Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best way to specify a property name when using INotifyPropertyChanged?

Most examples hardcode the property name as an argument on the PropertyChanged Event. I was thinking about using MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod.Name.Substring(4) but am a little uneasy about the reflection overhead.

share|improve this question
6  
.NET 4.5 gives a good solution to this with the [CallerMemberName] attribute. See an example of its use in the MSDN documentation msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Kerry Jenkins Mar 6 '12 at 14:24

15 Answers 15

up vote 37 down vote accepted

Don't forget one thing : PropertyChanged event is mainly consumed by components that will use reflection to get the value of the named property.

The most obvious example is databinding.

When you fire PropertyChanged event, passing the name of the property as a parameter, you should know that the subscriber of this event is likely to use reflection by calling, for instance, GetProperty (at least the first time if it uses a cache of PropertyInfo), then GetValue. This last call is a dynamic invocation (MethodInfo.Invoke) of the property getter method, which costs more than the GetProperty which only queries meta data. (Note that data binding relies on the whole TypeDescriptor thing -- but the default implementation uses reflection.)

So, of course using hard code property names when firing PropertyChanged is more efficient than using reflection for dynamically getting the name of the property, but IMHO, it is important to balance your thoughts. In some cases, the performance overhead is not that critical, and you could benefit from some kind on strongly typed event firing mechanism.

Here is what I use sometimes in C# 3.0, when performances would not be a concern :

public class Person : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string name;

    public string Name
    {
        get { return this.name; }
        set 
        { 
            this.name = value;
            FirePropertyChanged(p => p.Name);
        }
    }

    private void FirePropertyChanged<TValue>(Expression<Func<Person, TValue>> propertySelector)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged == null)
            return;

        var memberExpression = propertySelector.Body as MemberExpression;
        if (memberExpression == null)
            return;

        PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(memberExpression.Member.Name));
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

Notice the use of the expression tree to get the name of the property, and the use of the lambda expression as an Expression :

FirePropertyChanged(p => p.Name);
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like overkill for a problem of property changing. While it maintains everything in refactorable code, you end up with a lot more code to maintain and that code is less readable than the original concept of OnPropertyChanged("Name") or a similar method. –  Orion Adrian Mar 19 '10 at 19:03
1  
Very cool. Is there any way to avoid using strings completely do you think? –  strongriley Apr 30 '12 at 18:35
1  
@strongriley: The solution presented here doesn't use any string. So I'm not sure I understand what you mean... –  Romain Verdier May 2 '12 at 9:45
1  
When you consume the event I mean. Instead of using INotifyPropertyChanged, is there an interface that could be created where the EventArgs didn't use a string literal in the 1st place? –  strongriley May 2 '12 at 11:48
2  
Notice that Microsoft never shows an example with the reflection solution. In .NET 4.5 we can now use the new [CallerMemberName] attribute msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  B413 Sep 27 '12 at 13:12

The reflection overhead here is pretty much overkill especially since INotifyPropertyChanged gets called a lot. It's best just to hard code the value if you can.

If you aren't concerned about performance then I'd look at the various approached mentioned below and pick that that requires the least amount of coding. If you could do something to completely removes the need for the explicit call then that would be best (e.g. AOP).

share|improve this answer

The performance hit involved in the use of expression trees is due to the repeated resolution of the expression tree.

The following code still uses expression trees and thus has the consequent advantages of being refactoring friendly and obfuscation friendly, but is actually approx 40% faster (very rough tests) than the usual technique - which consists of newing up a PropertyChangedEventArgs object for every change notification.

It's quicker and avoids the performance hit of the expression tree because we cache a static PropertyChangedEventArgs object for each property.

There's one thing which I'm not yet doing - I intend to add some code which checks for debug builds that the property name for the supplied PropertChangedEventArgs object matches the property within which it is being used - at the moment with this code it is still possible for the developer to supply the wrong object.

