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I have a problem statement which is working but still i would like to know more efficient, faster and more importantly correctly designed to handle the below mentioned scenario.

I have a POJO class

class A {
  String s;
  Double d;
}

I am trying to populate a List, basically a List of Object A into the list. Now the implementation in question. While adding the Object A into the list i need to check if an Object with String s already exists. If yes i want to update the older Object with old d1 + new d1 and do not add the new Object to the list, If no add the new Object to the list. My present implementation is something like below.

double dd = 0.0;
    List<A> aList = new List<A>();
    List<A> aListToRemove = new List<A>();
    A newA = null;
    for(int i=0;i<=100;i++ ){
        newA = method call which returns newA;
        for(A oldA: aList ){
            if(oldA.getS().equals(newA.getS())){
                dd = oldA.getD() + newA.getD();
                newA.setD(dd);
                aListToRemove.add(oldA);
            }
            aList.add(newA);
            aList.removeAll(aListToRemove);
        }
    }

//at the end, i would like to see aList with no duplicates, but with updated d value.

Is there a more efficient way to do the processing within the second for loop?

share|improve this question
    
Can i implement a comparator and somehow update the list when i call the List.add() method. This way the update and adding to the list and removing the older element will happen just on the call of add or compare method. Please educate me. –  sandy Jan 3 '13 at 11:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems you could use a map for your use case:

Map<String, A> map = new HashMap<> ();

and put items in the map like this:

map.put(someA.s, someA);

That should turn your O(n^2) algoritm into an O(n) algorithm.

When you receive a newA, you can use the following:

A a = map.get(newA.getS());
if (a == null) {
    map.put(newA.getS(), newA); //new string => new item in the map
} else {
    a.setD(a.getD() + newA.getD()); //found string => updating the existing item
}
share|improve this answer
    
In this approach will the value for d get updated. That should be an additional step before i put into the Map right. I had mentioned i need value of d to be added. –  sandy Jan 3 '13 at 13:30
    
@sandy I have updated my answer with an example. –  assylias Jan 3 '13 at 14:19
    
Thanks, but i have a question. This implementation removes out additional Collection elements, but is it efficient enough in terms of performance, memory management etc.. –  sandy Jan 3 '13 at 14:26
    
@sandy it will certainly perform better than your example with 2 nested loops. Memory wise it will take a bit more space, but unless you work in a memory-constrained environment it should not be an issue (probably a few bytes per object, which unless you have billions of them should be ok). –  assylias Jan 3 '13 at 14:30

You should really consider using a Map.

share|improve this answer

Does it have to be a List? It sounds like a Map could do the job for you. Specifically, the put() operation adds or replaces a key-value pair, which fits your semantics perfectly.

Cheers,

share|improve this answer

Consider using a Map. You can check if an item is in the map with the get method (it seems s would be the key):

A a = myMap.get(newA.getS());
if (a != null){
 a.setD(a.getD() + newA.getD());
} else {
 myMap.put(newA);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Let me implement and update. –  sandy Jan 3 '13 at 13:29

If you want efficiency, I would use a MultiMap or Map<String, List<String>> This will mroe more efficient to not only perform the lookup but the accumulation of data. If you need to append the String together, the best option could be to use a Map<String, double[]>

class A {
  String s;
  double d; // don't use Double unless you need null values.
}

Map<String, double[]> map = new LinkedHashMap<>();

for(A newA: getAs()) {
    double[] total = map.get(newA.getS());
    if (total== null)
        map.put(newA.getS(), total = new double[0]);
    total[0] += newA.getD();
}

This will give you O(1) lookup and accumulate the values with a minimum of object creation.

share|improve this answer

You should use a java.util.Set for your operations.

You can check the existence of your object in O(1) time and perform your operation accordingly.

It will also take care of removing the duplicates.

   double dd = 0.0;
    Set<A> aList = new HashSet<A>();
    A newA = null;
    for(int i=0;i<=100;i++ ){
        newA = //method call which returns newA;
        A oldA = aList.get(newA);
        if(oldA != null){
           aList.remove(oldA);
        }
        dd = oldA.getD() + newA.getD();
        newA.setD(dd);
        aList.add(newA);
    }

Please make sure you override your equals and hashcode() methods in class A which will be used by Set else the default implementation will be used

share|improve this answer
    
But it will not overwrite existing older entries with newer values... –  Anders R. Bystrup Jan 3 '13 at 11:21
    
you can always remove the old entry and insert a new entry in the set. it is also an O(1) operation –  rahulroc Jan 3 '13 at 11:24
    
True, but it adds complexity and a Map is really a better choice. –  Anders R. Bystrup Jan 3 '13 at 11:38
    
Yep, one extra removal operation is required in case of Set. but if you add more fields in this object and the equality of the object depends on more fields than just S in current case, then Set will not require any changes in implementation whereas the Map implementation needs to change completely –  rahulroc Jan 3 '13 at 11:45
    
You would need to change both equals() and hashcode()... –  Anders R. Bystrup Jan 3 '13 at 11:48

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