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I programmed some months ago some code with a lot of if statements. If region-active-p, if beginning-of-line, those kind of things.

Having learned about the cond lisp, I was wondering if I could improve my code a lot.

The problem is that this cond is only doing things when "true" as far as I see it, while I actually need the move back-to-indentation in between these checks.

In order to properly skip the last clause, I even have to set variable values.

(defun uncomment-mode-specific ()  
  "Uncomment region OR uncomment beginning of line comment OR uncomment end"
  (interactive)
  (let ((scvar 0) (scskipvar 0))
    (save-excursion
      (if (region-active-p)
         (progn (uncomment-region (region-beginning) (region-end))
         (setq scskipvar 1))
        (back-to-indentation))   ; this is that "else" part that doesn't fit in cond

      (while (string= (byte-to-string (following-char)) comment-start) 
       (delete-char 1) 
       (setq scskipvar 1))
      (indent-for-tab-command)

      (when (= scskipvar 0)
         (search-forward comment-start nil t)
         (backward-char 1)
         (kill-line))
    )))
)

So basically my question is, I would kind of like to have some consequences of not giving "true" to a clause, before the check of another clause. Is this possible? If not, what would be the best thing to do?

EDIT: Since we are using this as the example case for a solution, I wrote it down so it is easier to understand.

If region is active, remove comments from region. If not, move point to intendation.

For as long as the following character is a comment character, delete it. Afterwards, indent this line.

If it didn't do any of the above, search forward for a comment character, and kill that line.

share|improve this question
    
BTW uncomment-or-comment-region is already mode specific. (as is uncomment-region) –  Slomojo Jan 3 '13 at 9:20
    
I know, but these don't work yet when no region is selected. As you can see this combines when a region is selected, and when it is not. (oh and it is not "uncomment-or-comment" its more like "uncomment-region-or-something-else") –  PascalvKooten Jan 3 '13 at 9:23
2  
I'd like to add that you shouldn't think of cond as an 'inflexible switch', because each branch evaluates to a result. The idea is that you return something, rather than side-effecting. –  Chris Barrett Jan 3 '13 at 9:57
1  
If you're going to refactor this functional-style, I'd suggest breaking it up into simple predicate functions, then 'and/or' them up in the cond clauses. You'll be able to follow the control flow better. –  Chris Barrett Jan 3 '13 at 9:59
1  
@ChrisBarrett that's right, I'm probably pussy footing around the fact that switch sucks. –  Slomojo Jan 3 '13 at 10:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
(defun delete-on-this-line (regex)
  (replace-regexp regex "" nil (line-beginning-position) (line-end-position)))

(defun delete-leading-comment-chars ()
  (delete-on-this-line (eval `(rx bol (* space) (group (+ ,comment-start)))))) 

(defun delete-trailing-comment-chars ()
  (delete-on-this-line (eval `(rx (group (+ ,comment-end)) (* space) eol))))

(defun delete-trailing-comment ()
  (delete-on-this-line (eval `(rx (group (+ ,comment-start) (* anything) eol)))))

(defun uncomment-dwim ()
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (if (region-active-p) 
        (uncomment-region (region-beginning) (region-end))
      (or (delete-leading-comment-chars) 
          (delete-trailing-comment-chars)
          (delete-trailing-comment)))))

Edit: A little explanation: It's a lot easier to do regex replacements than manage loops to do deletion, so that gets rid of the state. And the steps are all mutually exclusive, so you can just use or for each option.

The rx macro is a little DSL that compiles down to valid regexes, and it's also amenable to lispy syntax transforms, so I can dynamically build a regex using the comment chars for the current mode.

share|improve this answer
    
This only misses the part for which, if all those cases don't hold, it searches for the first comment at the end of the line, and kills that line. –  PascalvKooten Jan 3 '13 at 10:31
    
Example: When the point is anywhere in the following string: "blabla ;;test" it should kill ";;test" –  PascalvKooten Jan 3 '13 at 10:31
    
See updated answer. –  Chris Barrett Jan 3 '13 at 10:43
1  
Reading up on rx makes this comprehensible and opens up a new world. –  PascalvKooten Jan 3 '13 at 11:18
1  
I'll hand you the +1 and answer nominations, for being devoted for this long to answering and a great result. –  PascalvKooten Jan 3 '13 at 11:19
(defmacro fcond (&rest body)
  (labels ((%substitute-last-or-fail 
            (new old seq)
            (loop for elt on seq
                  nconc
                  (if (eql (car elt) old)
                      (when (cdr elt)
                        (error "`%S' must be the last experssion in the clause" 
                               (car elt)))
                    (list new)
                    (list (car elt))))))
    (loop with matched = (gensym)
          with catcher = (gensym)
          for (head . rest) in body
          collect
          `(when (or ,head ,matched)
             (setq ,matched t)
             ,@(%substitute-last-or-fail `(throw ',catcher nil) 'return rest))
          into clauses
          finally
          (return `(let (,matched) (catch ',catcher ,@clauses))))))

(macroexpand '(fcond
               ((= 1 2) (message "1 = 2"))
               ((= 1 1) (message "1 = 1"))
               ((= 1 3) (message "1 = 3") return)
               ((= 1 4) (message "1 = 4"))))
(let (G36434)
  (catch (quote G36435)
    (when (or (= 1 2) G36434)
      (setq G36434 t)
      (message "1 = 2"))
    (when (or (= 1 1) G36434)
      (setq G36434 t)
      (message "1 = 1"))
    (when (or (= 1 3) G36434)
      (setq G36434 t)
      (message "1 = 3")
      (throw (quote G36435) nil))
    (when (or (= 1 4) G36434)
      (setq G36434 t)
      (message "1 = 4"))))

Here's something quick to do, what I think you may be after, i.e. something that would mimic the behaviour switch in C.