Check it out:

    public class Observable<T> : INotifyPropertyChanged
    where T : Observable<T>
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected static PropertyChangedEventArgs CreateArgs(
        Expression<Func<T, object>> propertyExpression)
    {
        var lambda = propertyExpression as LambdaExpression;
        MemberExpression memberExpression;
        if (lambda.Body is UnaryExpression)
        {
            var unaryExpression = lambda.Body as UnaryExpression;
            memberExpression = unaryExpression.Operand as MemberExpression;
        }
        else
        {
            memberExpression = lambda.Body as MemberExpression;
        }

        var propertyInfo = memberExpression.Member as PropertyInfo;

        return new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyInfo.Name);
    }

    protected void NotifyChange(PropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, args);
        }
    }
}

public class Person : Observable<Person>
{
    // property change event arg objects
    static PropertyChangedEventArgs _firstNameChangeArgs = CreateArgs(x => x.FirstName);
    static PropertyChangedEventArgs _lastNameChangeArgs = CreateArgs(x => x.LastName);

    string _firstName;
    string _lastName;

    public string FirstName
    {
        get { return _firstName; }
        set
        {
            _firstName = value;
            NotifyChange(_firstNameChangeArgs);
        }
    }

    public string LastName
    {
        get { return _lastName; }
        set
        {
            _lastName = value;
            NotifyChange(_lastNameChangeArgs);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note, there's actually a problem with the above code - it constrains T to the immediate subtype (since the immediate subtype specified T as itself). This means you couldn't use CreateArgs when dealing with properties in a class that is further down the hierarchy from Person. A simple fix to this is to make the CreateArgs method generic, i.e. CreateArgs<T> instead of having the Observable class generic. It is a bit more of a pain to use since you have to explicitly specify the type e.g.: static PropertyChangedEventArgs _firstNameChangeArgs = CreateArgs<Person>(x => x.FirstName); –  Phil Aug 25 '09 at 16:32
    
Anything to forces me to change my base class is a big no-no. I don't exactly have the option to change the base class for something that already has to have a different base class or has a auto-generated base-class. –  Orion Adrian Mar 19 '10 at 19:02
1  
Orion... if that's the case, it should be easy enough to convert the above from a base class Observable to a helper class (e.g. 'ObservableHelper') that you can call explicitly. If you're interested, I could probably post an update which would cover the use case where you can't control which base class is used or don't want to introduce one. Though, where you do control the base class I do think there are advantages in using a base class; simplicity of usage being the main one. –  Phil Mar 21 '10 at 4:18

Roman:

I'd say you wouldn't even need the "Person" parameter - accordingly, a completely generic snippet like the one below should do:

private int age;
public int Age
{
  get { return age; }
  set
  {
    age = value;
    OnPropertyChanged(() => Age);
  }
}


private void OnPropertyChanged<T>(Expression<Func<T>> exp)
{
  //the cast will always succeed
  MemberExpression memberExpression = (MemberExpression) exp.Body;
  string propertyName = memberExpression.Member.Name;

  if (PropertyChanged != null)
  {
    PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
  }
}

...however, I prefer sticking to string parameters with conditional validation in Debug builds. Josh Smith posted a nice sample on this:

A base class which implements INotifyPropertyChanged

Cheers :) Philipp

share|improve this answer
    
I'm upvoting for the strings with conditional validation. It's simple and it works. At the end of the day, none of these reflection solutions solve the problem that I'd want solved - compile time checking of property change notifications. –  17 of 26 Apr 24 '10 at 14:41

Yeah I see the use and simplicity of the function you are suggesting, but when considering the running cost due to reflection, yeah that is a bad idea, What I use for this scenario is having a Code snippet added properly to take advantage of the time and error in writing a property with all the Notifyproperty event firing.

share|improve this answer

In .NET 4.5 (C# 5.0) there is a new attribute called - CallerMemberName it helps avoid hardcoded property names preventing the onset of bugs if developers decide to change a property name, here's an example:

