Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Normally i would populate a field using annotations when I knew the property name like so :

@Value("${myproperties.myValue}")
private String myString

However I now want to loop through all the properties in a file, when their names are unknown, and store both there value and name. What's the best way with spring and java ?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually if you need only to read properties from a file and not to use these properties in Spring's property placeholders, then the solution is simple

public class Test1 {
    @Autowired
    Properties props;

    public void printProps() {
        for(Entry<Object, Object> e : props.entrySet()) {
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }

...

<util:properties id="props" location="/spring.properties" />
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! seems so simple... –  NimChimpsky Jan 3 '13 at 11:18
add comment

Try this to get full list of keys and values from a file http://java2novice.com/java-collections-and-util/properties/all-keys/

share|improve this answer
    
that seems a bit long winded, is there a shorter, quicker springier way ? –  NimChimpsky Jan 3 '13 at 9:06
add comment

The @Value mechanism works through the PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer which is in turn a BeanFactoryPostProcessor. The properties used by it are not exposed at runtime. See this previous answer of mine for a possible solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I could not find a simpler solution than this

class PropertyPlaceholder extends PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer {
    Properties props;

    @Override
    protected Properties mergeProperties() throws IOException {
        props = super.mergeProperties();
        return props;
    }
}

public class Test1 {
    @Autowired
    PropertyPlaceholder pph;

    public void printProps() {
        for(Entry<Object, Object> e : pph.props.entrySet()) {
            System.out.println(e);
        }
    }

    ...

...

<bean class="test.PropertyPlaceholder">
    <property name="locations">
        <value>/app.properties</value>
    </property>
</bean>
share|improve this answer
    
thx, but how I would access the actual property values, and names ? –  NimChimpsky Jan 3 '13 at 10:09
    
added Test1.printProps as an example –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Jan 3 '13 at 10:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.