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When I try to hit this action via Javascript, I get a 406 Not Acceptable error:

  def show
    @annotation = Annotation.find_by_id(params[:id])

    respond_to do |format|
      format.html {
         if @annotation.blank?
           redirect_to root_path
         else
           redirect_to inline_annotation_path(@annotation)
         end
       }

       format.js {
         if params[:format] == "raw"
           render :text => @annotation.body.to_s
         else
           render :text => @annotation.body.to_html
         end
       }
    end
  end

This is from jQuery, but I'm doing the right beforeSend stuff:

  $.ajaxSetup({ 
    beforeSend: function(xhr) {
      xhr.setRequestHeader("Accept", "text/javascript");
    },
    cache: false 
  });

Here are my request headers:

Host    localhost:3000
User-Agent  Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.5; en-US; rv:1.9.1.3) Gecko/20090824 Firefox/3.5.3
Accept  text/javascript
Accept-Language en-us,en;q=0.5
Accept-Encoding gzip,deflate
Accept-Charset  ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.7
Keep-Alive  300
Connection  keep-alive
X-Requested-With    XMLHttpRequest
Content-Type    application/x-www-form-urlencoded
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1  
Please mark your answer as the correct one... never thought I add a comment concerning that, but it makes finding the answer so much easier. –  erroric Jun 10 '13 at 17:08
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12 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

I cracked the case!

I was sending a format parameter with my get request in order to tell the server to send me markdown instead of HTML. Here's my Javascript:

$.get("/annotations/" + annotation_id, {format: 'raw'}, function(data) {
});

and then I was looking for this parameter in the format.js block:

   format.js {
     if params[:format] == "raw"
       render :text => @annotation.body.to_s
     else
       render :text => @annotation.body.to_html
     end
   }

but apparently a format parameter confuses the respond_to block. I changed it from {format: 'raw'} to {markdown: 'true'} and it works.

I guess this is a bug in Rails?

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10  
This is not a bug but intended behaviour: Rails uses the Accept Headers and the format parameter to determine wether to respond with html, javascript, xml, json or something else. So in your case the format.js {} block was never called because Rails thought that you wanted something with the format "raw" and not something with the format "js". –  severin May 25 '10 at 12:46
2  
You're right — I should have registered a Markdown mimetype (stackoverflow.com/questions/2456219/…) and added a format.markdown block –  Horace Loeb May 26 '10 at 4:22
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I've also gotten this when trying to do a redirect from within a respond_to block.

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include "format.js" in your respond_to block

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This happened to me when using HTTPRiot connecting to a JSON rendering web app from an iPhone app. It appears that the issue is due to Rails expecting an Accept HTTP header that it is well, comfortable with. As such, I used Firefox's LiveHTTPHeaders extension to see what headers work without a 406. In any case the Accept string that worked was:

text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8

Another area that I would examine is the JSON-producing controller. If the controller is missing a format directive to specify it can return JSON in response, that too may cause a 406 error.

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Check your application.js for require jquery_ujs

//= require jquery_ujs
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Just use this code in controller action method format block:

format.js   { render :nothing => true }  
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If you are using jRails this was causing a lot of problems for me, here is my application.js file:

$(document).ready(function () {
    $.ajaxSetup({
    	beforeSend: function (xhr) {
    		xhr.setRequestHeader("Accept", "text/javascript, text/html, application/xml, text/xml, */*");
    	}
    });
});
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Didn't work <:( –  Horace Loeb Sep 12 '09 at 6:28
    
gist.github.com/185743 - Try this for your jRails.js file. –  Garrett Sep 12 '09 at 6:56
    
I'm actually not even using jRails (just regular jQuery) –  Horace Loeb Sep 12 '09 at 18:42
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Can you try without setting the Accept Header? It should actually work even without the Accept header.

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Still doesn't work (so frustrating!) –  Horace Loeb Sep 12 '09 at 18:43
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Is this served through Apache? You may want to take a look at http://forums.alwayswebhosting.com/showthread.php?p=8381, which describes scenarios where security policy interferes with requests.

EDIT: The URL referenced above advocates turning off request-sniffing security policy across an entire site, which makes the site vulnerable. Setting the SecFilterEngine option to Off in the .htaccess, which is what is prescribed in the URL, should be done only to zero in on the source of the problem. It should not be considered a long term solution.

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Didn't work <:( –  Horace Loeb Sep 12 '09 at 6:30
    
What does the data you intend to send back to the client as part of your response look like? It is JSON, HTML, JavaScript? –  David Andres Sep 12 '09 at 8:29
    
@Horace: please see my update to this post. –  David Andres Sep 12 '09 at 8:32
    
I'm just sending back text (markdown to be precise), although this doesn't work from Javascript even if I comment out the contents of the format.js block (so I don't think what I'm sending is relevant). Also, this is happening on my local machine through Mongrel –  Horace Loeb Sep 12 '09 at 18:42
    
If you aren't sending back javascript, then you don't need the "text/javascript" request header. Perhaps "text/plain" will be a better fit for your needs. –  David Andres Sep 12 '09 at 18:49
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For me it was a simple before_filter that was restricting a action that renders a js file, once I added the :except => [:action] to the before_filter block it was fine.

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I hit this problem when I forgot to add :remote => true to my Ajax form.

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i was calling the url for js format but had this in the controller:

respond_to do |format|
  format.html 
end

this worked fine in Safari, but not with Firefox.

naturally i was missing something, should be:

respond_to do |format|
  format.html
  format.js
end

and now both browsers are fine.

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