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I have a list of datetime objects and would like to find the ones which are within a certain time frame:

import datetime

dates = [ datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 2, 0, 1),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 3, 0, 2),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 4, 0, 3),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 5, 0, 4),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 6, 0, 5),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 7, 0, 6) ]
#in reality this is a list of over 25000 dates

mask = (dates>datetime.datetime(2007,1,3)) & \
       (dates<datetime.datetime(2007,1,6))

However, this results in the following error: "TypeError: can't compare datetime.datetime to list"

How can I fix my code?

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possible duplicate of python: deleting list elements based on condition –  Don Kirkby Jan 3 '13 at 21:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If your dates list is in sorted order, you can use the bisect module:

>>> import bisect
>>> bisect.bisect_right(dates, datetime.datetime(2007,1,3))
1
>>> bisect.bisect_left(dates, datetime.datetime(2007,1,6))
4

The .bisect_* functions return indices into the dates list:

>>> lower = bisect.bisect_right(dates, datetime.datetime(2007,1,3))
>>> upper = bisect.bisect_left(dates, datetime.datetime(2007,1,6))
>>> mask = dates[lower:upper]
>>> mask
[datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 3, 0, 2), datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 4, 0, 3), datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 5, 0, 4)]
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I would disagree with you: doesn't bisect_left include the element in argument if it is present in the list ? –  Boud Jan 3 '13 at 16:46
    
@Boud: That's the point of using bisect, it's to find the range of datetime objects that fall between the two values. Or do you mean it inserts it into the list? No, it doesn't do that, it simply returns the insertion point; use insort_*() to do that. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 3 '13 at 16:48
    
OP is asking for strict inequality –  Boud Jan 3 '13 at 16:51
    
@Boud: it's easy enough to adjust from _left to _right in that case. I've done so in my update. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 3 '13 at 16:53
    
You were right, it is the fastest method (2.48 us per loop)! Thank you! –  HyperCube Jan 3 '13 at 17:02
import datetime

dates = [ datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 2, 0, 1),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 3, 0, 2),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 4, 0, 3),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 5, 0, 4),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 6, 0, 5),
          datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 7, 0, 6) ]


within = [date for date in dates if datetime.datetime(2007,1,3) < date < datetime.datetime(2007,1,6)]

yields:

[datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 3, 0, 2), 
 datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 4, 0, 3), 
 datetime.datetime(2007, 1, 5, 0, 4)]
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This is even faster (7.82 us per loop), than turning it into a numpy array (approach from hayden) (122 us per loop) –  HyperCube Jan 3 '13 at 16:54
    
@HyperCube: I bet using bisect on a sorted list is even faster though. bisect does not traverse the whole list, it's methods bounded by O(log n) complexity, while this answer requires you to access the whole list (O(n) complexity). –  Martijn Pieters Jan 3 '13 at 16:55
    
However, I need the position in the list. @MartijnPieters: I will try this out next ;) –  HyperCube Jan 3 '13 at 16:57
    
@MartijnPieters - also bisect requires a sorted list. –  Inbar Rose Jan 3 '13 at 18:33
    
@InbarRose: indeed, as I stated in my answer. :-) –  Martijn Pieters Jan 3 '13 at 18:33

You can mask a numpy.array in the syntax you describe (but not a list):

import numpy as np

date1 = np.array(dates)
mask = (dates1 > datetime.datetime(2007,1,3)) & \
       (dates1 < datetime.datetime(2007,1,6))

In [14]: mask
Out[14]: array([False,  True,  True,  True, False, False], dtype=bool)

In [15]: dates1[mask]
Out[15]: array([2007-01-03 00:02:00, 2007-01-04 00:03:00, 2007-01-05 00:04:00], dtype=object)

(since this question is tagged numpy, presumably this is what you were intending.)

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Thank you, that is a very easy workaround! –  HyperCube Jan 3 '13 at 16:48
    
The conversion np.array(dates) of my list of datetime objects to the numpy array takes almost 1 second....is there a faster conversion, since I have to do this repetitively? –  HyperCube Jan 4 '13 at 10:35
    
don't start with a list, what do you have before that? 1s sounds long. I think worth looking into pandas for efficient datetime arrays. (pd.to_datetime(dates)) –  Andy Hayden Jan 4 '13 at 10:46

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