Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I hope this is the right place to ask this. If not, please advise where the appropriate location is.

Intent: Users will be able to select a year and month from drop down lists. When the form is submitted a chart will be generated to show information based on the choices.

Implementation: My controller creates IEnumerable<SelectListItem> for each drop down list and is stored in a model, which is passed to a view. Within the view is a call to the charting action.

Code:

Controller:

public ActionResult Validate(int month = 0, int year = 0)
    {
        //Check if input is valid
        if (month != 0 && year != 0)
        {
            ViewBag.Valid = 1;
        }
        else
        {
            ViewBag.Valid = 0;
        }
        ValidateVM model = new ValidateVM();

                    //Populate years
        model.year = Enumerable.Range(2008, DateTime.Now.Year - 2007).Reverse()
                        .Select(r => new SelectListItem
                        {
                            Value = r.ToString(),
                            Text = r.ToString()
                        });
                    //Populate months
        string[] months = { "January", "February", "March", "April", "May", "June", "July", "August", "September", "October", "November", "December" };

        model.month = months
                        .Select((r, index) => new SelectListItem { Text = r, Value = (index + 1).ToString() });

        return View(model);
    }

Model:

public class ValidateVM
{
    public int[] Mdays { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> month { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<SelectListItem> year { get; set; }
}

View:

@using (Html.BeginForm("Mday", "Metrics", FormMethod.Get))
{
    @Html.DropDownListFor(model => model.month, Model.month)
    @Html.DropDownListFor(model => model.year, Model.year)

    <input type="submit" />
}
@if (ViewBag.Valid == 1)
{
    <img src="@Url.Action("ValidateChart", new { month = Request.QueryString["month"],
                                        year = Request.QueryString["year"]
  })" alt="Test"/>
}

Question: When the form is submitted, everything works just fine. I've seen methods where the model will include a variable for the selected item, such as int chosenMonth. Is there a benefit to doing things either way?

Is it okay to use the viewbag in the manner that I did? I use it to tell the view whether or not the input is valid, which determines whether or not to show the chart. I have heard many times to never use the viewbag. Why is this? What would be the best practice way to emulate my described behavior?

In my call to the ValidateChart (in view) function, I need to utilize the querystring to tell the action what month and year to generate the chart for. I've also seen this called bad practice, but have not found a better way to do this. What is the correct way to access querystring variables without going through the request scope?

I've managed to get this code into a working state, but I would really like to learn how to do it the right way.

share|improve this question
    
"I have heard many times to never use the viewbag." - The biggest problem, IMHO, is the ViewBag isn't an explicit model and lends itself to maintenance complications. (in the view: "What was that viewbag name again?"; "what data type was ViewBag.Foo supposed to be?"; etc.) At least with an explicit model there's no doubt in terms of transportation of data (also no casting later on in the view [List<Int32> integers = (List<Int32>)Viewbag.Bar;]). –  Brad Christie Jan 3 '13 at 17:48
1  
Brad is probably right but if you still want to set the validity in the ViewBag you can shorten the code to: ViewBag.Valid = month != 0 && year != 0 ? 1 : 0; –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 3 '13 at 17:51
    
Good points on the maintenance aspect. Would you suggest adding a bool valid to the view model as a solution? –  Jeff Jan 3 '13 at 17:59
    
@jeff: Personally, yes. The VM should have anything that's needed to be passed from the action to the view itself in terms of data. IMHO ViewBag is hacky (especially during a hand-off between someone writing the code and someone doing the UI). Unless the person working in the view goes back to the action and sees what Viewbag.* properties are assigned, they won't really know what's to expect. –  Brad Christie Jan 3 '13 at 18:03
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Firstly, if it works then it's certainly not the wrong way. It may not be the best way, but it's not wrong.

Here are some things I would change, you can decide if you want to use them or not...

1) I wouldn't use the ViewBag, simply add an additional property to your ViewModel like bool CanShowChart for example. Then you can simple test that in your View logic

2) Add a couple more properties for string SelectedMonth and string SelectedYear, these can be assigned in the controller based on the parameters. You don't need to worry about them being wrong on the first load because you will only use them when CanShowChart is true. You can then check these two values in your View instead of using the Request.QueryString method

3) I would prefer to pass a list of available months and years into my ViewModel and have the ViewModel create the SelectList on demand.

Just to be clear, my ViewModel would be like this:

public class ValidateViewModel
{
    public int[] Mdays { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<string> AvailableMonths { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<string> AvailableYears { get; set; }
    public string SelectedMonth { get; set; }
    public string SelectedYear { get; set; }
    public bool CanShowChart { get; set; }

    public List<SelectListItem> GetMonthsSelectList()
    {
        List<SelectListItem> list = new List<SelectListItem>();

        foreach(var month in AvailableMonths)
        {
            bool selected = month == SelectedMonth;
            list.Add(new SelectListItem() { Text = month, Value = month, Selected = selected });
        }

        return list;
    }

    public List<SelectListItem> GetYearsSelectList()
    {
        List<SelectListItem> list = new List<SelectListItem>();

        foreach(var year in AvailableYears)
        {
            bool selected = month == SelectedYear;
            list.Add(new SelectListItem() { Text = year, Value = year, Selected = selected });
        }

        return list;
    }

}

Then in your View you could use them like this...

