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I'm trying to get the number of minutes between two particular time instances by ignoring weekends. This is what I've done.

public static final List<Integer> NON_WORKING_DAYS;
static {
    List<Integer> nonWorkingDays = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    nonWorkingDays.add(Calendar.SATURDAY);
    nonWorkingDays.add(Calendar.SUNDAY);
    NON_WORKING_DAYS = Collections.unmodifiableList(nonWorkingDays);
}

public static int getMinsBetween(Date d1, Date d2, boolean onlyBusinessDays)
{
    int minsBetween = (int)((d2.getTime() - d1.getTime()) / (1000 * 60));
    int minsToSubtract = 0;
    if(onlyBusinessDays){
        Calendar dateToCheck = Calendar.getInstance();
        dateToCheck.setTime(d1);
        Calendar dateToCompare = Calendar.getInstance();
        dateToCompare.setTime(d2);


        //moving the first day of the week to Tues so that a Sat, sun and mon fall in the same week, easy to adjust dates
        dateToCheck.setFirstDayOfWeek(Calendar.TUESDAY);
        dateToCompare.setFirstDayOfWeek(Calendar.TUESDAY);

        //moving the dates out of weekends
        if(!isBusinessDay(dateToCheck, NON_WORKING_DAYS)){
            dateToCheck.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.SATURDAY);
            dateToCheck.set(Calendar.HOUR, 0);
            dateToCheck.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
            dateToCheck.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
            dateToCheck.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
        }

        if(!isBusinessDay(dateToCompare, NON_WORKING_DAYS)){
            dateToCompare.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.MONDAY);
            dateToCompare.set(Calendar.HOUR, 0);
            dateToCompare.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
            dateToCompare.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
            dateToCompare.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
        }

        for(; dateToCheck.getTimeInMillis() < dateToCompare.getTimeInMillis() ; dateToCheck.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 1)){
            if(isBusinessDay(dateToCheck, NON_WORKING_DAYS)){
                minsToSubtract = minsToSubtract + 1440;
            }
        }
    minsBetween = minsBetween - minsToSubtract; 
    }
    return minsBetween;
}


private static boolean isBusinessDay(Calendar dateToCheck, List<Integer> daysToExclude){
    for(Integer dayToExclude : daysToExclude){
        if(dayToExclude != null && dayToExclude == dateToCheck.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK)) {
            return true; 
        }
        else continue;
    }
    return false;
}

Can someone tell me if my logic is correct and if not how to do this? I'm not too sure how this code would behave when the month changes over the weekend.

Expected output for some test cases:

  1. Friday 6 pm, Monday 6 am - should return 12 hours
  2. Saturday 12 pm, Sunday 12 pm - should return 0 hours
  3. Saturday 12 pm, Monday 6 am - should return 6 hours
share|improve this question
    
Did you test it? Was the result as expected? –  Andy Jan 3 '13 at 8:53
    
hi guys .. have added isBusinessDay method. –  Arvind Sridharan Jan 3 '13 at 9:05
    
this is what i expect... if the start time is sometime on saturday or sunday, then the start time should rollback to saturday 12:00AM. if the end time is somewhere in saturday or sunday, then it should change to monday morning 12:00 AM so that the 2880 mins of the weekend are excluded completly. –  Arvind Sridharan Jan 3 '13 at 9:07
    
@Andy - have not tested it ... i feel there is something missing in my logic which is why i've posted it here. –  Arvind Sridharan Jan 3 '13 at 9:07
    
A few test cases would help: Show what output you would expect for several input cases. And I would highly recommend using JodaTime for problems like these, it provides a lot of helpful functions like adding a day to a date and getting date differences. –  Katja Christiansen Jan 3 '13 at 9:25
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2 Answers

I would highly recommend using JodaTime for anything concerning date manipulations in Java, because it comes with a lot of helpful functions to make the code less complicated.

This code uses JodaTime:

public static final List<Integer> NON_WORKING_DAYS;
static {
    List<Integer> nonWorkingDays = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    nonWorkingDays.add(DateTimeConstants.SATURDAY);
    nonWorkingDays.add(DateTimeConstants.SUNDAY);
    NON_WORKING_DAYS = Collections.unmodifiableList(nonWorkingDays);
}

public static Minutes getMinsBetween(DateTime d1, DateTime d2,
        boolean onlyBusinessDays) {

    BaseDateTime startDate = onlyBusinessDays && !isBusinessDay(d1) ?
                new DateMidnight(d1) : d1;
    BaseDateTime endDate = onlyBusinessDays && !isBusinessDay(d2) ?
                new DateMidnight(d2) : d2;

    Minutes minutes = Minutes.minutesBetween(startDate, endDate);

    if (onlyBusinessDays) {
        DateTime d = new DateTime(startDate);

        while (d.isBefore(endDate)) {
            if (!isBusinessDay(d)) {
                Duration dayDuration = new Duration(d, d.plusDays(1));
                minutes = minutes.minus(int) dayDuration.getStandardMinutes());
            }
            d = d.plusDays(1);
        }
    }
    return minutes;
}

private static boolean isBusinessDay(DateTime dateToCheck) {
    return !NON_WORKING_DAYS.contains(dateToCheck.dayOfWeek().get());
}

