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What is the easiest way to get the maximum value in a TList<Integer>?

function GetMaximum(AList: TList<Integer>): Integer;
begin
  Assert(AList.Count > 0);
  Result := ?;
end;

I read that C# has a AList.Max, is there something like that in Delphi?

share|improve this question
    
The .NET way: stackoverflow.com/questions/5295112/… –  Jens Mühlenhoff Jan 3 '13 at 13:26
    
Of course, .net has lovely extension methods to do this sort of thing....... –  David Heffernan Jan 3 '13 at 15:57
3  
The Spring Framework for Delphi defines IEnumerable<T> interface which provides LINQ-like enumerable extension methods. Recommended! –  Erwin Jan 3 '13 at 16:28
1  
@Marjan Venema: In Generics.Collections the class TEnumerable<T> is defined. On the other hand in the Spring Framework for Delphi the collections are interface based. In unit Spring.Collections.Lists a class TList<T> is defined which provides the extension methods, and ultimately implements IEnumerable(T). You can call List.Max, but also List.Reversed for example. See also Demo.Spring.Enumerators project. –  Erwin Jan 3 '13 at 21:37
1  
@Marjan Venema: Also Nick Hodges has written nice series of articles on Dependency Injection with Delphi Spring Framework. You also have Lazy initialization and Nullable Types. Like I said: recommended! –  Erwin Jan 3 '13 at 21:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Here's a fun example with a MaxValue implementation on a generic container:

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.Generics.Defaults, System.Generics.Collections;

type
  TMyList<T> = class(TList<T>)
  public
    function MaxValue: T;
  end;

{ TMyList<T> }

function TMyList<T>.MaxValue: T;
var
  i: Integer;
  Comparer: IComparer<T>;
begin
  if Count=0 then
    raise Exception.Create('Cannot call TMyList<T>.MaxValue on an empty list');
  Comparer := TComparer<T>.Default;
  Result := Self[0];
  for i := 1 to Count-1 do
    if Comparer.Compare(Self[i], Result)>0 then
      Result := Self[i];
end;

var
  IntList: TMyList<Integer>;
  DoubleList: TMyList<Double>;
  StringList: TMyList<string>;

begin
  IntList := TMyList<Integer>.Create;
  IntList.AddRange([10, 5, 12, -49]);
  Writeln(IntList.MaxValue);

  DoubleList := TMyList<Double>.Create;
  DoubleList.AddRange([10.0, 5.0, 12.0, -49.0]);
  Writeln(DoubleList.MaxValue);

  StringList := TMyList<string>.Create;
  StringList.AddRange(['David Heffernan', 'Uwe Raabe', 'Warren P', 'Jens Mühlenhoff']);
  Writeln(StringList.MaxValue);

  Readln;
end.

Because we cannot come up with a generic equivalent to low(Integer) I raise an exception when the method is called on an empty list.

The output is:

12
 1.20000000000000E+0001
Warren P
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the nice hat. –  Warren P Jan 4 '13 at 0:34

I agree that using the Spring collections is probably the easiest way. However there may be reasons to not use them (already using Generics.Collections all over the place).

So here is how to make a new type that extends TEnumerable<T> with a function Max: T.

type
  Enumerable<T> = record
  private
    source: TEnumerable<T>;
  public
    function Max: T;

    class operator Implicit(const value: TEnumerable<T>): Enumerable<T>;
  end;

class operator Enumerable<T>.Implicit(
  const value: TEnumerable<T>): Enumerable<T>;
begin
  Result.source := value;
end;

function Enumerable<T>.Max: T;
var
  default: IComparer<T>;
  x, y: T;
  flag: Boolean;
begin
  if not Assigned(source) then
    raise EArgumentNilException.Create('Source');
  default := TComparer<T>.Default;

  flag := False;
  for x in source do
  begin
    if flag then
    begin
      if default.Compare(x, y) > 0 then
        y := x;
    end
    else
    begin
      y := x;
      flag := True;
    end;
  end;
  if flag then
    Result := y
  else
    raise EListError.Create('source is empty');
end;

The code is basically a port of the .Net Enumerable.Max<T> extension method from System.Linq. You can use it just like in Nicks example.

The interesting thing for those interested in their binary size: linker is able to remove the methods that are never used.

share|improve this answer

Here's an alternative answer: Use the Spring.Collections.pas unit from the Spring4D framework: (found here: http://code.google.com/p/delphi-spring-framework/)

program ListEnumerableDemo;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses 
    System.SysUtils 
  , Spring.Collections;

var 
  List: IList<Integer>; 
  Enumerable: IEnumerable<Integer>;

begin 
  try 
    List := TCollections.CreateList<Integer>; 
    List.AddRange([1,6,2,9,54,3,2,7,9,1]);

    Enumerable := List; 
    WriteLn(Enumerable.Max); 
    ReadLn; 
  except 
    on E: Exception do 
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message); 
  end; 
end. 
share|improve this answer
2  
+1, for using ENumerable<T> as it is not a TList<T> problem at all. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jan 6 '13 at 11:24
1  
Since IList<T> inherits from IEnumerable<T>, we can use List.Max without casting it to IEnumerable<T> :) –  Baoquan Zuo Jan 7 '13 at 3:09
    
@Jeroen I don't understand that comment at all. The answer uses a generic list. Just not the variant from Generics.Collections. –  David Heffernan Jan 7 '13 at 8:11
1  
In Spring, many more than just IList exposes IEnumerable<T>. That's the crux of Nick's answer. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jan 7 '13 at 8:15
    
@Nick How does IEnumerable<Integer>.Max handle an empty container? –  David Heffernan Jan 7 '13 at 11:31

Using for .. in:

function GetMaximum(AList: TList<Integer>): Integer;
var
  I: Integer
begin
  Assert(AList.Count > 0);
  Result := Low(Integer);
  for I in AList do
    if I > Result then
      Result := I;
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
Can this be done in a way that is equivalently powerful to having IEnumerable in .net? In other words, could you make a Generic implementation for GetMaximum, using generics/traits? –  Warren P Jan 3 '13 at 14:25
    
For example: drbob42.com/examines/examinA6.htm –  Warren P Jan 3 '13 at 14:25
1  
@Warren -- the Spring.Collections.pas unit has IEnumerable<T> which would make this a breeze. –  Nick Hodges Jan 3 '13 at 22:27

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