Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this simple code that seems to work (I checked with the debugger) but when the function execration ends, the string is not save in the original variable.

void getString(char *iText);

int main()
{
    char *inputText=malloc(sizeof(char));
    getString(inputText);
    puts(inputText);
    free(inputText);
    system("pause");

    return 0;
}


void getString(char *iText)
{
    char c;
    int i=0;

    while((c=getchar()) != '\n')
    {
        iText = realloc(iText,sizeof(char)*(i+1));
        iText[i]=c;
        i++;
    }

    iText = realloc(iText, sizeof(char)*(i+1));  
    iText[i]='\0';
}

When this little script ends, I see some

ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■ε■▲יע`*

If I write this code in my main function it's working, so i'm guessing it's something in the way I'm using the pointer in the function.

Thanks in advanced.

share|improve this question
2  
Just let getString return the pointer, that's much simpler. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 3 '13 at 16:47
    
Thanks for you advice, I didn't think about this option! –  Itay Jan 3 '13 at 16:57
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

getString takes a pointer by value so cannot change the caller's pointer. Pass a pointer to a pointer if you want to reallocate the string

int main()
{
    ....
    getString(&inputText);
    ....
}

void getString(char **iText)
{
    char c;
    int i=0;
    while((c=getchar()) != '\n')
    {
        *iText = realloc(*iText, i+1);
        (*iText)[i]=c;
        i++;
    }

    *iText = realloc(*iText, i+1);  
    (*iText)[i]='\0';
}

I've made one other small change to your code - sizeof(char) is guaranteed to be 1 so the realloc calculations can be simplified

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I've tired it before but it didn't work as well. Now I tried with the (*iText) as you wrote, and it worked! –  Itay Jan 3 '13 at 16:56
    
@simonc, but if *inputText is a char pointer, then inputText is the address (from whatever rudimentary knowledge of pointers I have), so shouldn't this call actually modify the value at that position? (The answer to which is the OP itself) but I was hoping to clear a few concepts here now that it's up here. –  varevarao Jan 3 '13 at 17:07
    
@varevarao passing char* allows you to modify the contents of a char array. If you want to change the array pointed to, you need a pointer to a char array - char** –  simonc Jan 3 '13 at 17:14
    
@simonc, oh dang! I misunderstood the whole point of the question. For a moment I thought all the programs I wrote using pointers till date were a big lie! :D Thanks. –  varevarao Jan 3 '13 at 17:17
    
Could also have used a reference to pointer: void getString(char *&iText) –  Bok McDonagh Jan 5 '13 at 15:47
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.