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Is it possible for me to find the children of a commit? All commands I've found, in either the man pages or suggestions from other people usually involve the branch name.

What I've effectively done is this: I have a commit tree:

A-B-C-D
      ^

My branch is pointing to D.

I've then rolled back to C, and committed E:

A-B-C-D
     \
      E
      ^

However in git rev-list, or in visual tools such as Sourcetree, it is, not surprisingly, displayed as

A-B-C-E
      ^

With no reference to D.

Obviously the commit D is stil in my repo, but without the commit ID, I'm having trouble locating it. Is there a command for displaying the children of a commit, regardless of what branch they're on, or if they're on a branch at all?

Edit

From the Nevik's answer below, --all doesn't seem to show the unreferenced commit. Taking this commit structure:

> git log --graph --oneline
* 0ff0f06 d
* ac06e14 c
* 3c45cce b
* b3aa730 a

And then rolling back to c:

> git reset --soft ac06
> git log --graph --oneline --all
* ac06e14 c
* 3c45cce b
* b3aa730 a

And then resetting back to d:

> git reset --soft 0ff0
> git log --graph --oneline --all
* 0ff0f06 d
* ac06e14 c
* 3c45cce b
* b3aa730 a

So the commit is definitely still in the repo.

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1  
Note that if a commit is not reachable from any branch or tag it will eventually be garbage collected, so commit D is not "obviously" still in the repo. –  johusman Jan 3 '13 at 9:25
    
Ah yes, but if a gc hasn't happened then commit is still there? I should still be able to reference the commit. If I knew its ID. –  Noel M Jan 3 '13 at 9:32
    
@NoelM: If gc didn't happen you can try to use reflog, either for a specific branch, or a reflog for HEAD. Note that reflog entries are kept only for limited time, by default 30 days for commits unreachable otherwise. –  Jakub Narębski Jan 3 '13 at 9:49
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try git reflog / git log -g (git log --walk-reflogs) or git reflog <branch>.


An example:

Let's start with the following situation

> git log --graph --oneline
* 84be53e d
* 8932c9a c
* 05cbe59 b
* 469baa5 a

"Remove" top commit. It is quite similar to doing git commit --amend to correct a top (latest) commit:

> git reset --soft HEAD~1

Note: this is equivalent to git reset --soft 8932c

As you wrote --all doesn't help in this situation, as 84be53e becomes unreachable.

> git log --graph --oneline --all
* 8932c9a c
* 05cbe59 b
* 469baa5 a

git reflog to the rescue... :-)

> git reflog
8932c9a HEAD@{0}: reset: moving to HEAD~1
84be53e HEAD@{1}: commit: d
8932c9a HEAD@{2}: commit: c
05cbe59 HEAD@{3}: commit: b
469baa5 HEAD@{4}: commit (initial): a

If you are switching between branches then the branch specific reflog might be better:

> git branch
* master
> git reflog master
8932c9a master@{0}: reset: moving to HEAD~1
84be53e master@{1}: commit: d
8932c9a master@{2}: commit: c
05cbe59 master@{3}: commit: b
469baa5 master@{4}: commit (initial): a

Note: if you were using git-aware shell prompt showing current branch then using git branch to check current branch would be not necessary.

Now you can use git reset --soft 84be5 or git reset --soft HEAD@{1} or git reset --soft master@{1} (or use shorter form for latest: git reset --soft @{1}).

> git reset --soft @{1}
> git log --graph --oneline --all
* 84be53e d
* 8932c9a c
* 05cbe59 b
* 469baa5 a

See also: reflog, your safety net on gitready (for example).

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Yep, reflog sorted it. Thanks! –  Noel M Jan 3 '13 at 10:35
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You can use the --all switch for git log and git rev-list to display commits from all branches (and even those which arent on branches).

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This doesn't do it. I've updated my question referencing --all –  Noel M Jan 3 '13 at 9:56
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