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I'm trying to animate some elements on my page. One of the properties I need to animate is bottom, however, I also need to be able to reposition the element without it animating, that's why I added a seperate class to it: .anim

.slideshow_footer {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    color: #fff
}
.slideshow_footer.anim {
    -webkit-transition:bottom 0.3s ease-out;
    -moz-transition:bottom 0.3s ease-out;
    -o-transition:bottom 0.3s ease-out;
    -ms-transition:bottom 0.3s ease-out;
    transition:bottom 0.3s ease-out;
}

In my Javascript, I do the following:

var footer = $('#footer');
// do some magic with the footer
// ...
// ...
setCss(footer, 'bottom', -100); // position it so it's hidden, this should be immediate
addClass(footer, 'anim'); // add the animation class
setCss(footer, 'bottom', ); // animate the footer sliding in

Note that I'm not using jQuery or anything, it's an inhouse javascript framework.

I have found a workaround that solves the problem, but it's extremely ugly:

var footer = $('#footer');
// do some magic with the footer
// ...
// ...
setCss(footer, 'bottom', -100); // position it so it's hidden, this should be immediate
addClass(footer, 'anim'); // add the animation class
setTimeout(function() {
    setCss(footer, 'bottom', ); // animate the footer sliding in
}, 0); // even no timeout works...

Can anyone explain to me what is happening and how this should best be solved? Possibly changing the addClass and setCss functions?

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What's in your addClass and setCss functions? –  Cerbrus Jan 3 '13 at 8:19
    
addClass and setCss are basic wrapper functions that have similar functionality to jQuery. They do what it says on the tin: they add a class to an element (checking if it's not already there) and setCss sets the style of an element (if possible, it has a few if's to catch some exceptions). –  Bram Jan 3 '13 at 8:24
    
I kinda guessed as much, but I was hoping to find some kind of "delay" in the setCss function :P –  Cerbrus Jan 3 '13 at 8:32
1  
The browser doesn't update the visible HTML until the entire JavaScript is done. If it did, setting "right" after "bottom" would move the element twice. From the perspective of the browser, the element instantly gains both "anim" and bottom undefined (?). setTimeout with 0 timeout tells the browser to execute the code as soon as possible, but not in the same round of JavaScript. Id say you workaround is perfectly OK. –  Odalrick Jan 3 '13 at 8:38
1  
I agree with @Odalrick. Your workaround is not even close to "ugly", it's actually adopted by many people as an "asynchronous" way to run codes. –  Passerby Jan 3 '13 at 8:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To answer my own question:

Using a timeOut is the correct approach.

The browser doesn't update the visible HTML until the entire JavaScript is done. If it did, setting "right" after "bottom" would move the element twice. From the perspective of the browser, the element instantly gains both "anim" and bottom 0. setTimeout with 0 timeout tells the browser to execute the code as soon as possible, but not in the same round of JavaScript.

The workaround is actually adopted by many people as an "asynchronous" way to run codes

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