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I want to use "member" function like "eq", "null" etc. However, I do not know how can I fix it?

(define (member atm lst)
    (cond
        ((null? lst) #F)
        ((eq? atm (car lst)) #T)
        (else (member atm (cdr lst)))
    )
)

and where I used;

(define (duplicate-entries lst)
    (cond
        ((null? lst) #F)
        ((member? (car lst) (cdr lst))) #T)
        (else duplicate-entries (cdr lst))
    )
)

member? does not work, how can i fix it?

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1  
Well, it is just because member? ist an unbound variable, you did not define it! You defined member. By the way, you are essentially talking about the memq-function wich is part of any R5RS compliant implementation. Besides, there are some other flaws: duplicate-entries misses a bracket and its intention is not quite clear. –  user1710139 Jan 3 '13 at 11:33
    
Why not use memq ? –  leppie Jan 3 '13 at 11:47
1  
Please indent the code according to the Scheme convention - notice that closing parenthesis should be left in the same line, not in a different line like one does with braces in other languages. And the boolean values are written in lowercase: #t, #f –  Óscar López Jan 3 '13 at 13:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have defined member function whereas you are using member?. Define member as member? i.e (define (member? atm lst) ... )

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This is right, but according to the semantics of scheme the question-mark is wrong, because the OP’s function does not necessarily return a boolean (see also my comment above and R5RS). –  user1710139 Jan 3 '13 at 11:36
    
@LudwigMeier: I think the OP implementation of member has only boolean return value.. isn't it? –  Ankur Jan 3 '13 at 11:40
    
I am sorry, you are right of course. While testing, I must have messed it up with the buildt-in member-function, which indeed returns no boolean. So my first comment was nonsense. –  user1710139 Jan 3 '13 at 11:52

Let's take a look at each procedure in turn, first member. Be aware that there's already a standard member function in Scheme, so it's a bad idea to define a new procedure with the same name. Here's what the existing member procedure does:

member locates the first element of lst that is equal? to v. If such an element exists, the tail of lst starting with that element is returned. Otherwise, the result is #f.

The above procedure uses equal? for testing and returns a value different to what you expect. Somewhat closer to the intended procedure, we have the standard memq function:

memq like member, but finds an element using eq?.

But again, the returned value is not what you expect. I suggest you define your procedure like this, noticing that we're using memq, and according to the convention, the name ends with a ? to indicate that this is a boolean procedure:

(define (member? atm lst)
  (if (memq atm lst) #t #f))

Now let's look at duplicate-entries. There are a couple of parenthesis problems (correctly indenting the code would have shown this), and there's a problem with the name of the membership procedure (your procedure is called member but you're invoking it as member?). You either use the member? we just defined above, or use memq, both approaches will work fine in this case, because memq will return a non-false value if the element was found, and that will make the condition true:

(define (duplicate-entries lst)
  (cond ((null? lst) #f)
        ((member? (car lst) (cdr lst)) #t)
        (else (duplicate-entries (cdr lst)))))

Or this, which is the recommended way - there's no need to reinvent the wheel if an existing procedure does what you need:

(define (duplicate-entries lst)
  (cond ((null? lst) #f)
        ((memq (car lst) (cdr lst)) #t)
        (else (duplicate-entries (cdr lst)))))
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