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I am trying to get the standard example "echo" client/server application to run as quickly as possible and I am sure that the network is a limiting factor. I have a 1 gigabit network card and when I use resource monitor I am only getting 7 megabit out of the client.

I understand the basics of sockets, message framing and length indicators, receiving all bytes indicated by the length indicator. Keep alive packets, half open connections etc.

I started out using stock standard socket operations and then switched to using async. (I didn't change the send to async because someone [who seemed knowledgeable said it shouldn't have any impact]) I have the exact same performance and I can only think that all the material was assuming that I some other work that could be done on the same thread. But in my quick test I had dedicated 1 thread to conterminously spin in a loop sending and another completely different thread to receive.

I have tried everything and am completely lost as to where I can get more performance. I used IPerf and that reported back speeds of 1 gigabit per second and resource monitor also showed that to be chewing up the bandwidth.

Even if someone can maybe point me in the direction of a more complete example. Most of the ones I have come across are trivial or incomplete.

Here is the general code.

class Program
{
private static Socket sock;
private static BlockingCollection<string> queue;
private static int bytesReceived;
private static byte[] dataBuffer;
private static readonly byte[] lengthBuffer = new byte[4];

private static byte[] PrependLengthIndicator(byte[] data)
{
    return BitConverter.GetBytes(data.Length).Concat(data).ToArray();
}

private static void Receive()
{
    if (dataBuffer == null)
    {
        sock.BeginReceive(lengthBuffer, 0, 4, SocketFlags.None, ReceiveCallback, null);
    }
    else
    {
        sock.BeginReceive(dataBuffer, 0, bytesReceived, SocketFlags.None, ReceiveCallback, null);
    }
}

private static void ReceiveCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
{
    bytesReceived += sock.EndReceive(ar);
    if (dataBuffer == null)
    {
        // Currently receiving length indicator
        if (bytesReceived >= 4)
        {
            var length = BitConverter.ToInt32(lengthBuffer, 0);
            dataBuffer = new byte[length];
            bytesReceived = 0;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if (bytesReceived == dataBuffer.Length)
        {
            // Finished reading
            var request = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(dataBuffer);
            dataBuffer = null;
            bytesReceived = 0;
            queue.Add(request);
        }
    }
    ContinueReading();
}

private static void ContinueReading()
{
    // Read into the appropriate buffer: length or data
    if (dataBuffer != null)
    {
        sock.BeginReceive(dataBuffer, bytesReceived, dataBuffer.Length - bytesReceived, SocketFlags.None, ReceiveCallback, null);
    }
    else
    {
        sock.BeginReceive(lengthBuffer, bytesReceived, lengthBuffer.Length - bytesReceived, SocketFlags.None, ReceiveCallback, null);
    }
}

}

Here is the server portion:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
        var listenSock = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
        listenSock.Bind(new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Parse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["LocalIp"]), 3333));
        listenSock.Listen(10);
        Console.WriteLine("Server started...");
        sock = listenSock.Accept();
        Console.WriteLine("Connection accepted.");

        queue = new BlockingCollection<string>();
        Receive();
        var count = 0;
        var sender = new Thread(() =>
            {
                while (true)
                {
                    var bar = queue.Take() + "Resp";
                    count++;
                    var resp = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(bar);
                    var toSend = PrependLengthIndicator(resp);
                    if (count % 10000 == 0)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(bar);
                    }
                    sock.Send(toSend);
                }
            });
        sender.Start();
    }

Here is the client portion:

static void Main(string[] args)
{

    sock = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
        Console.WriteLine("Connecting...");
        sock.Connect(IPAddress.Parse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["EndPointIp"]), 3333);
        Console.WriteLine("Connected.");
        Receive();

        var count = 0;
        while(true)
        {
            count++;
            var foo = "Echo-" + count;
            var data = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(foo);
            var toSend = PrependLengthIndicator(data);
            sock.Send(toSend);
        }
    }
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1 Answer

You are sending tiny messages. Think about how many millions of them you would need to saturate a 1 Gbit/sec link. Each call to a socket burns CPU.

Send bigger messages. Also, try not to allocate new buffers all the time. Don't use Enumerable.Concat to concatenate byte buffers because that operates byte-by-byte in a horribly inefficient way. Use Array.Copy with preallocated arrays.

If you are using very few threads switch to synchronous IO as it will be faster (really! it has less overhead).

You can confirm that this answer is correct by running a dumb infinite send loop that just sends buffers of 64KB synchronously all the time. It will saturate the link.

share|improve this answer
    
I was using linq and concat because I thought the network would definitely be the bottle neck and not the CPU. When I run the tests the CPU stays really low. I did mention in the post that I originally had just used normal synchronous IO with a dedicated to send and one to receive. I will try to to make buffers of 64K and continuously send those. BTW, in my real world application most of the requests will be about 50 bytes and the responses maybe 70-80 bytes. With this in mind how could I go about maximizing the throughput. –  uriDium Jan 3 '13 at 14:29
    
@uriDium with small messages you can only improve throughput by pipelining them (not waiting for the response). At 1ms roundtrip time you can only wait 1000 times per second. That gets you nowhere. –  usr Jan 3 '13 at 14:30
    
I have found comparisons of some WCF implementations and there the guys are getting 40 K 1 way ops per second. 25K two way operations per second. I am maxing out at about 10K per second. This is what prompted this whole investigation of mine. Do you have any idea how I can get similar performance? –  uriDium Jan 3 '13 at 14:30
    
My code above does do any waiting on the response. They are pipe-lined or have a missed something completely? –  uriDium Jan 3 '13 at 14:31
    
@uriDium 1. looking more thoroughly at your code it looks like what you are saying should be true. Pipelining should work.; 2. You are sending over a physical link, right? (Not loopback).; 3. How much CPU exactly do client and server burn? Do they saturate a single CPU core?; 4. Your client is sending unthrottled and the responses it receives pile up in the queue. Maybe this has a "choking" effect because the GC runs too often and has to scan a giant heap. Try not writing to the queue on the client.; 5. Try setting the nagling setting to true or false and see if it makes a difference. –  usr Jan 3 '13 at 14:44
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