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I have a popuplated IEnumerable<User> collection.

I want to remove an item from it, how can I do this?

foreach(var u in users)
{
  if(u.userId = 1123)
  {
    // remove!
  }
}

I know your not suppose to remove while looping, so I don't mind either creating a new collection or removing it after.

But I don't know how to remove an item, kind of lost for some reason on this!

Alternately which I am confused on also, how can I create a new collection like:

IEnumerable<User> modifiedUsers = new List<User>();

foreach(var u in users)
{
   if(u.userId != 1233)
   {
        modifiedUsers.add ??????
   }
}

How can I add to the collection?

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6 Answers 6

With LINQ:

// remove
users = users.Where(u => u.userId != 123).ToList();

// new list
var modified = users.Where(u => u.userId == 123).ToList();
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you can not remove an item from an IEnumerable, it can only be enumerated. As described here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.collections.ienumerable.aspx

You have to use an ICollection if you want to add and remove items, maybe you can try and casting your IEnumerable, this will off course only work if the underlying object implements ICollection.

See here for more on ICollection.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/92t2ye13.aspx

You can off course just create a new list from your IEnumerable, as pointed out by lante, but this might be "sub optimal", depending on your actual use case off course.
ICollection is probably the way to go.

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You can't. IEnumerable<T> can only be iterated.

In your second example, you can remove from original collection by iterating over a copy of it

foreach(var u in users.ToArray()) // ToArray creates a copy
{
   if(u.userId != 1233)
   {
        users.Remove(u);
   }
}
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Try turning the IEnumerable to a List then you can use the List's Remove method to remote the item, and to obtain the item itself so that you can pass it as a param to the Remove method, simply do a .Single(x => x.userId == 1233) or .First(x => x.userId == 1233) to obtain the item.

Like this:

users = users.ToList();
users.Remove(users.First(x => x.userId == 1123));
//DONE!
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but can I assign it to something that expects an ienumerable afterwords? do I have to restart it to the beginning? –  loyalflow Jan 3 '13 at 17:03
    
@user1361315 of course, List implements IEnumerable, so you can indeed assing it to an IEnumerable –  dutzu Jan 3 '13 at 17:54
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The IEnumerable interface is just that, enumerable - it doesn't provide any methods to Add or Remove or modify the list at all.

The interface just provides a way to iterate over some items - most implementations that require enumeration will implement IEnumerable such as List<T>

Why don't you just use your code without the implicit cast to IEnumerable

// Treat this like a list, not an enumerable
List<User> modifiedUsers = new List<User>();

foreach(var u in users)
{
   if(u.userId != 1233)
   {
        // Use List<T>.Add
        modifiedUsers.Add(u);
   }
}
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I have to modify it, then pass it to something that expects a ienumerable. –  loyalflow Jan 3 '13 at 17:04
    
Then modify it and pass it - there is no reason you can't pass a List<T> to a method that's expecting an IEnumerable<T> since List<T> derives from IEnumerable<T>. I don't even think you need a cast due to covariance rules. –  Charleh Jan 3 '13 at 17:06
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You can't remove IEnumerable<T> elements, but you can use the Enumerable.Skip Method

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