Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to export a collection of items in camel casing, for this I use a wrapper.

The class itself:

[XmlRoot("example")]
public class Example
{
    [XmlElement("exampleText")]
    public string ExampleText { get; set; }
}

This serializes fine:

<example>
    <exampleText>Some text</exampleText>
</example>

The wrapper:

[XmlRoot("examples")]
public class ExampleWrapper : ICollection<Example>
{
    [XmlElement("example")]
    public List<Example> innerList;

    //Implementation of ICollection using innerList
}

This however capitalizes the wrapped Examples for some reason, I tried to override it with XmlElement but this doesn't seem to have the desired effect:

<examples>
    <Example>
        <exampleText>Some text</exampleText>
    </Example>
    <Example>
        <exampleText>Another text</exampleText>
    </Example>
</examples>

Who can tell me what I am doing wrong or if there is an easier way?

share|improve this question
    
You could always rename the Example type to example as a workround... If you can stand to break the conventions... –  RichardTowers Jan 3 '13 at 17:15
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that XmlSerializer has built-in handling for collection types, meaning it it will ignore all your properties and fields (including innerList) if your type happens to implement ICollection and will just serialize it according to its own rules. However, you can customize the name of the element it uses for the collection items with the XmlType attribute (as opposed to the XmlRoot that you had used in your example):

[XmlType("example")]
public class Example
{
    [XmlElement("exampleText")]
    public string ExampleText { get; set; }
}

That will have the desired serialization.

See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms950721.aspx, specifically the answer to the question "Why aren't all properties of collection classes serialized?"

share|improve this answer
    
You are correct sir! Thanks. I've discarded the implementation of ICollection in favor of inheritance from List. It seems that XmlRoot isn't needed, am I right? –  siebz0r Jan 3 '13 at 17:52
    
Correct, XmlRoot would only be necessary on Example if you were using that as the root of your serialized object graph. –  luksan Jan 3 '13 at 17:54
add comment

Unfortunately, you cannot use just attributes to make this happen. You need to also use attribute overrides. Using you classes from above, I can use the XmlTypeAttribute to override the string representation of the class.

var wrapper = new ExampleWrapper();
var textes = new[] { "Hello, Curtis", "Good-bye, Curtis" };
foreach(var s in textes)
{
    wrapper.Add(new Example { ExampleText = s });
}

XmlAttributeOverrides overrides = new XmlAttributeOverrides();
XmlAttributes attributes = new XmlAttributes();
XmlTypeAttribute typeAttr = new XmlTypeAttribute();
typeAttr.TypeName = "example";
attributes.XmlType = typeAttr;
overrides.Add(typeof(Example), attributes);

XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ExampleWrapper), overrides);
using(System.IO.StringWriter writer = new System.IO.StringWriter())
{
    serializer.Serialize(writer, wrapper);
    Console.WriteLine(writer.GetStringBuilder().ToString());
}

This gives

<examples>
  <example>
    <exampleText>Hello, Curtis</exampleText>
  </example>
  <example>
    <exampleText>Good-bye, Curtis</exampleText>
  </example>
</examples>

which I believe you wanted.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.