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged = delegate { };

public void OnPropertyChanged([CallerMemberName]string propertyName="")
{
    PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
}

private string name;
public string Name
{
    get { return name; }
    set 
    { 
        name = value;
        OnPropertyChanged();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Another VERY NICE method I can think of is

Auto-implement INotifyPropertyChanged with Aspects
AOP: Aspect oriented programming

Nice article on codeproject: AOP Implementation of INotifyPropertyChanged

share|improve this answer
1  
I also think that AOP is the best solution for that kind of problems. But you know most C# developers don't really knows what AOP is. –  B413 Sep 27 '12 at 13:15

You might be interessted in this discussion about

"Best Practices: How to implement INotifyPropertyChanged right?"

too.

share|improve this answer

Without be irrevelant, between Hardcode and reflection, my choice is : notifypropertyweaver.

This Visual Studio package allow you to have the benefits of reflection (maintainability, readability,..) without have to lose perfs.

Actually, you just have to implement the INotifyPropertyChanged and it add all the "notification stuff" at the compilation.

This is also fully parametrable if you want to fully optimize your code.

For example, with notifypropertyweaver, you will have this code in you editor :

public class Person : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public string GivenNames { get; set; }
    public string FamilyName { get; set; }

    public string FullName
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Format("{0} {1}", GivenNames, FamilyName);
        }
    }
}

Instead of :

public class Person : INotifyPropertyChanged
{

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private string givenNames;
    public string GivenNames
    {
        get { return givenNames; }
        set
        {
            if (value != givenNames)
            {
                givenNames = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("GivenNames");
                OnPropertyChanged("FullName");
            }
        }
    }

    private string familyName;
    public string FamilyName
    {
        get { return familyName; }
        set
        {
            if (value != familyName)
            {
                familyName = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("FamilyName");
                OnPropertyChanged("FullName");
            }
        }
    }

    public string FullName
    {
        get
        {
            return string.Format("{0} {1}", GivenNames, FamilyName);
        }
    }

    public virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var propertyChanged = PropertyChanged;
        if (propertyChanged != null)
        {
            propertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

For french speakers : Améliorez la lisibilité de votre code et simplifiez vous la vie avec notifypropertyweaver

share|improve this answer

Additionally, we found an issue where getting a method name worked differently in Debug vs. Release builds:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wpf/thread/244d3f24-4cc4-4925-aebe-85f55b39ec92

(The code we were using wasn't exactly reflection in the way you suggested, but it convinced us that hardcoding the property name was the fastest and most reliable solution.)

share|improve this answer

The problem with the reflection based method is that it's rather expensive, and isn't terribly quick. Sure, it is much more flexible, and less brittle towards refactoring.

However, it really can hurt performance, especially when things are called frequently. The stackframe method, also (I believe) has issues in CAS (e.g. restricted trust levels, such as XBAP). It's best to hard code it.

If your looking for fast, flexible property notification in WPF there is a solution -- use DependencyObject :) Thats what it was designed for. If you don't want to take the dependency, or worry about the thread affinity issues, move the property name into a constant, and boom! your good.

share|improve this answer

I did something like this once as an experiment, from memory it worked OK, and removed the need to hardcode all the property names in strings. Performance could be in issue if your building a high volume server application, on the desktop you'll probably never notice the difference.

protected void OnPropertyChanged()
{
    OnPropertyChanged(PropertyName);
}

protected string PropertyName
{
    get
    {
        MethodBase mb = new StackFrame(1).GetMethod();
        string name = mb.Name;
        if(mb.Name.IndexOf("get_") > -1)
	        name = mb.Name.Replace("get_", "");

        if(mb.Name.IndexOf("set_") > -1)
	        name = mb.Name.Replace("set_", "");

        return name;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like the creative way of doing this. It probably shouldn't be used in practice. But the concept is interesting. –  TamusJRoyce Mar 12 '12 at 15:38

You might want to avoid INotifyPropertyChanged altogether. It adds unnecessary bookkeeping code to your project. Consider using Update Controls .NET instead.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.