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I've created a "holiday" table that has 3 columns [Date] in date format, [BusinessDay] that's a Y/N and [NameofDay] varchar(50) for the Holiday or Weekend. Saturday, Sunday, Christmas are all marked for the next decade.

What I now need to do is figure out how to determine the date a request needs to be completed by not counting the business days. I've read and read and read but don't see anything that has been useful. It's always simple in my head.

What I'm trying to solve: what will the Due Date [DueDate] be 10 business Days from the date of the request [TransactionDate] if the request is "priority", or 5 Business Days if it's "Critical".

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1  
You should create a calendar table rather than a holiday table. A calendar table would have one row per date, with an indicator for holidays, weekends, and so on. This would make it much easier to answer questions such as you have. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 3 '13 at 17:01
    
I see a good answer already, but I thought I'd share these links as well with good info on doing this non-trivial task: capricornexcel.co.uk/calculating-working-days-in-sql and capricornexcel.co.uk/… –  David Stratton Jan 3 '13 at 17:08
    
@GordonLinoff, I can't seem to paste in a sample of my data. Sorry. I do believe I have what you are referring too though. –  donviti Jan 3 '13 at 18:35

3 Answers 3

Due to the recursive nature of the problem that @Andomar has brought up, I am suggesting an alternative answer (which happens to be much simpler as well, but requires windowing functions to be available). What this does is join valid business days from the calendar that are later than TransactionDate, and then for each request id find the 5th or 10th row as required:

;WITH cte AS
(
   SELECT *,
         ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY id ORDER BY validDeliveryDate ASC) AS rn
   FROM (
       SELECT requests.*, holiday.Date as validDeliveryDate
       FROM requests
       JOIN holiday
         ON requests.TransactionDate < holiday.Date
         AND DATEADD(day, 25, requests.TransactionDate) >= holiday.Date
         AND holiday.BusinessDay = 'Y' ) v
)
SELECT *
FROM cte
WHERE rn = CASE WHEN critical = 1 THEN 5 ELSE 10 END

No iteration required - working sqlfiddle here

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But the added days can themselves be holidays. Wrong answer. –  Andomar Jan 3 '13 at 17:07
    
@Andomar, good point - give me a minute to work that out –  PinnyM Jan 3 '13 at 17:08
    
@DavidStratton: Aren't weekends flagged as non-business days in the holiday table? –  PinnyM Jan 3 '13 at 17:12
1  
I don't think this works. Pushing ahead the days requires recursion. So this counts the number of holidays initially, but that might cover more "holidays". –  Gordon Linoff Jan 3 '13 at 17:14
    
@GordonLinoff: yes, that's what Andomar was saying - I'm working on that –  PinnyM Jan 3 '13 at 17:16

Calculating business days requires iteration. You add a number of days, then subtract the non-business days, then add again.

One way to do that is a user-defined function:

if exists (select * from sys.objects where name ='WorkingDaysFrom' and type = 'FN')
    drop function dbo.WorkingDaysFrom
go
create function dbo.WorkingDaysFrom(
        @date date
,       @days int)
returns date
as
begin
        declare @result date = @date
        declare @remaining int = @days
        while @remaining > 0
                begin
                set     @result = dateadd(day, @remaining, @result)
                select  @remaining = count(*) 
                from    dbo.Holiday 
                where   [Date] between dateadd(day, 1-@remaining, @result) and @result
                        and BusinessDay = 'N'
                end
        return @result
end
go

Live example at SQL Fiddle. This prints:

TransactionDate   Priority    DueDate
2013-01-01        Priority    2013-01-16
2013-01-01        Critical    2013-01-09
2013-01-03        Priority    2013-01-17
2013-01-03        Critical    2013-01-10
2013-01-06        Priority    2013-01-18
2013-01-06        Critical    2013-01-11
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+1 much cleaner udf than mine –  bluefeet Jan 3 '13 at 17:33
    
The difference between yours and mine is that my Holiday table only includes the dates where there is a holiday, it doesn't store all dates. –  bluefeet Jan 3 '13 at 17:41
    
