Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I sort String array

String[] s = {"0.1","0.3","0.6","0.4","0.5","0.2","0.7","0.8","0.9","0.10"};

By sort I dont mean here Converting it into Integer and get the result as 0.9 .

Here I want to get the value as 0.10 .

Here in this case if the string array contains 1.1 then the max value will be 1.1 .

I am able to get the max value if the array is like this i.e.

String[] s = {"0.1","0.4","0.3","0.4","0.5","0.2","0.7","1.8","2.9","3.1"};

My code will work for this string array but suppose if the

String[] s = {"0.1","1.4","1.3","0.4","0.5","0.2","2.7","1.8","2.9","0.1"};

My code.

public String createNewVersion(
            String[] entityVersionHistory) {

Map<Integer, List<Integer>> m_Map1 = new HashMap<Integer, List<Integer>>(); 

String prevKey = "0";
String currentKey = null;

List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

for (String str : entityVersionHistory) 
{
    String[] splitVersion = str.split("\\.");
    currentKey = splitVersion[0];
    if(!prevKey.equals(currentKey))
    {
        Integer s = new Integer(splitVersion[1]);

        m_Map1.put(Integer.valueOf(prevKey), list);
        list = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        list.add(s);

        prevKey = currentKey;
    }
    else
    {
        Integer s = new Integer(splitVersion[1]);
        list.add(s);
    }
}
m_Map1.put(Integer.valueOf(prevKey), list);

How I can achieve this?

share|improve this question
1  
Why downvote ? If somebody has read the question well , he can only get the difficulty of this problem when he will try this –  vikiiii Jan 3 '13 at 17:09
    
By what criteria are you determining "max"? The only way "0.9" > "0.10" is by length of the string (or, I suppose, by position in your specific array). –  iamnotmaynard Jan 3 '13 at 17:09
    
@vikiii: Why isn't the maximum 0.9? –  Blender Jan 3 '13 at 17:11
    
Maybe you want to do a lexicographical comparison? stackoverflow.com/questions/4064633/string-comparison-in-java –  jco.owens Jan 3 '13 at 17:12
1  
@iamnotmaynard it's about version numbers, so 0.10 > 0.9 –  Alexis Pigeon Jan 3 '13 at 17:12
show 2 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is basically Anny-Mousses answer in code: The restriction is, there are only digits and dots allowed in a version number.

public class Version implements Comparable<Version> {

    private int[] version;

    public Version(String str) {
        if (!str.matches("\\d+[.\\d]*?\\d")) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(
                    "Version must start and end with digit and"
                    + "only contain digits and dots."
                    + " You provided '" + str + "'");
        }
        String[] tokens = str.split("\\.");
        version = new int[tokens.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < tokens.length; i++) {
            version[i] = Integer.parseInt(tokens[i], 10);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Version other) {
        Version shorterOne =
                this.version.length < other.version.length ?
                this : other;
        int min = shorterOne.version.length;
        for (int i = 0; i < min; i++) {
            if (this.version[i] != other.version[i]) {
                return this.version[i] - other.version[i];
            }
        }
        return this.version.length - other.version.length;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder str = new StringBuilder(2 * version.length);
        for (Integer i : version) {
            str.append(i).append('.');
        }
        return str.deleteCharAt(str.length() - 1).toString();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String[] s = {"1.4","1.3","0.4","0.5","0.2","2.7","1.8","2.9","0.1"};
        List<Version> list = new ArrayList<>(s.length);
        for (String str : s) {
            list.add(new Version(str));
        }
        Version max = Collections.max(list);
        System.out.println(max);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
damn, you were quicker, +1 for speed –  user902383 Jan 3 '13 at 17:27
    
@jlordo I am getting error in this line List<Version> list = new ArrayList<>(s.length); . Is this correct? –  vikiiii Jan 3 '13 at 17:35
    
Are you using Java 7? If not, you need List<Version> list = new ArrayList<Version>(s.length); It would be better if you would specify your error. Maybe you are missing import java.util.List; and import java.util.ArrayList; –  jlordo Jan 3 '13 at 17:36
    
Thanks jlordo. Exactly what i needed. But can't it be solved using simpler taking array or a map. –  vikiiii Jan 3 '13 at 19:14
    
IMHO, Collections.max on a Comparable type is pretty simple. And having a Version class follows the OOP principle, so I think my answer is pretty simple. –  jlordo Jan 3 '13 at 19:16
add comment

It's not as easy as you think in general. Because there are version numbers such as 3.1beta, too. I'm not going to discuss these fully below, just sketch a number of challenges that arise.

But the basic idea is as follows:

  1. split the string at . into an array, converting the individual components into integers.

  2. compare component-wise. If two numbers agree on the first component, skip to the next.

So, given the version numbers 3.10.1 and 3.9.2 we convert them first to an array of integers: { 3, 10, 1 } and {3, 9, 2}. Then we test the first component, but 3 == 3, so we skip to the next component. 10 > 9, so the result is that the first is larger.

Now if you want to support beta and similar things, it gets really messy. Take Debian version numbering for examples. In addition to dots, it has an epoch separator. So a verision of 2:1.0 > 2.0 (a new epoch is larger than the previous epochs numbering). A - separates a revision number. So 2-2 < 2.1-1, because 2 < 2.1 (and the revision is secondary to the main version number!). There are also negative versions. So 1.0~beta < 1.0, but 1.0final > 1.0 - read this as "1.0 minus beta" and "1.0 plus final".

There is no unique standard for how these are to be read. There is just the common convention that . separate lower-priority components, while ~ is a popular indicator for pre-releases (which is why it should sort before the non-postfixed version).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 As your answer helps in doing my task early. –  vikiiii Jan 3 '13 at 19:15
add comment

Try as

    Arrays.sort(s, new Comparator<String>() {
        @Override
        public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
            String[] a1 = o1.split("\\.");
            String[] a2 = o2.split("\\.");
            int c1 = Integer.parseInt(a1[0]) - Integer.parseInt(a2[0]);
            if (c1 != 0) {
                return c1;
            }
            return a1[1].compareTo(a2[1]);
        }

    });
share|improve this answer
    
won't work for "1.2.3" vs "1.2.4" –  jlordo Jan 3 '13 at 17:31
    
no it wont, it's only for major.minor format –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Jan 3 '13 at 17:41
add comment

If instead of using Integer.parseInt() ; you would use Double.parseDouble(); you can easily get max value .. I do not see any problem in that

share|improve this answer
3  
when you use that, what will be bigger, "0.1" or "0.10" ? ;) –  jlordo Jan 3 '13 at 17:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.