When this code is tested, it gives the following results:

DateTime d1 = new DateTime(2013, 1, 4, 18, 0); // a Friday, 6 pm
DateTime d2 = new DateTime(2013, 1, 7, 6, 0);  // the following Monday, 6 am

Minutes minutes = getMinsBetween(d1, d2, true);
System.out.println(minutes.toStandardHours().getHours()); // outputs "12" (in hours)

d1 = new DateTime(2013, 1, 5, 12, 0); // a Saturday, 12 pm
d2 = new DateTime(2013, 1, 6, 12, 0); // the following Sunday, 12 pm

minutes = getMinsBetween(d1, d2, true);
System.out.println(minutes.toStandardHours().getHours()); // outputs "0" (in hours)

d1 = new DateTime(2013, 1, 5, 12, 0); // a Saturday, 12 pm
d2 = new DateTime(2013, 1, 7, 6, 0);  // the following Monday, 6 am

minutes = getMinsBetween(d1, d2, true);
System.out.println(minutes.toStandardHours().getHours()); // outputs "6" (in hours)

I just tested a case where the month changes over the weekend: From Friday, March 29th (6pm) to Monday, April 1st (6am):

d1 = new DateTime(2013, 3, 29, 18, 0);
d2 = new DateTime(2013, 4, 1, 6, 0);

minutes = getMinsBetween(d1, d2, true);
System.out.println(minutes.toStandardHours().getHours());

The result is 12 hours, so it works for the month change.

[Update:]
My first solution wasn't handling daylight savin times correctly. We have to determine the duration of each actual day when subtracting the minutes because days with a change in daylight saving time will not be 24h:

if (!isBusinessDay(d)) {
    Duration dayDuration = new Duration(d, d.plusDays(1));
    minutes = minutes.minus(int) dayDuration.getStandardMinutes());
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks ... will try it out and get back to you. –  Arvind Sridharan Jan 3 '13 at 11:27
    
@ArvindSridharan I corrected the code. It now works for time periods including daylight saving changes. –  Katja Christiansen Jan 3 '13 at 11:50
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JodaTime is the way to go, so @KatjaChristiansen is on the right track. If you need to use the Java Calendar, my solution would look like this:

private static final long MILLIS_OF_WEEK = TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(7);
private static final long MILLIS_OF_WORKWEEK = TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(5);

public static int getMinsBetween(Date d1, Date d2, boolean onlyBusinessDays) {
    long duration = d2.getTime() - d1.getTime();
    if (onlyBusinessDays) {
        Date sat = toSaturdayMidnight(d1);
        long timeBeforeWeekend = Math.max(sat.getTime() - d1.getTime(), 0);
        if (duration > timeBeforeWeekend) {
            Date mon = toMondayMidnight(d2);
            long timeAfterWeekend = Math.max(d2.getTime() - mon.getTime(), 0);
            long numberOfWeekends = Math.max((duration / MILLIS_OF_WEEK) - 1, 0);
            duration = numberOfWeekends * MILLIS_OF_WORKWEEK + timeBeforeWeekend + timeAfterWeekend;
        }
    }
    return (int) TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(duration);
}

private static Date toMondayMidnight(Date date) {
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.setTime(date);
    switch (cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK)) {
        case Calendar.SATURDAY:
        case Calendar.SUNDAY:
            cal.add(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, 7);
    }
    cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.MONDAY);
    toMidnight(cal);
    return cal.getTime();
}

private static Date toSaturdayMidnight(Date date) {
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    cal.setTime(date);
    cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK, Calendar.SATURDAY);
    toMidnight(cal);
    return cal.getTime();
}

private static void toMidnight(Calendar cal) {
    cal.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, 0);
    cal.set(Calendar.MINUTE, 0);
    cal.set(Calendar.SECOND, 0);
    cal.set(Calendar.MILLISECOND, 0);
}

These tests pass:

@Test
public void testWithinSameDay() {
    assertMinsBetween(30, "2013-01-03 9:00", "2013-01-03 9:30");
}
@Test
public void testOverWeekend() {
    assertMinsBetween(60, "2013-01-04 23:30", "2013-01-07 0:30");
}
@Test
public void testWeekendStart() {
    assertMinsBetween(30, "2013-01-05 23:30", "2013-01-07 0:30");
}
@Test
public void testTwoWeeks() {
    assertMinsBetween((int) TimeUnit.DAYS.toMinutes(10), "2013-01-08 23:30", "2013-01-22 23:30");
}
@Test
public void testTwoWeeksAndOneDay() {
    assertMinsBetween((int) TimeUnit.DAYS.toMinutes(11), "2013-01-08 23:30", "2013-01-23 23:30");
}
@Test
public void testOneWeekMinusOneDay() {
    assertMinsBetween((int) TimeUnit.DAYS.toMinutes(4), "2013-01-09 23:30", "2013-01-15 23:30");
}
private void assertMinsBetween(int expected, String start, String end) {
    try {
        assertEquals(expected, getMinsBetween(FORMAT.parse(start), FORMAT.parse(end), true));
    }
    catch (ParseException e) {
        throw new IllegalStateException(e);
    }
}
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