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I have a question that could use a theoretical answer.

I'm searching over a large, 100+TB volume for all files with a specific attribute. To do this, I've been using the "find" command, since it does everything that I want.

That is, except run in a reasonable amount of time. I realize that traversing a huge filesystem will be time-consuming in any case, but a possible solution occurred to me.

What if one would just use ls and grep if possible, recursively? Note: the code below isn't meant to be syntactically correct. It's only for illustration.

my_ls{
    # get a listing of all files in the directory passed
    var=`ls -lsa $1`
    # iterate over each file/directory returned by ls
    for each file/directory in $var
        if $each is a directory
            my_ls $each
    done
    # search the lines output from ls for the attributes
    echo $var | grep $searchstring
}

Would this idea be faster overall than find for a large filesystem? The memory requirements could potentially get large quickly, but not too much so. It might also be possible to parallelize this, and offload the threads to a GPU for faster processing (not in bash I know, but in general).

Edit: Yes, I am quite dim for suggesting paralleization of an io-bound operation in most cases.

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closed as off topic by Eugene Mayevski 'EldoS Corp, Mark, Explosion Pills, ig0774, François Wahl Jan 3 '13 at 18:09

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4  
So your question is . . . rather than using the existing find, would it be faster to re-implement find as a shell script? It seems like the answer is obviously "no". What leads you to think that it might be "yes"? –  ruakh Jan 3 '13 at 16:27
1  
GPUs are fast at crunching numbers (I have a feeling that it isn't even possible for them to access the hard drive). Your bottleneck will be your filesystem and the hard drive read speed. Also, why are you looking through your files? Are you trying to find a specific file? –  Blender Jan 3 '13 at 16:27
    
The actual case I'm looking at is to find all files owned by a user. Using grep to find the username in ls -lsa was the first thing I thought of. –  jyaworski Jan 3 '13 at 16:31
    
Ruakh, a simple "no" would have sufficed. I have no idea how find is actually implemented. –  jyaworski Jan 3 '13 at 16:31
2  
@jyaworski: Have you looked at find -user username? –  Blender Jan 3 '13 at 16:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I strongly suspect the overhead of spawning processes repeatedly would far outweigh how much resource a find would take. You should consider where the resource bottleneck is, and for navigating a filesystem, it's going to be the disk access. The CPU will be negligible.

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True, these are HDDs most likely. Would the same be true for SSDs? –  jyaworski Jan 3 '13 at 17:57
    
Quite likely. The process still has to access memory off-CPU and there's lots of circuitry inbetween the CPU and the actual memory stored on the SSD. As ever, measurement is key. –  Brian Agnew Jan 3 '13 at 18:53
    
SSD would give you a much wider bottleneck, of course, but Brian is right: you'd still be IO bound. That would probably be true even with a memory-resident filesystem. –  Soup d'Campbells Jan 3 '13 at 19:19

Using ls and grep is not only slower (adding overhead for forking, waiting, reading and writing to the pipeline, etc); it's also incorrect.

See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs for a description of why using ls in scripts is evil (in the "causes bugs, some of them security-exploitable" sense).

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Wow. That's quite interesting. I only recently started writing bash scripts, and I'll definitely have to see about using find for these purposes. It's probably faster too, if these other answers are an indication. –  jyaworski Jan 3 '13 at 17:56

I'm guessing no. Both are synchronous operations, but you have to start up a whole new process to recurse, which has its own overhead. If you're looking to spead up the operation, I would suggest using a map/reduce model.

Typically map/reduce is used when parsing file or database contents, but the idea can be adapted to your situation. Here's an introduction to map/reduce: http://www-01.ibm.com/software/data/infosphere/hadoop/mapreduce/


EDIT:

As many have noted here, this is an IO bound process, and the typical implementation of map/reduce is a parallel system with many mappers and reducers, but this doesn't mean you can't benefit from splitting your task into a map function and a reduce function. The map/reduce model is still useful.

For what I'm proposing, the mapper should be one thread which recursively finds all files under a specified path. The reducer then evaluates whether the file is owned by the right user (or whatever predicate you have).

This decouples the IO from the evaluation, meaning the IO thread is never pausing to evaluate. This might only save you a microsecond per file, but on a large filesystem it could add up to significant savings.

What I'm describing is not EXACTLY the map/reduce people know and are comfortable with, but it's similar enough to be a useful starting point.

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I'll look into this. Thanks a lot. I've heard of MapReduce previously. –  jyaworski Jan 3 '13 at 17:52
    
@Soup - I'm really not clear on why that would help here; after all, this is an IO-bound operation, so trying to parallelize runs the risk of simply creating more seek() calls, reducing performance. Could you expound? –  Charles Duffy Jan 3 '13 at 18:01
    
Yeah, it made less sense the more I thought about it, but, in theory: the mapper should be one thread which recursively finds all files under a specified path. The reducer then evaluates whether the file is owned by the right user (or whatever predicate you have). This decouples the IO from the evaluation, meaning the IO thread is never pausing to evaluate. This might only save you a microsecond per file, but on a large filesystem it could add up to significant savings. To your point, however, the number of seek calls would go up if you had multiple mappers. –  Soup d'Campbells Jan 3 '13 at 19:08
    
I know what I described is not EXACTLY the map/reduce model, but it's similar enough to be useful. Also, the multiple mappers problem becomes less of one if you're working with multiple hard disks (sharding/raiding), as is common in setups with significant storage capacity. The absolute best solution, however, would be to find a 100+ TB SSD. They have, those, right? </kidding> –  Soup d'Campbells Jan 3 '13 at 19:12

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