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I'm trying to join two datasets together. Call them x and y. I believe that the ID variables in y are a subset of the ID variables in x. But not in the pure sense because I know that x contains more IDs than y but I don't know the mapping. That is, some (but not all) of the IDs in x and y can be matched 1:1.

My ultimate goal is to figure out where this 1:1 mapping fails and flag these observations. I thought merge would be the way to go but maybe not. An example is below:

id <- c(1:10, 1:100)

X1 <- rnorm(110, mean = 0, sd = 1)
year <- c("2004","2005","2006","2001","2002") 
year <- rep(year, 22)

month = c("Jul","Aug","Sep","Oct","Nov","Dec","Jan","Feb","Mar","Apr")
month <- rep(month, 11)

#dataset X
x <- cbind(id, X1, month, year)

#dataset Y
id2 <- c(1:10, 200)
Y1 <- rnorm(11, mean = 0 , sd = 1)
y <- cbind(id2,Y1)

#merge on the IDs; but we get an error because when id2 == 200 in y we don't 
#have a match in x 
result <- merge(x, y, by.x="id", by.y = "id2", all =TRUE)

The merge threw an error because id2 == 200 had no match in the x dataset. Unfortunately, I lost the ID and all the information as well! (it should equal 200 in row 111):

tail(result) 
      id                   X1 month year         Y1
106   95  -0.0748386054887876   Nov 2002         NA
107   96    0.196765325477989   Dec 2004         NA
108   97    0.527922135906927   Jan 2005         NA
109   98    0.197927230533413   Feb 2006         NA
110   99 -0.00720474886698309   Mar 2001         NA
111 <NA>                 <NA>  <NA> <NA> -0.9664941

What's more, I get duplicate observations on the ID variable in the merged file. The id2 == 1 observation only existed once but it just copied it twice (e.g. Y1 takes on the value 1.55 twice).

head(result)
   id                 X1 month year       Y1
1   1  -0.67371266313441   Jul 2004 1.553220
2   1 -0.318666983469993   Jul 2004 1.553220
3  10 -0.608192898092431   Apr 2002 1.234325
4  10  -0.72299929212347   Apr 2002 1.234325
5 100 -0.842111221826554   Apr 2002       NA
6  11  -0.16316681842082   Jul 2004       NA

This merge has made things more complicated than I intended. I was hoping I could examine every observation in x and figure out where the id matched id2 in y and flag the ones that didn't. So I would get a new vector, call it flag, that takes on a value 1 if x$id had a match in y$id2 and zero otherwise. This way, I could know where the 1:1 mapping failed. I could potentially get some traction on this by re-coding the NAs, but what about the error that gets thrown when id2 == 200? It just discards the information.

I have tried appending by rows with no luck and it looks like I should give up merge as well, perhaps it's better to wring a loop or function to do something along these lines:

for every observation in x

id2 = which(id2) corresponds to id-month-year

flag = 1 if length of above is == 1, 0 otherwise

etc.

Hopefully this all makes sense. I'd be very grateful for any help or guidance.

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cbind creates matrices, not data frames. Your calls to create x and y should be x <- data.frame(id,X1,month,year) and y <- data.frame(id2,Y1). –  Blue Magister Jan 3 '13 at 16:30
    
You are getting two observations for y$id2 == 1 because there are two rows in x where x$id == 1. If the merge sees multiple observations that match the join criteria, it will create a row for each possible combination. This is by design and is very useful. –  Blue Magister Jan 4 '13 at 2:45
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you are looking for which things in x$id are in y$id2, then you can use

x$id %in% y$id2

to get a logical vector returning matches. It does not guarantee a 1-to-1 correspondence, however; just a 1-to-many. You can then add this vector to your data frame

x$match.y <- x$id %in% y$id2

to see what rows of x have a corresponding ID in y.

