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Why is it that typing this in the console:

{}.toString
{}.hasOwnProperty
{}....

throws an SyntaxError, and typing:

[].slice
[].filter
({}).toString
({}.toString)

doesn't?

What is the difference between the Array and the Object?

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1  
What do you expect {}.... to do? –  Halcyon Jan 3 '13 at 17:30
    
@FritsvanCampen I ment {}.... eg. {}.isPrototypeOf –  NULL Jan 3 '13 at 17:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is the ambiguity of the { symbol. Try this:

({}.toString())

When the parser sees {} at the very beginning of a new statement, it has to choose between

  • Is this an object literal?
  • Is this a statement block?

It always chooses the second one, a statement block. Thus {} is an empty statement block, and .toString() right after that makes no sense.

There's no ambiguity with [] — an [ at the beginning of a statement can only be the start of an array literal (as part of an expression statement). However there are similar problems with the function keyword, which does double-duty as the start of a function declaration statement and the start of a function instantiation expression.

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({}).toString() will do also. –  jAndy Jan 3 '13 at 17:31
    
@jAndy yes it sure will! –  Pointy Jan 3 '13 at 17:32
    
In modern browsers {}.toString should do. IE8 might trhow syntax error tho... –  elclanrs Jan 3 '13 at 17:35
    
@elclanrs I don't think that can possibly be true. Firefox 17 throws a syntax error. It's a basic characteristic of the grammar. –  Pointy Jan 3 '13 at 17:35
    
Chrome v23 also throws a syntax error. Its not a browser issue, just a result of the spec. –  Ben McCormick Jan 3 '13 at 17:39

Because in the console {} is treated as a block statement, and not an object. To make it think it's an object use ({}):

({}).toString
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Not only in the console, in other environments as well. –  Felix Kling Jan 3 '13 at 17:38
    
@FelixKling: True, this is the case in most places. –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 3 '13 at 17:40

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