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I want to do a check (if statement) and then create one of two possible procedures.

Right now I am trying to use a IF EXISTS statement inside a CREATE PROCEDURE statement.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[TestProc]
AS

SET NOCOUNT ON
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF

IF EXISTS (select * from table)
BEGIN
DECLARE @region NVARCHAR(100)

SELECT *
INTO #TempTable
FROM User

...do something with #TempTable etc..

DROP #TempTable
END

ELSE
BEGIN
DECLARE @region NVARCHAR(100)

SELECT *
INTO #TempTable
FROM User

...do something else with #TempTable etc

DROP #TempTable
END

I get the following 2 errors

There is already an object named 'TempTable' in the database.

The variable name '@region' has already been declared. Variable names must be unique within a query batch or stored procedure.
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

1.You need use two different temp table and before SELECT * INTO statements DROP them

2.Variable need once declared in the body procedure. In your case before IF EXISTS

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[TestProc]
AS
SET NOCOUNT ON
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF

DECLARE @region NVARCHAR(100)

IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM dbo.test6)
BEGIN
  IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb.dbo.#TempTable') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE dbo.#TempTable
  SELECT *
  INTO #TempTable
  FROM dbo.test6
END
ELSE
BEGIN
  IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb.dbo.#TempTable2') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE dbo.#TempTable2
  SELECT *
  INTO #TempTable2
  FROM dbo.test6
END
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Either a) Create the temp table first in the stored procedure, then use INSERT INTO (...) SELECT ... to populate it, or b) Use a different name for the temp table in the two branches.

The T-SQL parser is a remarkably simple beast, and control flow doesn't affect its interpretation of which objects exist or not - so if you declare a temp table in one branch of an IF, you can't declare it separately in the other branch - it "exists" whether the control flow enters the IF branch or not.

A Similar argument applies for variables.

Obviously, option a only works if the temp table structures are identical.


Simple example of how control flow is ignored:

if 1=2
begin
    declare @a int
end

set @a = 5

print @a

prints 5. Just:

set @a = 5

print @a

produces the error Must declare the scalar variable "@a"., which demonstrates that the declaration (inside the un-followed branch of if) still took effect.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice example –  Ivan G Jan 3 '13 at 9:04

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