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Can anyone help me with understanding recursion? I want to read a matrix recursively, and I don't really know how.

I made up a plan of transforming iterative agorithms to recursive ones in the following steps:

  1. Repetitive structure-> if followed by recall of function somewhere in the body
  2. Going from "top" to 0 and the going back to be alike the iterative way (i'm new to the concept, the idea may be dumb)

My function to read a matrix recursively (not working) is as follows:

void read_m(int n,int m)
{
    if(n)
    {
        if(m)
        {
            read_m(n,m-1);
        }
        f>>v[n][m]; 
        read_m(n-1,m);
    }
}

I know what the mistake is, what I do not know is how should I solve this. Thanks in advance.

P.S. n and m are width and height

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Why do you want to do this? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 3 '13 at 17:29
    
To teach myself recursion –  Bujanca Mihai Jan 3 '13 at 17:31
    
@BujancaMihai: although you can convert any iterative algorithm to use recursion instead (or vice versa), this isn't really a good candidate for doing so. If you want to study recursion, I'd start with something that's naturally recursive, such as traversing a tree. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 3 '13 at 17:34
    
At school they want us to learn to convert iterative algorithms to recursive ones, and I know how to do it for one repetitive structure, but yet I'm not very sure how should I do it when there is more than one –  Bujanca Mihai Jan 3 '13 at 17:38
    
To better understand how recursion works look at stack trace while going step-by-step. Recursion is all about stack states. –  Vasaka Jan 3 '13 at 22:39

3 Answers 3

Using recursion is probably not the greatest way to do this here but assuming you want it and you want the 'f' to execute for all the elements, it isn't going to work when n is 0 as it is inside the if(n) block.

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well, if, for example i have n=2,m=2, doesn't bother me if it doesn't fill the 0 line and 0 column. it's ok if i have my elements on [1,1];[1,2]; [2,1];[2,2] –  Bujanca Mihai Jan 3 '13 at 17:35
    
if N is 2, M is 2, the first element to be read will have N=2, M=0. What is v and what are its dimensions? You know array indexes are 0-based. –  CashCow Jan 3 '13 at 18:00
    
I changed it. It was the buffer from a file. –  Bujanca Mihai Jan 3 '13 at 18:09

first you should move f>>v[n][m];out if (n) block or it will not fill entire row with index 0.

second assuming that you keep data row by row you should read data before going to recursion, also to prevent double read you should only decrease rows when full column is read.

void read_m(int n,int m)
{
    f>>v[width-1-n][height-1-m]; //suppose that width and height defined elsewhere
    if(m)
    {
        read_m(n,m-1);
    }
    else if(n)
    {
        read_m(n-1,m);
    }
}

if it is column by column you should change m and n in your code.

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doesn't work, firstly because you will fill the matrix from the end. But then, you overwrite at some point in the program, i checked it step by step –  Bujanca Mihai Jan 3 '13 at 22:21
    
@BujancaMihai fixed –  Vasaka Jan 3 '13 at 22:36
    
n and m were actually width and height :D –  Bujanca Mihai Jan 4 '13 at 11:29
    
@BujancaMihai m and n are coordinates of the cell in that code, you need constant width and height to fill the matrix in order. you can initialize them from m and n, but should keep values for later. –  Vasaka Jan 4 '13 at 13:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include<fstream>
using namespace std;
ifstream f("recurs.in");
ofstream g("recurs.out");
int a[20][20],n,m;
void citire(int i, int j)
{
if(j>1)
    citire(i,j-1);
else if(i>1) 
    citire(i-1,m);
f>>a[i][j];
}
int main()
{
int i,j;
f>>n>>m;
citire(n,m);
for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
{
for(j=1;j<=m;j++)
g<<a[i][j]<<' ';
g<<endl;
}
}  

Working

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