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I want to initialize a member (of reference type) in one object to point to a private member of another object (of a different type). I use friend to provide access to the private member. (Please bear with me for a bit, I explain further down why I need to do this.)

Below is a bare minimum version of the code I tried to get started with, and it obviously does not work. Now clearly, I am only trying to initialize the reference with this code Aries a(t.Leo);, but because this is done inside main(), it does not compile.

I went through a number of posts here and on the internet (on the topics of friend and reference), but could not figure out a way to solve it. How could I make this work, or what other approach could I try to bind the reference correctly?

class Aries;

class Taurus {
friend class Aries;
public:
  void setLeo(int inLeo) {
    Leo = inLeo;
  }

private:
  int Leo;
};

class Aries {
public:
  Aries(const int& inCancer) : Cancer(inCancer) {}

private:
  const int& Cancer;
};

int main() {
  Taurus t;
  Aries a(t.Leo);  // Intention: initialize (bind) the Cancer member with t's Leo.
}

Note I know enough C++ to understand why the above practice is considered questionable or bad.

I am working on a research project in a hardware simulation environment, where the testbench is written in C++. The aim of the project is to display the class (private) members as a waveform. The only reliable way of doing this is to make the "waveform maker" class as a friend of the testbench objects, and then have it "stalk" the private members (by creating a reference as above). The other alternative of providing getter methods in the testbench is impractical, since this project would be used with 20 years worth of legacy code.

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Intriguing name obfuscation... –  Chowlett Jan 3 '13 at 11:58
    
@Chowlett ha ha, foo bar baz is not enough sometimes. –  Happy Jan 3 '13 at 12:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I know you know that friend is questionable but sometimes necessary, but in this case, these classes don't have to be friends.

struct AriesBinder {
  AriesBinder(const int& c) : Cancer(c) {}
  const int& Cancer;
};

class Taurus {
public:
  void setLeo(int inLeo) {
    Leo = inLeo;
  }

  AriesBinder bind() const { return AriesBinder(Leo); }

private:
  int Leo;
};

class Aries {
public:
  Aries(const int& inCancer) : Cancer(inCancer) {}
  Aries(AriesBinder b) : Cancer(b.Cancer) {}

private:
  const int& Cancer;
};

int main() {
  Taurus t;
  Aries b(t.bind());  // Intention was made clear
}

This is especially useful if many objects like Taurus can be bound to Aries. Also, it decouples the both classes since now the don't have to know each other so you may change the internal representation of Taurus.

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Your reasoning is valid and useful. The problem I have though is I have to make minimal changes to the Taurus class (which is the customer's code). I originally tried hard to figure out if this could be done without any code change at all, but since there is no standard-compliant way to access private members (and it is a scam, even if it is possible through some hacks), I settled for making just one change (adding a friend declaration). I personally prefer the non-friend version (like your code), but business considerations override the technical ones at work. :S –  Happy Jan 3 '13 at 12:29

Just change the Aries constructor to take a Taurus reference, instead of the private int directly. Like so:

class Aries;

class Taurus {
friend class Aries;
public:
  void setLeo(int inLeo) {
    leo = inLeo;
  }

private:
  int leo;
};

class Aries {
public:
  Aries(const Taurus& inTau) : Cancer(inTau.leo) {}

private:
  const int& Cancer;
};

int main() {
  Taurus t;
  Aries a(t);
}
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The purpose of friendship is to allow access to certain classes that are tightly coupled with yours, often class factories (which assign the members as they construct the class) or some special implementation class.

Therefore in your case, if Aries is a friend of Taurus, you would expect there to be a strong coupling between the two.

Your code doesn't work because you are accessing Taurus.Leo from main, not from Aries.

The purpose of the friendship is particularly to NOT have to create a public "getter" for these variables. That is because these variables are "internal detail" that you do not want the public at large to access, not even to read.

So whilst I'd expect most of the answers above to be possible solutions and will compile and work, you have to understand the concept of friendship and design for your particular case to see if it is an appropriate use.

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While I am not a C++ expert, I know it well enough, and agree with all you have said. The problem though is that I did not design the rest of the simulation environment. The original architecture was designed over 20 years ago. If this project had been considered at that time, they would have probably designed it such that friendship could be avoided, but now I am essentially tasked with "patching" a new feature over 20 years of legacy code. As you can imagine, it would be ugly, but I am trying to make it as less ugly as possible. –  Happy Jan 3 '13 at 12:35

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