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Specifying a cast operator that returns a vector results in error C2664.

void foo(const std::vector<std::wstring>& s)
{
}

class Wrapper
{
public:
    Wrapper(const std::vector<std::wstring>& s) : m_s(s)
    {
    }
    operator std::vector<std::wstring>() const
    {
        return m_s;
    }
private:
    const std::vector<std::wstring> m_s;
};

Wrapper wrapper(std::vector<std::wstring>());
foo(wrapper);
foo(static_cast<std::vector<std::wstring>>(wrapper));

I get:

error C2664: '`anonymous-namespace'::foo' : cannot convert parameter 1 from '`anonymous-namespace'::Wrapper (__cdecl *)(std::vector<_Ty> (__cdecl *)(void))' to 'const std::vector<_Ty> &'
with
[
  _Ty=std::wstring
]
Reason: cannot convert from 'overloaded-function' to 'const std::vector<_Ty>'
with
[
  _Ty=std::wstring
]
No constructor could take the source type, or constructor overload resolution was ambiguous

The same code with a wstring does work:

void foo(const std::wstring& s)
{
}

class Wrapper
{
public:
    Wrapper(const std::wstring& s) : m_s(s)
    {
    }
    operator std::wstring() const
    {
        return m_s;
    }
private:
    const std::wstring m_s;
};

Wrapper wrapper(std::wstring(L"test"));
foo(wrapper);

Is this a bug in the Visual Studio compiler or are containers something special here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Most Vexing Parse - wrapper is declared as a function not an object.

Specifically, it's a function that returns Wrapper, and takes a pointer to a function that returns std::vector<std::wstring> and takes no parameters.

The constructor parameter L"test" avoids this in your code with wstring, because it can't be part of a function declaration, and so the declaration is an object definition. In this particular case, the simplest fix to your code is probably to pass 0 as a constructor parameter to the vector instead of no args.

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1  
I'd say a simpler (C++11) version would be to use the new initialization syntax: Wrapper wrapper{std::vector<std::wstring>()}; –  Agentlien Jan 3 '13 at 13:22
    
@Agentlien: agreed. I wonder whether in C++11 mode there would be some value to a compiler warning for using parentheses in an initialization. Optional of course, since you wouldn't want to have to change all such initializations in existing code, but it would break the habit that leads to this error. –  Steve Jessop Jan 3 '13 at 13:25
    
@Agentlien: true, but the question is tagged as "vs2010", which to the best of my knowledge (I might be wrong though) does not support uniform initialization –  Andy Prowl Jan 3 '13 at 13:28
    
Steve Jessop: I think it'd be best to at least get such a recommendation when compilation fails due to Most Vexing Parse. @AndyProwl A valid point, I already forgot that it wasn't in VS2010. –  Agentlien Jan 3 '13 at 13:33
1  
You can simply use double parentheses: Wrapper wrapper((std::vector<std::wstring>())); –  ltjax Jan 3 '13 at 13:40

Just change the line:

Wrapper wrapper(std::vector<std::wstring>());

into:

std::vector<std::wstring> v;
Wrapper wrapper(v);

Your original declaration of wrapper is parsed as the declaration of a function which returns an object of type Wrapper and accepts in input a function which returns an std::vector<std::wstring> and takes no argument.

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