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I want to create an android application (client) that can access specific files on a laptop (server) over long distance (without using wi-fi or bluetooth) . what's the best way to do this? UDP or TCP?

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To do this over the mobile network will be quite difficult - typically your phone cannot see your PC as your ISP hides it, and the PC can definitely not see the phone behind the mobile ISP's complex NAT and firewall. To connect them you will probably need the aid of a mutually reachable server. With some care that may be able to drop out after introducing them to each other and let them talk directly, otherwise it will have to remain involved as a proxy. You might find it easier to use an existing cloud storage or PC remote access solution. –  Chris Stratton Jan 3 '13 at 19:40
    
I guess i wasn't very clear. I have an android client running on a pc and a server program running on another pc. –  user1944690 Jan 4 '13 at 6:02
    
Thats odd as more than a development step. What sort of network connects them? –  Chris Stratton Jan 4 '13 at 13:07

1 Answer 1

I would recommend to read Wiki articles: TCP and UDP.

Very-very high level description.

TCP is for guaranteed delivery (when you need to be sure that you will receive 100% of the data). It makes sense to use it for file transfer.

UDP doesn't guarantee delivery. So, by itself it's not very good for file transfer. You may need to build/reuse some higher level protocol based on UDP to achieve file transfer.

And one more note. It make sense to use existing higher level protocol (FTP as example) which sits on top of TCP/IP for file transfer.

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thanks. and i have another question. i have problems when i try to run the code on android emulator. how should i change the port? –  user1944690 Jan 3 '13 at 18:03
    
I am not sure. I would recommend to ask separate question. –  Victor Ronin Jan 3 '13 at 18:16

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