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In python's matplotlib.fill_between the following minimal working example below draws correctly to the screen, and to the .png. In the resulting .pdf however, the edge lines are still drawn. How can I fix this?

from numpy import *
import pylab as plt

# Sample data
X  = linspace(0,2*pi,1000)
Y0 = sin(X)
Y1 = sin(X+.2)
Y2 = sin(X+.4)

# fill_kwargs (what am I missing?)
fbk = {'lw':0.0, 'edgecolor':None}

ax = plt.subplot(111)
ax.fill_between(X, 0, Y0 , facecolor = 'b', **fbk)
ax.fill_between(X, Y0, Y1, facecolor = 'g', **fbk)
ax.fill_between(X, Y1, Y2, facecolor = 'r', **fbk)
plt.xlim(pi-.8,pi+.5)
plt.ylim(-.5,.5)

plt.savefig('fA.png')  # No edge lines
plt.savefig('fA.pdf')  # Edge lines!

PNG result

enter image description here

PDF result

enter image description here

While it seems trivial, it becomes extremely problematic when you stack 200 fill_between plots, all you see is an ugly mess of black!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's not perfect, but I've found a solution (and will accept a better one if it comes). Apparently postscript might be to blame:

... note that interpreting a linewidth of zero as a 1 pixel wide line is what PostScript does. So the only way to get a true zero width for PostScript output is to fill the polygon without stroking it.

The solution is to make the edgecolor the same as the facecolor. This works, but if the facecolor has a transparency it seems that the edgecolor does not get that same transparency value.

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