To see which observations are 1-to-1, you could do something like

y$id2[duplicated(y$id2)] #vector of duplicate elements in y$id2
(x$id %in% y$id2) & !(x$id %in% y$id2[duplicated(y$id2)])

to filter out elements that appear more than once in y$id2. You can also add this to x:

x$match.y.unique <- (x$id %in% y$id2) & !(x$id %in% y$id2[duplicated(y$id2)])

The same procedure can be done for y to determine what rows of y match in x, and which ones match uniquely.

share|improve this answer
    
duplicated returns a boolean vector. You want y$id2[duplicated(y$id2)] –  Matthew Plourde Jan 3 '13 at 16:40
    
Right on! I realized my mistake and spent a couple minutes at the edit screen trying to remember the right syntax. Thanks for the catch. –  Blue Magister Jan 3 '13 at 16:43
    
Thanks! It looks like this option doesn't work well when y$id2 == 200 and does not have a match in x$id. It should be false but comes up true: test <- (x$id %in% y$id2) & !(x$id %in% y$id2[duplicated(y$id2)]) test <- data.frame(x,y,test) test[1:20,]# first 20 rows In row 11, we have id2 corresponding to id which is not a 1:1 and should be 'FALSE' but comes up 'TRUE'. Then all the subsequent lines are messed up. So we have 2 == 1 = TRUE in row 12, etc. –  hubert_farnsworth Jan 4 '13 at 2:21
    
The vector I propose in the solution is a logical vector telling which elements of x$id can be matched uniquely and in a 1-to-1 manner with an element of y$id2. Consider x$one.to.one <- (x$id %in% y$id2) & !(x$id %in% y$id2[duplicated(y$id2)]) and looking at x afterwards. –  Blue Magister Jan 4 '13 at 2:36
    
Also, I do not think data.frame(x,y,test) does what you think. The data.frame command will just mash its arguments together, not merging by id. Additionally, because y in this instance has fewer rows than x, it gets recycled to fill up the space and so will be repeated 10 times. –  Blue Magister Jan 4 '13 at 2:39
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The reason your merge failed was that you gave it two different structures (one a numeric matrix and the other a character matrix) for x and y. Using cbind when data.frame should be chosen is a common strategy for failure.

> str(x)
 chr [1:110, 1:4] "1" "2" "3" "4" "5" "6" "7" "8" "9" "10" "1" "2" ...
 - attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  ..$ : NULL
  ..$ : chr [1:4] "id" "X1" "month" "year"
> str(y)
 num [1:11, 1:2] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
 - attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  ..$ : NULL
  ..$ : chr [1:2] "id2" "Y1"

If you used the data.frame function (since dataframes are what merge is supposed to be working with) it would have succeeded:

> x <- data.frame(id, X1, month, year); y <- data.frame(id2,Y1)
> str( result <- merge(x, y, by.x="id", by.y = "id2", all =TRUE) )
'data.frame':   111 obs. of  5 variables:
 $ id   : num  1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 ...
 $ X1   : num  1.5063 2.5035 0.7889 -0.4907 -0.0446 ...
 $ month: Factor w/ 10 levels "Apr","Aug","Dec",..: 6 6 2 2 10 10 9 9 8 8 ...
 $ year : Factor w/ 5 levels "2001","2002",..: 3 3 4 4 5 5 1 1 2 2 ...
 $ Y1   : num  1.449 1.449 -0.134 -0.134 -0.828 ...

> tail( result <- merge(x, y, by.x="id", by.y = "id2", all =TRUE) )
     id         X1 month year        Y1
106  96 -0.3869157   Dec 2004        NA
107  97  0.6373009   Jan 2005        NA
108  98 -0.7735626   Feb 2006        NA
109  99 -1.3537915   Mar 2001        NA
110 100  0.2626190   Apr 2002        NA
111 200         NA  <NA> <NA> -1.509818

If you have duplicates in your 'x' argument, then you should get duplicates in the result. It's then your responsibility to use !duplicated in whatever manner you deem appropriate (either before or after the merge), but you cannot expect merge to be making decisions like that for you.

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