Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After creating a random forest, I use it to predict against a out of sample test data set. However, consecutive calls to predict produce different results:

pred<-predict(rf, test)
pred1<-predict(rf, test)
which(pred!=pred1)
[1]  327  436  492  555  560  738 1264 1336 1339 1521 1772 1775 1780 1820 1826
[16] 2018 2019 2022 2023 2031 2099 2104 2238 2267 2621 3021 3029 3376 3467

Any ideas on how I'm making this non deterministic?

share|improve this question
2  
Unless you provide an example that we can run that reproduces this behavior, all we can do is guess wildly. Does your forest have an even or odd number of trees? –  joran Jan 3 '13 at 15:05
1  
@joran even, which I think answers the question. Just saw this in the documentation for randomForest "NOTE2: Any ties are broken at random, so if this is undesirable, avoid it by using odd number ntree in randomForest()." Thanks. –  allen Jan 3 '13 at 15:11
    
Go ahead and write that up as an answer yourself and accept it then, just to make sure this question gets marked as answered. –  joran Jan 3 '13 at 15:17
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When using an even number of trees, results are expected to be non deterministic. From the randomForest doc:

NOTE2: Any ties are broken at random, so if this is undesirable, avoid it by using odd number ntree in randomForest().

So if consistent results are desired an odd number of trees must be used.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.