@Andomar, why is your first DueDate 01-16? I'm getting 01-15 in my solution, and my math seems right... –  PinnyM Jan 3 '13 at 17:48
1  
@bluefoot: My UDF only uses non-business days, but the OP includes all days in his table. –  Andomar Jan 3 '13 at 17:53
    
@PinnyM: AFAIK 10 working days in the feature means you can deliver on the 11th day. The 10 days are 2,3,4,7,8,9,10,11,14,15 so you deliver on the 16th. –  Andomar Jan 3 '13 at 17:55

I think the following works:

select t.*
from (select t.*,
             row_number() over (partition by r.requestid, IsWorkDay order by seqdate) as WorkDayNum
      from (select r.requestid, r.TransactionDate,
                   (case when critical = 1 then 5 else 10 end) as DaysToRespond,
                   dateadd(day, days.seqnum - 1, r.TransactionDate) as seqdate,
                   (case when h.date is null then 1 else 0 end) as IsWorkDay
            from requests r cross join
                 (select top 20 ROW_NUMBER() over (order by (select NULL)) as seqnum
                  from information_schema.columns
                 ) days left outer join
                 holidays h
                 on dateadd(day, days.seqnum - 1, r.TransactionDate) = h.date
           ) t
     ) t
where WorkDayNum = DaysToRespond and IsWorkDay = 1

This is untested, but here is the idea.

Well, I have tested this, and it appears to return the right result in this case:

with holidays as (
        select CAST('2012-01-01' as date) as date union all
        select CAST('2012-01-05' as date) as date union all
        select CAST('2012-01-06' as date) as date union all
        select CAST('2012-01-12' as date) as date union all
        select CAST('2012-01-13' as date) as date union all
        select CAST('2012-01-19' as date) as date union all
        select CAST('2012-01-20' as date) as date
       ),
      requests as (
        select 1 as requestId, CAST('2012-01-02' as DATE) as TransactionDate, 1 as Critical
      )

select t.*
from (select t.*,
             row_number() over (partition by t.requestid, IsWorkDay order by seqdate) as WorkDayNum
      from (select r.requestid, r.TransactionDate,
                   (case when critical = 1 then 5 else 10 end) as DaysToRespond,
                   dateadd(day, days.seqnum - 1, r.TransactionDate) as seqdate,
                   (case when h.date is null then 1 else 0 end) as IsWorkDay
            from requests r cross join
                 (select top 20 ROW_NUMBER() over (order by (select NULL)) as seqnum
                  from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.columns
                 ) days left outer join
                 holidays h
                 on dateadd(day, days.seqnum - 1, r.TransactionDate) = h.date
           ) t
     ) t
where WorkDayNum = DaysToRespond+1 and IsWorkDay = 1

This query creates a sequence of 20 days following the transaction date (Is 20 enough?). It then calculates the date for these days and compares the date to the holiday table.

To count the number of days is uses row_number() partitioning by the request and workdays versus nonworkdays. The row to choose is the one that is a workday and the number of days after the transaction date.

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Compile error. When I replace r.requestid with t.requestid and holiday.date by h.date, it returns an empty rowset. –  Andomar Jan 3 '13 at 17:36
    
@Andomar . . . Well, i have tested it. The count(*) syntax was dependent on SQL Server 2012, so I changed it to row_number(). And, it does work. I changed the reference in the days subquery to information_schema.columns rather than holidays. If the holidays table has too few rows, then it won't work. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 3 '13 at 18:46
    
SQL Fiddle returns an empty rowset? Not sure what I'm missing. It's set to SQL 2012. –  Andomar Jan 3 '13 at 19:27
    
@Andomar . . . It is because Information_Schema.Columns is empty on SQL Fiddle. This is being used just to create a list of numbers . . . you can replace it with (select 1 as seqnum union all select 2 union all select 3 . . . ). Most databases have at least a few dozen columns, so that is a short-cut for more cumbersome code. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 3 '13 at 19:41
    
Updated version returns just 1 row, and the date is pretty far off! –  Andomar Jan 3 '13 at 19:57

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