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I need a fast algorithm which will generate all possible numbers upto a given number N in binary into an array.

e.g N=3
Then the array should be {0,0,0},{0,0,1}.....{1,1,1}
N<=17. 

I have tried this so far which is a recursive solution.

void print_digits(int n, std::string const& prefix = "") {
    if (!n) {
        printf("%s,",prefix.c_str());
        return;
    }
    print_digits(n-1, prefix + '0');
    print_digits(n-1, prefix + '1');
}

i need a better algorithm.

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7  
You'll get a better response if you try writing some code yourself then post more specific questions –  simonc Jan 3 '13 at 14:08
5  
for (int i=0; i<n; i++) a[i] = i; –  larsmans Jan 3 '13 at 14:10
1  
What's you definition of fast? If N<=17, you would need a char array of size 17*2^17, so it's only 119KiB and you can easily build it at compile time. –  William Pursell Jan 3 '13 at 14:13
    
i do not understand why are there 3 downvotes for this question...i feel the question is well explained and i have even provided my code which means i did try it before asking??...somebody please explain! –  doctore Feb 9 '13 at 11:57
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

All the integers in C++ are stored directly in memory as their binary representation. Thus, if you just want to store N numbers, you should just write them directly into an array "as-is"

std::vector<unsigned> Numbers;
// if N is length of the number, calculate the maximum as 2^N - 1
long long Max = 1 << N - 1;
for (unsinged i = 0; i < Max; ++i)
    Numbers.push_back(i);

If you want to write them in the binary representation, it's also pretty straightforward, even if you want to code it all by yourself. (Please excuse me, as this is just an simple example implementation)

void PrintAsBits(unsigned value) {
    for (int i = sizeof(unsigned) * 8 - 1; i >= 0; --i)
        cout << ((1 << i) & value) ? 1 : 0;
    cout << '\n';
}
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Just in case anyone cares anymore, the following code implements the original spec, which calls for a way to populate a 2-dimensional array where each value is represented as a numeric array whose elements correspond to its value's binary digits, in big-endian order.

#include <iostream>

static const int DIGIT_COUNT = 10;

static const int VALUE_COUNT = 1 << DIGIT_COUNT;
unsigned char g_binarray[VALUE_COUNT][DIGIT_COUNT];

void Populate() {
    for(int i=0; i<VALUE_COUNT; ++i) {
        unsigned char (&curr)[DIGIT_COUNT] = g_binarray[i];
        for(int di=0; di<DIGIT_COUNT; ++di) {
            curr[di] = unsigned char((i >> (DIGIT_COUNT - 1 - di)) & 1);
        }
    }
}

void DumpArray() {
    static const char *digits = "01";
    for(int i=1; i<VALUE_COUNT; ++i) {
        for(int di=0; di<DIGIT_COUNT; ++di) {
            std::cout << digits[!!g_binarray[i][di]];
        }
        std::cout << "    " << i << std::endl;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    Populate();
    DumpArray();
    return 0;
}
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As I wrote in 1 post:

Example: If you need of length 4, then you must have 2^4 = 16 different arrays.

You can use this simple Java code to generate all arrays:

for (int i=0; i < 16; i++) {
        System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(i));
}

The output of this:

0 1 10 11 100 101 110 111 1000 1001 1010 1011 1100 1101 1110 1111

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I didn't downvote. But isn't the question tagged C and C++? –  Mysticial Jan 18 '13 at 15:46
    
Isn't the question tagged algorithm? –  xsiraul Jan 20 '13 at 9:23
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