if (h > 24) {
        // try a different format
        time = text.match(/(\d)(\d?\d?)/);
        h = parseInt(time[1], 10);
        m = parseInt(time[2], 10) || 0;
    } 

  var d = new Date();
  d.setHours(h);
  d.setMinutes(m);
  return d;     
}

Note, that this function also supports parsing of strings like

  • 0820 -> 08:20
  • 32 -> 03:02
  • 124 -> 12:04
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This is a more rugged approach that takes into account how users intend to use this type of input. For example, if a user entered "12", they would expect it to be 12pm (noon), and not 12am. The below function handles all of this. It is also available here: http://blog.de-zwart.net/2010-02/javascript-parse-time/

/**
 * Parse a string that looks like time and return a date object.
 * @return  Date object on success, false on error.
 */
String.prototype.parseTime = function() {
    // trim it and reverse it so that the minutes will always be greedy first:
    var value = this.trim().reverse();

    // We need to reverse the string to match the minutes in greedy first, then hours
    var timeParts = value.match(/(a|p)?\s*((\d{2})?:?)(\d{1,2})/i);

    // This didnt match something we know
    if (!timeParts) {
        return false;
    }

    // reverse it:
    timeParts = timeParts.reverse();

    // Reverse the internal parts:
    for( var i = 0; i < timeParts.length; i++ ) {
        timeParts[i] = timeParts[i] === undefined ? '' : timeParts[i].reverse();
    }

    // Parse out the sections:
    var minutes = parseInt(timeParts[1], 10) || 0;
    var hours = parseInt(timeParts[0], 10);
    var afternoon = timeParts[3].toLowerCase() == 'p' ? true : false;

    // If meridian not set, and hours is 12, then assume afternoon.
    afternoon = !timeParts[3] && hours == 12 ? true : afternoon;
    // Anytime the hours are greater than 12, they mean afternoon
    afternoon = hours > 12 ? true : afternoon;
    // Make hours be between 0 and 12:
    hours -= hours > 12 ? 12 : 0;
    // Add 12 if its PM but not noon
    hours += afternoon && hours != 12 ? 12 : 0;
    // Remove 12 for midnight:
    hours -= !afternoon && hours == 12 ? 12 : 0;

    // Check number sanity:
    if( minutes >= 60 || hours >= 24 ) {
        return false;
    }

    // Return a date object with these values set.
    var d = new Date();
    d.setHours(hours);
    d.setMinutes(minutes);
    return d;
}

This is a string prototype, so you can use it like so:

var str = '12am';
var date = str.parseTime();
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AnyTime.Converter can parse dates/times in many different formats:

http://www.ama3.com/anytime/

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I should add: skip past the picker stuff at the top 3/4 of that page and look at the section on converting: ama3.com/anytime/#converting –  Andrew M. Andrews III May 4 '10 at 15:11

Why not use validation to narrow down what a user can put in and simplify the list to only include formats that can be parsed (or parsed after some tweaking).

I don't think it's asking too much to require a user to put a time in a supported format.

dd:dd A(m)/P(m)

dd A(m)/P(m)

dd

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, it really is not asking too much. It is, however, a bit of a hurdle for the user and I want to make this particular form as easy to use as is reasonable. Ideally, the input will be flexible enough to interpret what they typed in and reformat it to a standard format. –  Joe Lencioni Sep 26 '08 at 19:46

I have made some modifications to the function above to support a few more formats.

1400 -> 2:00 PM

1.30 -> 1:30 PM

1:30a -> 1:30 AM

100 -> 1:00 AM

Ain't cleaned it up yet but works for everything I can think of.

function parseTime(timeString) {
    if (timeString == '') return null;

    var time = timeString.match(/^(\d+)([:\.](\d\d))?\s*((a|(p))m?)?$/i);

    if (time == null) return null;

    var m = parseInt(time[3], 10) || 0;
    var hours = parseInt(time[1], 10);

    if (time[4]) time[4] = time[4].toLowerCase();

    // 12 hour time
    if (hours == 12 && !time[4]) {
        hours = 12;
    }
    else if (hours == 12 && (time[4] == "am" || time[4] == "a")) {
        hours += 12;
    }
    else if (hours < 12 && (time[4] != "am" && time[4] != "a")) {
        hours += 12;
    }
    // 24 hour time
    else if(hours > 24 && hours.toString().length >= 3) {
        if(hours.toString().length == 3) {
           m = parseInt(hours.toString().substring(1,3), 10);
           hours = parseInt(hours.toString().charAt(0), 10);
        }
        else if(hours.toString().length == 4) {
           m = parseInt(hours.toString().substring(2,4), 10);
           hours = parseInt(hours.toString().substring(0,2), 10);
        }
    }

    var d = new Date();
    d.setHours(hours);
    d.setMinutes(m);
    d.setSeconds(0, 0);
    return d;
}
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/(\d+)(?::(\d\d))(?::(\d\d))?\s*([pP]?)/ 

// added test for p or P
// added seconds

d.setHours( parseInt(time[1]) + (time[4] ? 12 : 0) ); // care with new indexes
d.setMinutes( parseInt(time[2]) || 0 );
d.setSeconds( parseInt(time[3]) || 0 );

thanks

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An improvement to Patrick McElhaney's solution (his does not handle 12am correctly)

var d = new Date();
var time = timeString.match(/(\d+)(:(\d\d))?\s*([pP]?)/i);
var h = parseInt(time[1], 10);
if (time[4])
{
    if (h < 12)
        h += 12;
}
else if (h == 12)
    h = 0;
d.setHours(h);
d.setMinutes(parseInt(time[3], 10) || 0);
d.setSeconds(0, 0);
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