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Depending on user preferences I want to compare object values of an array list and get the max values. My first approach was to define a function for object property and iterate through the array list.

    private MyModel getMaxValueA(ArrayList<MyModel> myModelList) {
    MyModel res = null;
    for (MyModel myModel : myModelList) {
        if (myModel != null) {
            if (myModel.valueA() > res.valueA()) {
                res = myModel;
            }
        } else {
            res = myModel;
        }
    }
    return res;
}

The problem is, i have 4 different values i want to compare, and to define 4 similar funktion does not seem to be the right was, so i tried it to combine all functions and added a switch/case

    private MyModel getMaxValueA(ArrayList<MyModel> myModelList, Setting mySetting) {
    MyModel res = null;
    for (MyModel myModel : myModelList) {
        if (myModel != null) {
            switch (mySetting) {
            case settingA:
                if (myModel.valueA() > res.valueA()) {
                     res = myModel;
                    }
                break;
            case settingB:
                if (myModel.valueB() > res.valueB()) {
                     res = myModel;
                    }

                break;
            ........
        } else {
            res = myModel;
        }
    }
    return res;
}

This is a bit shorter and only 1 instead of 4 functions, but it doesnt make me happy, too. Do you have any ideas to improve it?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

Implement all your different needs like this:

class SettingsAComparator extends Comparator<MyModel> {
    @Override
    public int compare(MyModel m1, MyModel m2) {
         return m1.valueA() - m2.valueA();
    }
}

class SettingsBComparator extends Comparator<MyModel> {
    // Please use better names.
    // you can implement as many Comparators as necessary.
}

and change your method to

private MyModel getMaxValue(ArrayList<MyModel> myModelList, Comparator<MyModel> comparator) {
    return Collections.max(myModelList, comparator);
}

This way, you can always add different comparators, if your class gets a new attribute, but you'll never have to worry about changing getMaxValue() again. Also you can implement complex comparators, that take more than one attribute value into account.

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Implement a Comparator

 class MyComparator extends Comparator<MyModel> {
     Setting s;
     MyComparator(Setting s ){
        this.setting=s;
     } 
     public int compare(MyModel model, MyModel model2) {
        //do the comparison utilizing setting

     }

Edited looking at another answer: Then use Collections.max(listToBeSorted, new MyComparator(setting)) to get max value

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now you bring all the ugly code into compare() because the setting has to be taken into account. It's much easier to write, maintain and debug to have different Comparator classes for different needs instead of packing all the logic into one. –  jlordo Jan 3 '13 at 11:25
    
IMHO it depends on whether he already have a Setting object. If that Setting object is created just for this purpose, what you mentioned of having multiple comparators is better. –  Subin Jan 3 '13 at 11:28
    
Even if he already has a Settings object my way is nicer, because it generates short maintainable methods. He can choose the comparator based on the Setting, instead of having one giant comparator that contains code like (pseudocode) if (Setting == Option1)... else if (Setting == Option2)... –  jlordo Jan 3 '13 at 11:30
    
Agreed that my way generates a bigger and complicated compare() method. On other hand in your method we have to write lot of classes each with smaller methods. Well I am not that experienced to comprehend which is better. –  Subin Jan 3 '13 at 11:33
    
better is always subjective. But if I am looking for an error while debugging, I rather read 10 methods, with 30 lines each (preferrably easy to read), instead of one with 300 (that is most likely pretty complex, or it wouldn't be that long). Also, if you want to add some logic in the future, you can just add a new comparator, instead of finding the right spot to add the code in the huge one. –  jlordo Jan 3 '13 at 11:36
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