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Consider the following Javascript code:

var a = [];

var f = function() {

    for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        a.push(function(){alert(i)});
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
        a[j]();
    }
};

The alerts print out '3' all three times. I want a different behaviour - in each iteration of the loop generate a function that prints the current value of i. I.e. 3 functions that print different indices.

Any ideas?

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marked as duplicate by minitech Jun 4 at 3:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Just to add this is because of Javascript has no concept of block scope only function scope, this thrown me too... mattfreeman.co.uk/2010/03/closures-scope-in-javascript-vs-c –  user53791 May 21 '10 at 8:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Create an anonymous function which accepts i as a parameter and returns that certain function:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    a.push((function(i) {
        return function() {
            alert(i);
        }
    })(i));
}

for (var j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
    a[j]();
}

Or do something similar: create an anonymous function which accepts i as a parameter to add the function to the array:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    (function(i) {
        a.push(function() {
            alert(i);
        });
    })(i);
}

for (var j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
    a[j]();
}
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1  
Not that its required, but I think it looks cleaner, and describes your intentions better to wrap your "immediately executed" functions in () -> (function(i){ ... })(i); –  gnarf Sep 12 '09 at 1:18
    
@gnarf, I was debating that myself. I guess it does make the intent clearer. I'll edit that in. –  strager Sep 12 '09 at 1:20
    
this seems to side-step the original problem by offering an alternative solution which is not susceptible to the same underlying flaws... What you're doing here is pushing values onto an array. The original poster is pushing functions, which, we presume, are to be executed at some later time... –  Funka Sep 12 '09 at 1:35
    
sorry, i commented too quickly. You are correct. Please also see my answer for a comparable solution to the same problem. –  Funka Sep 12 '09 at 1:37
1  
@funka - You still push functions: Creating the (function(i){ scopes the variable i to stay whatever it is was the function is called. With })(i); you then immediately call that new function with i as a parameter, which returns a function... effectively storing [function(){alert(0);},function(){alert(1);},function(){alert(2);}] in a –  gnarf Sep 12 '09 at 1:38

Just another approach, using currying:

var a = [];
var f = function() {
    for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        a.push((function(a){alert(a);}).curry(i));
    }
    for (var j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
        a[j]();
    }
};

// curry implementation
Function.prototype.curry = function() {
  var fn = this, args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
  return function() {
    return fn.apply(this, args.concat(
      Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments)));
  };
};

Check the above snippet running here.

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1  
Nice use of curry - although now I'm hungry.... –  gnarf Sep 12 '09 at 1:59
    
Wow. That's awesome. +1. –  strager Sep 12 '09 at 2:15
var iterate = (function () {
    var i, j = [];
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i += 1) {
        j.push(i);
        alert(j[j.length - 1]);
    }
}());

You don't need closure to merely output a value. Your code should, however, be contained in a function for object-oriented containment. Functions don't have to be called to be executed.

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"Functions don't have to be called to be executed." What? That statement isn't very clear, and as it is it sounds wrong. Clarify, please? –  strager Sep 12 '09 at 1:13
    
In order to execute a function one of three things must happen. 1) The function must be called by name by something else that is executing. 2) The function can be inserted into a method, at which case the function can be anonymous and still be executed. I strongly object to using functions without giving them a name. 3) Functions can execute entirely on their own as they are interpreted if they are terminated with a parenthesis after their closing bracket, such as }(). That is called immediate evocation. –  austin cheney Sep 12 '09 at 1:24
    
I disagree. A function is a value type, just like 42 or 'hello world', in Javascript. Whether or not it is assigned to a variable or used directly means nothing special. For an example of this behaviour, run: (function(i) { var func = arguments.callee; if(!i) return; console.log('x'); window.setTimeout(function() { func(i - 1); }, 1000); })(4); –  strager Sep 12 '09 at 1:31
2  
@austin: I couldn't disagree more with the statement "I strongly object to using functions without giving them a name" - anonymous functions are one of the most useful tools in the javascript ninja's repertoire. –  gnarf Sep 12 '09 at 1:42
    
There are benefits to always naming your functions. 1) An anonymous function does the exact same thing as a function of immediate invocation except that can be used in few places. 2)A named function makes the writing of documentation significantly easier and more details. 3) Named functions provide a know place for unit testing where that some location is not uniquely know when using anonymous functions. As a result there are significant benefits to always naming functions and no benefits from not naming functions. –  austin cheney Sep 12 '09 at 3:10

You can put the body of your loop in an anonymous function:

var a = [];

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) (function(i) {
    a.push(function() { alert(i); });
})(i)

for(var j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
    a[j]();
}

By creating that function and passing the loop's value of "i" as the argument, we are creating a new "i" variable inside the body of the loop that essentially hides the outer "i". The closure you push onto the array now sees the new variable, the value of which is set when the outer function function is called in the first loop. This might be clearer if we use a different name when we create the new variable... This does the same thing:

var a = [];

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) (function(iNew) {
    a.push(function() { alert(iNew); });
})(i)

for(var j = 0; j < 3; j++) {
    a[j]();
}

The value of "iNew" is assigned 0, then 1, then 2 because the function is called immediately by the loop.

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function(i){alert(i)

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2  
More than likely, i will be undefined. –  strager Sep 12 '09 at 1:10
    
+1 for terseness. This will work if a.push(function(i){alert(i)}); is used instead of a.push(function(){alert(i)}); –  T. Markle Jan 18 at 15:13

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