The idea is that all clauses are tested sequentially for equality, and if one matches, then all following clauses are executed, until the return keyword (it would be break in C, but Lisp uses return for the similar purpose in the loop, so I thought that return would be better). The code above thus will print:

1 = 1
1 = 3

Technically, this is not how switch works in C, but it will produce the same effect.

One thing I did here for simplicity, which you want to avoid / solve differently - the use of return keyword, you probably want to impose stricter rules on how it should be searched for.

share|improve this answer
1  
Heh, hardcore. +1up –  Chris Barrett Jan 3 '13 at 10:30
    
Great. That's why I love lisp... –  Diego Sevilla Jan 4 '13 at 10:20

cond

Cond evaluates a series of conditions in a list, each item in a list can be a condition, and then executable instructions.

The example in the Emacs Lisp manual is adequate to demonstrate how it works, I've annotated it here to help you understand how it works.

  (cond ((numberp x) x) ;; is x a number? return x
        ((stringp x) x) ;; is x a string? return x
        ((bufferp x) ;; is x a buffer? 
         (setq temporary-hack x) ;; set temporary-hack to buffer x
         (buffer-name x))        ;; return the buffer-name for buffer x
        ((symbolp x) (symbol-value x))) ;; is x a symbol? return the value of x

Each part of the condition can be evaluated any way you like, the fact x above is in each condition is coincidental.

For example:

 (cond ((eq 1 2) "Omg equality borked!") ;; Will never be true
       (t "default")) ;; always true

So comparisons with switch are a bit limited, it's essentially a list of if statements, that executes/returns the first true condition's body list.

Hopefully this helps you understand cond a bit better.

 (cond (condition body ... ) ;; execute body of 1st passing  
       (condition body ... ) ;; condition and return result  
       (condition body ... ) ;; of the final evaluation.
       ;; etc
 )  

OR

You can do things similar to switch with OR, depending on how you structure the code.

This isn't functional style, because it relies on side-effects to do what you want, then returns a boolean value for flow control, here's an example in pseudo lisp.

(or)

(or
     (lambda() (do something)
            (evaluate t or nil) ; nil to continue; t to quit.
     )
     (lambda() (do something)
            (evaluate t or nil) ; nil to continue; t to quit.
     )
     (lambda() (do something)
            (evaluate t or nil) ; nil to continue; t to quit.
     )
     (lambda() (do something)
            (evaluate t or nil) ; nil to continue; t to quit.
     )
)         

Here's working example of a switch like structure using or

(or
 (when (= 1 1) 
   (progn 
   (insert "hello\n")
           nil))
 (when (= 1 2)  ;; condition fails.
   (progn 
   (insert "hello\n")
           nil)) ;; returns false (nil)
 (when (= 1 1) 
   (progn 
   (insert "hello\n")
           t)) ;; returns true, so we bail.
 (when (= 1 1) 
   (progn 
   (insert "hello\n")
           nil))
)

Inserts :

hello
hello

(and)

The and operator (not just in Lisp) is also very useful, instead of evaluating everything until true, it evaluates conditions that are true, until a false is evaluated.

Both or & and can be used to build useful logic trees.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand cond now, but I was hoping there is a way to have else cases in between. At most I can take it that you show that what I hoped for is not possible within cond. Which leaves me with the following: what then? –  PascalvKooten Jan 3 '13 at 9:25
    
This is how cond works, there's nothing to stop you reorganising your logic tree to utilise it. But it's not an if / else. –  Slomojo Jan 3 '13 at 9:28
    
+1 for spending the time to teach me. It is really appreciated! –  PascalvKooten Jan 3 '13 at 10:56
    
@Dualinity no worries, it's good to know how to work with raw logic operators, to do fun stuff. –  Slomojo Jan 3 '13 at 11:13
    
added a macroless equivalent of @xvxvw's solution. –  Slomojo Jan 3 '13 at 11:17

This is how I did it now according to Chris' idea that breaking it down into seperate functions would make it easier.

EDIT: Now also applied the or knowledge gained in this thread gained from Slomojo (no more variables!)

(defun sc-uncomment ()
  (interactive)
  (or 
   (if (region-active-p) 
     (uncomment-region (region-beginning) (region-end))
    (back-to-indentation)
    nil)
   (if (string= (byte-to-string (following-char)) comment-start)
     (sc-check-start)
    (sc-end))))

(defun sc-check-start ()
  (interactive)
  (while (string= (byte-to-string (following-char)) comment-start) 
    (delete-char 1)) 
)

(defun sc-end ()
  (interactive)
  (search-forward comment-start nil t)
  (backward-char 1)
  (kill-line))
)
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