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What is the exact difference between Dijkstra's and Prim's algorithm. I know Prim's will give a MST but the tree generated by Dijkstra will also be a MST. Then what is the exact difference?

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1  
It's Dijkstra. "ij" is a diphthong (gliding vowel) in Dutch, and it's the one place where "j" isn't a consonant. –  Rhymoid Jan 3 '13 at 17:49
    
any ways you got the question. –  anuj pradhan Jan 3 '13 at 17:51

7 Answers 7

Prim's algorithm constructs a minimum spanning tree for the graph, which is a tree that connects all nodes in the graph and has the least total cost among all trees that connect all the nodes. However, the length of a path between any two nodes in the MST might not be the shortest path between those two nodes in the original graph. MSTs are useful, for example, if you wanted to physically wire up the nodes in the graph to provide electricity to them at the least total cost. It doesn't matter that the path length between two nodes might not be optimal, since all you care about is the fact that they're connected.

Dijkstra's algorithm constructs a shortest path tree starting from some source node. A shortest path tree is a tree that connects all nodes in the graph and has the property that the length of any path from some start node to any other node in the graph is minimized. This is useful, for example, if you wanted to build a road network that made it as efficient as possible for everyone to get to some major important landmark. However, the shortest path tree is not guaranteed to be a minimum spanning tree, and the cost of building such a tree could be much larger than the cost of an MST.

Another important difference concerns what types of graphs the algorithms work on. Prim's algorithm works on undirected graphs only, since the concept of an MST assumes that graphs are inherently undirected. (There is something called a "minimum spanning arborescence" for directed graphs, but algorithms to find them are much more complicated). Dijkstra's algorithm will work fine on directed graphs, since shortest path trees can indeed be directed. Additionally, Dijkstra's algorithm does not necessarily yield the correct solution in graphs containing negative edge weights, while Prim's algorithm can handle this.

Hope this helps!

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Thanks so much this is glorious! –  kareem Dec 12 '14 at 3:52

Dijkstra's algorithm doesn't create a MST, it finds the shortest path.

Consider this graph

       5     5
  s *-----*-----* t
     \         /
       -------
         9

The shortest path is 9, while the MST is a different 'path' at 10.

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Ok thanks ...you cleared a good point to notice. Till now i was considering that the output generated by dijkstra will be a MST but you cleared the doubt with a good example .I can see clearly if i will find a MST using say 'kruskal' then i will get the same path as you mentioned. Thanks a lot –  anuj pradhan Jan 3 '13 at 17:57
2  
More correctly - The shortest path is 9 ... from s to t. The weight of the graph generated by Dijkstra's algorithm, starting at s, is 14 (5+9). –  Dukeling Jan 3 '13 at 18:01
    
@Dukeling - Huh? the weight of the tree/graph in Dijkstra's is meaningless, that's sort of the point.... –  dfb Jan 3 '13 at 18:12
    
@dfb You were proving it's not an MST, so the weight is important for that. As in 14 > 10, so it's not an MST. –  Dukeling Jan 3 '13 at 18:22
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Very succinctly illustrated! –  Ram Narasimhan Jun 2 '14 at 23:55

Directly from Dijkstra's Algorithm's wikipedia article:

The process that underlies Dijkstra's algorithm is similar to the greedy process used in Prim's algorithm. Prim's purpose is to find a minimum spanning tree that connects all nodes in the graph; Dijkstra is concerned with only two nodes. Prim's does not evaluate the total weight of the path from the starting node, only the individual path.

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"Dijkstra is concerned with only two nodes" is bunk. –  tmyklebu Aug 31 '14 at 6:55

Dijkstra finds the shortest path between it's beginning node and every other node. So in return you get the minimum distance tree from beginning node i.e. you can reach every other node as efficiently as possible.

Prims algorithm gets you the MST for a given graph i.e. a tree that connects all nodes while the sum of all costs is the minimum possible.

To make a story short with a realistic example:

  1. Dijkstra wants to know the shortest path to each destination point by saving traveling time and fuel.
  2. Prim wants to know how to efficiently deploy a train rail system i.e. saving material costs.
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Prim and Dijkstra algorithm are almost the same, except the "relax part".

In Prim:

MST-PRIM (G, w, r) {

        for each key ∈ G.V

            u.key = ∞
            u.parent = NIL

        r.key = 0
        Q = G.V
        while (Q ≠ ø)

            u = Extract-Min(Q)
            for each v ∈ G.Adj[u]

                if (v ∈ Q) and w(u,v) < v.key

                    v.parent = u
                    v.key = w(u,v)    <== relax function, Pay attention here

}

In Dijkstra:

Dijkstra (G, w, r) {

        for each key ∈ G.V

            u.key = ∞
            u.parent = NIL

        r.key = 0
        Q = G.V
        while (Q ≠ ø)

            u = Extract-Min(Q)
            for each v ∈ G.Adj[u]

                if (v ∈ Q) and w(u,v) < v.key

                    v.parent = u
                    v.key = w(u,v) + u.key  <== relax function, Pay attention here

}

The only difference is the last line of the code. In Prim, which searching the minimum spanning tree, only cares about the minimum of the total edges cover all the vertices. so it looks like: v.key = w(u,v) In Dijkstra, which searching the minimum path length, so it cares about the edge accumulation. So it looks like :v.key = w(u,v) + u.key

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The key difference between the basic algorithms lies in their different edge-selection criteria. Generally, they both use a priority queue for selecting next nodes, but have different criteria to select the adjacent nodes of current processing nodes: Prim's Algorithm requires the next adjacent nodes must be also kept in the queue, while Dijkstra's Algorithm does not:

def dijkstra(g, s):
    q <- make_priority_queue(VERTEX.distance)
    for each vertex v in g.vertex:
        v.distance <- infinite
        v.predecessor ~> nil
        q.add(v)
    s.distance <- 0
    while not q.is_empty:
        u <- q.extract_min()
        for each adjacent vertex v of u:
            ...

def prim(g, s):
    q <- make_priority_queue(VERTEX.distance)
    for each vertex v in g.vertex:
        v.distance <- infinite
        v.predecessor ~> nil
        q.add(v)
    s.distance <- 0
    while not q.is_empty:
        u <- q.extract_min()
        for each adjacent vertex v of u:
            if v in q and weight(u, v) < v.distance:// <-------selection--------
            ...

The calculations of vertex.distance are the second different point.

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@templatetypedef has covered difference between MST and shortest path. I've covered the algorithm difference in another So answer by demonstrating that both can be implemented using same generic algorithm that takes one more parameter as input: function f(u,v). The difference between Prim and Dijkstra's algorithm is simply which f(u,v) you use.

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