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the first one is from a book which looks very cryptic/complex to me ,second one is the way i have seen people around me write including me :) ,also for the first style eclipse is showing that the catch "IOException openx" block is handing the exception for part where read and write is happening viz

while ((len = is.read(buf)) >= 0)
out.write(buf, 0, len);

.Does it mean catch "IOException iox" is useless code?

first style.

File file = new File("hsjdhsaj");
        InputStream is = null;
        try {
            URL url = new URL("");
            is = url.openStream();
            OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(file);
            try {
                byte[] buf = new byte[4096];
                int len;
                while ((len = is.read(buf)) >= 0)
                    out.write(buf, 0, len);
            } catch (IOException iox) {
            } finally {
                try {
                    out.close();
                } catch (IOException closeOutx) {
                }
            }
        } catch (FileNotFoundException fnfx) {
        } catch (IOException openx) {
        } finally {
            try {
                if (is != null)
                    is.close();
            } catch (IOException closeInx) {
            }
        }

second style.

    File file = new File("hsjdhsaj");
        InputStream is = null;
        OutputStream out = null;
        try {
            URL url = new URL("");
            is = url.openStream();
            out = new FileOutputStream(file);

            byte[] buf = new byte[4096];
            int len;
            while ((len = is.read(buf)) >= 0)
                out.write(buf, 0, len);

        } catch (FileNotFoundException fnfx) {
        } catch (IOException openx) {
        } finally {
            try {
                if (out != null)
                out.close();
                if (is != null)
                    is.close();
            } catch (IOException closeInx) {
            }
        }

if i put

try { 
if (is != null) is.close();
} catch (IOException closeInx) { }
try {
if (out != null) out.close(); 
} catch (IOException closeInx) { }

in finally block for second style then are they both same

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1  
Note: if you're using Java SE 7 have a look at the new Automatic Resource Management feature: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/… –  Puce Jan 3 '13 at 17:37
1  
You need to read up on Java exception handling, specifically what the meanings of finally, try, and catch are. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions –  Alex W Jan 3 '13 at 18:34

3 Answers 3

With the second style is is not closed when out.close() throws an exception. The first style does not have this problem.

In both code snippets often exceptions are silently swallowed. This can cause maintenance nightmares. Something does not work and you have no idea why.

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The first approach is more correct. Your second approach has a bug if an exception is thrown when calling out.close, because you'll never call is.close().

Of course, both of them are ugly. You should be using a utility method like IOUtils.closeQuietly() to close your streams. And you shouldn't be swallowing exceptions.

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Note that Guava also had a closeQuietly utility method, but they deprecated it, because "encourages misuse by making it easy to do the wrong thing", see docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git/javadoc/com/google/… –  lbalazscs Jan 3 '13 at 17:37
    
yeah shouldn't swallow exception, that's just pseudo code used in book to explain utility of java 7's try with resources update(project coin). the first one looks ugly ,lot of inner loops , the second one looks straight forward ,i am checking the link you shared thanks for that, what would be the fix ? does this looks good adding this to try { if (is != null) is.close(); } catch (IOException closeInx) { } try { if (out != null) out.close(); } catch (IOException closeInx) { } finally block –  saket Jan 3 '13 at 17:45
    
@lbalazscs so if we shouldn't use the utility class/method ,will the second style work with correction i posted? –  saket Jan 3 '13 at 18:11

Yes, the first one is more correct, but also very ugly. That's why Java 7 improved a lot exception handling. In you case you can use Try-with-Resources :

The new syntax allows you to declare resources that are part of the try block. What this means is that you define the resources ahead of time and the runtime automatically closes those resources (if they are not already closed) after the execution of the try block.

   try (BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(
    new InputStreamReader(
    new URL("http://www.yoursimpledate.server/").openStream())))
   {
    String line = reader.readLine();
    SimpleDateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/DD/YY");
    Date date = format.parse(line);
   } catch (ParseException | IOException exception) {
    // handle I/O problems.
   }

Take a look at Working with Java SE 7 Exception Changes

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i got the new Try-with-Resources stuff from the book i am reading ,but was really surprised at my bad knowledge, i never gave a thought about the bug lurking in the second style in my 3 years of coding :( –  saket Jan 3 '13 at 17:51

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