@using (Html.BeginForm("Mday", "Metrics", FormMethod.Get))
{
    @Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedMonth, Model.GetMonthsSelectList())
    @Html.DropDownListFor(x => x.SelectedYear, Model.GetYearsSelectList())

    <input type="submit" />
}
@if (Model.CanShowChart)
{
    <img src="@Url.Action("ValidateChart", new { month = Model.SelectedMonth, year = Model.SelectedYear })" alt="Test"/>
}

Your controller could then be cut down to this...

public ActionResult Validate(int month = 0, int year = 0)
{
    //Check if input is valid
    ValidateViewModel model = new ValidateViewModel();
    model.CanShowChart = month != 0 && year != 0;
    model.SelectedMonth = month.ToString();
    model.SelectedYear = year.ToString();

    //Populate years
    model.AvailableYears = Enumerable.Range(2008, DateTime.Now.Year - 2007).Reverse().Select(r => r.ToString());

    //Populate months
    model.AvailableMonths = { "January", "February", "March", "April", "May", "June", "July", "August", "September", "October", "November", "December" };

    return View(model);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for code example. I had just thought about a solution similar to your response to my first question. If I added variables to represent the selected item, I wouldn't need to use request.querystring right? I would be able to do something like model.selectedMonth, I think... As for your third point, what is the benefit of having the ViewModel generate the SelectList dynamically? I'm not quite sure what you mean about my use of .reverse. I want a list of all years from 2008 to the current year. Without the reverse, the list starts at 2008 rather than 2013, which is why I reversed it. –  Jeff Jan 3 '13 at 18:08
4  
"if it works then it's certainly not the wrong way." - there is so much wrong with this –  Dmitry Jan 3 '13 at 18:13
    
@Jeff: Sorry, just my misunderstanding of how Enumerable.Range works, I will edit that bit out. And I prefer to put my list generation in the ViewModel because it keeps my controller code cleaner. Like I said, these are just my opinions for you to think about. You could instead have a static helper method that creates a list by taking a string array and selected value as parameters. This same generic function could be used each time you need a SelectList then –  musefan Jan 4 '13 at 8:44
    
@Dmitry: Wrong by definition means "not correct", if the OP sets out to achieve a task, and they successfully gets it working, then by definition it is not wrong. I am by no means saying that just because something works then it is the best way, or even the right way, simply that it is not wrong –  musefan Jan 4 '13 at 8:47
    
You can justify wrong however you want to you self. It stays wrong anyway. –  Dmitry Jan 4 '13 at 17:18
add comment

Querystring and URL alteration are quite useful in passing variables from request scope to server. I would not rate them as bad practice. Should one be using this, is a question to be answered by the system being designed.

IMO, variables like int ChosenMonth are useful in VM as they help to define the system correctly. Current definition of ValidateVM does not imply the functionality of being able to choose a month and a year, which I would think as covert logic opposed to a defined system. Also it would be more helpful in writing tests around selection functionality. One would be able to test selection functionality, the way it is being used.

Also, it would be worth while to see if there is any requirement to couple month and year into SelectedItem, like

class SelectedItem { int year, int month }
share|improve this answer
    
I have tried to add int ChosenMonth and changed part of my view to @Html.DropDownListFor(model => model.chosenMonth, Model.month). Using this method, the Selected attribute of the dropdown list no longer works. I suppose the functionality could be added to the controller, but would that really be beneficial over what you call covert logic? I suppose its a tradeoff between simplicity and understandability. Or maybe I'm just missing something? Is it possible to leave the @Html.DropDownListFor as is and simply set the value of chosenMonth afterwards? –  Jeff Jan 3 '13 at 17:55
add comment

I'll comment only on the Validation aspect of your code. The whole validation approach is really awkward. The model should be validated using ModelState. The correct paradigm would be writing something like this in your controller:

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult MyReport()
{
    ReportModel model = new ReportModel();
    // populate your model in order for all your inputs to show correctly (dropdowns data or whatever)
    return View("[pathToView]/ReportView.cshtml", model);
}

[HttpGet]
public ActionResult ShowMyReport(ReportModel model)
{
    if(ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // inputs validated, show the report
        [get report data according to the input]
        return View(model);
    }
    // inputs didn't validate. Rerender view and show errors.
    return View("[pathToView]/ReportView.cshtml", model); // should be the same view
}

Now, you validate your ReportModel by either Data Annotations or, a better way - using FluentValidation. So no, the way you used ViewBag - to indicate where the model is valid or not - not the best practice at all.

ModelState is an object that holds all the errors about a model. You can manually add errors to it like this ModelState.AddModelError("[propertyName]","Error Message") and then if Model was not validated all error messages will be shown in the view if you have either @Html.ValidationSummary() somewhere is the View or @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.PropertyName) in your View. Google around for more info about that. There is plenty of information covering this subject.

The best practice through is having your Actions in the controller as thin as possible, which is far from what you have. For this exact reason adding errors to ModelState in controller is discouraged. Again, use FluentValidation as it (1) separates concerns of validation and (2) is far more flexible then Data Annotations.

share|improve this answer
    
I would like this page to work with GET so that users would be able to send links to a specific month/year if required. But your solution does intrigue me. What exactly constitutes as a valid ModelState? –  Jeff Jan 3 '13 at 18:18
    
Updated my answer. Having this in GET is not a problem at all too. –  Dmitry Jan 3 '13 at 18:30
    
Although not directly an answer to my question, +1 for great constructive criticism –  Jeff Jan 3 '13 at 18:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.