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For example:

object1 = function() {
  console.log('action1');
}

object2 = function() {
  console.log('action2');
}

object1(); //should log "action1"
object2(); //I need this to log "action1" and "action2"

I also need object2 to be able to override object1's methods, so the above is nowhere close (doesn't contain methods);

Here are solutions I have thought of that I'm not looking for:

object2 =     object2 = function() {
  object1(); //this won't allow me to override object1's methods. THIS IS IMPORTANT!!
  console.log('action2');
}

and here's an attempt to build and utilize only blueprints (prototype):

object1 = function() {};
object1.prototype.action1 = function() {
  console.log('action1');
}

object2 = function() {};

object2.prototype = new object1();
object2.prototype.constructor = object2;

//object2.prototype.action1 = function() { //I can overwrite the inherited action here
//  console.log('actionCHANGED');
//}
object2.prototype.action2 = function() {
  console.log('action2');
}

var foo = new object2(); //new object1(); will do object1's actions instead, as desired.

for (var method in foo) { //run all of foo's methods
foo[method]();
}

but this doesn't really work, either. It generally runs the functions out of order (for obvious reasons.)

I've tried a few other approaches with extending and never get quite what I'm looking for. I can't think of the example at the moment, but one of the other ways made object2 do exactly what I want, but object1 only had a prototype function, therefore "new object1()" didn't cause anything to happen. Moving the function to object1's actual function would cause it's action to run when object2 inherits from it, which also isn't good in this case.

My whole approach may need to change. I am open to ideas. The real-life purpose of this is that I am re-writing my unorganized, procedural style youtube plugin. I would like to be able to call it easily and change the way it works.

$('selector').youtubePlayer({type:'basic'}) //like object1
$('selector').youtubePlayer({type:'withThumbs'}) //like object2
$('selector').youtubePlayer({type:'allFeatures'}) //even more complex object

but jQuery isn't the important detail here...it needs to work as simply without it. Like:

youtubePlayer(selector, type);

or

new youtubePlayer(selector, type);

So...there we have it. Please help (and excuse) my ignorance. I have been trying very hard to learn this. Thanks!

Edit: Here's exactly what I'm doing with this.

REAL-LIFE EXAMPLE: object1(or function 1) has 2 methods(functions). object1's first function is to attach a div to the selector. object1's second function is to load the youtube api. The youtube player will load in the above div when the api loads.

object2 has 2 methods. object2's first functions is to get a youtube playlist feed from the cache if possible, otherwise get the feed from youtube and save it to the cache. object2's second function is to display thumbnails from the feed

object3 has even more functionality in the same manner and totally depends on object2's functions to run before object3's.

If I want just object 1's actions, I'd like to just write "object1();" or "new object1(); and so on for each object.

share|improve this question
    
I think you have to provide a better example. I have difficulties to understand your actual problem. –  Felix Kling Jan 3 '13 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's been a while and I've learned a lot of about inheritance and am familiar with several patterns. I thought I'd share in case it will help someone. Below is the pattern I was looking for. Here is an article that explains it: http://blog.javascriptroom.com/2013/01/21/the-initializer-pattern/

To see it in action, click here: http://jsbin.com/orijaz/2/edit

var foo = {
  run: function() {
    this.action1();
    this.action2();
  },
  action1: function() {
    console.log('action1 '+this.objName);
  },
  action2: function() {
    console.log('action2 '+this.objName);
  },
  objName: 'foo'
};

var bar = Object.create(foo);
bar.run = function() {
  this.first();
  foo.run.call(this);
  this.last();
};
bar.first = function() {
  console.log('first '+this.objName);
};
bar.last = function() {
  console.log('last '+this.objName);
};
bar.objName = 'bar';

foo.run();
bar.run();

Old Answer:

var object1 = function() {};
//NEW METHODS
  object1.prototype.action1 = function () { console.log('action1'); };
  object1.prototype.action2 = function () { console.log('action2'); };

  object1.prototype.run = function() {
    this.action1();
    this.action2();
  };

var object2 = function() {};
  //INHERIT
  object2.prototype = new object1();
  //MODIFY METHODS
  object2.prototype.action2 = function() {
    console.log('action2 changed!!'); 
  };
  //NEW METHODS
  object2.prototype.action3 = function () { console.log('action3'); };

  object2.prototype.run = function() {
    object1.prototype.run.call(this);
    this.action3();
  };

object1.prototype.run(); //I do the basic 2 actions
object2.prototype.run(); //I do the basic 2 actions with any changes made, then my own new actions
share|improve this answer

You can simply use straight prototypal inheritance.

Create a class definition A:

function A() {}
A.prototype.action = function() {
  console.log('A::action');
}

Create a class definition B, which inherits from A:

function B() {}
B.prototype = new A();
B.prototype.constructor = B;
B.prototype.action = function() {
  B.prototype.action.call(this);
  console.log('B::action');
}

Then create the appropriate instances:

var a = new A();
var b = new B();

a.action(); // A::action
b.action(); // A::action, B::action

Of course, you could use the lightweight inheritance model library Fiber.js instead, at https://github.com/linkedin/Fiber, which abstracts all the bootstrapping of inheritance for you

var A = Fiber.extend(function() {
  return {
    action: function() {
      console.log('A::action');
    }
  }
});

var B = A.extend(function(base) {
  return {
    action: function() {
      base.action.call(this);
      console.log('B::action');
    }
  }
});

var a = new A();
var b = new B();

a.action(); // A::action
b.action(); // A::action, B::action
share|improve this answer

I'm not sure, but do you just want to call the object1's action1 method in the overwritten method?

object2.prototype.action1 = function() {
  object1.prototype.action1.call(this);
  console.log('actionCHANGED');
}
share|improve this answer
    
I may totally misunderstand your response, but I don't think this would help me at all. –  m59 Jan 3 '13 at 16:14
    
I may have totally misunderstood your question... –  Felix Kling Jan 3 '13 at 16:16
    
I edited my post to include more details about my project. Lee's response might work out, but I'll be glad to hear your thoughts also! –  m59 Jan 3 '13 at 16:29

I've used this code, Inheritance Manager, which works really well for my current project.

I'd played around with other solutions but none seemed to offer the ability to call base class code and override methods, etc.

The code on the site should be straightforward. Let me know if you need further examples.

Here is the version I've got, renamed to fit my project's style:

_inheritanceManager = {};
_inheritanceManager.extend = function(subClass, baseClass) 
{
    function inheritance() { }
    inheritance.prototype = baseClass.prototype;
    subClass.prototype = new inheritance();
    subClass.prototype.constructor = subClass;
    subClass.baseConstructor = baseClass;
    subClass.superClass = baseClass.prototype;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks cool. I'll try it out when I get a chance. Thanks! –  m59 Jan 3 '13 at 16:27
    
@m59 No worries. Look at the examples and then let me know if anything is none-to-clear. I had to play around until I was happy. –  Lee Taylor Jan 3 '13 at 16:29
    
The example is very similar to something I've tried. I noted my issues in this code: pastebin.com/3t7A6st8 –  m59 Jan 3 '13 at 18:57
    
@m59 I'm not sure I follow what it is you're trying to achieve. You can either override your constructor completely, call the base constructor only, or a combination of the two. If you want to change the order of the logging (in your example), then you would need to split up the logging into functions OR send in parameters into the constructor to indicate which logs to call, etc. But without a concrete example of what you're trying to achieve, it's hard to know what to advise. Regards. –  Lee Taylor Jan 3 '13 at 19:40
    
I have a solution working. I'd love to hear your thoughts on my answer below! –  m59 Jan 10 '13 at 20:55

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