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I'm developing a desktop app that will scan a user's system for mp3 files and send their whole collection to a website. I'm assuming the best file format for sending this data to a server would be XML -- although correct me if I'm wrong.

Can someone kindly comment on whether the formatting of the sample XML file below looks okay? Thanks!

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<collection>
    <artist name="Michael Jackson">
        <track>Beat It</track>
        <track>Thriller</track>
    </artist>
    <artist name="The Beatles">
        <track>Hey Jude</track>
        <track>Yellow Submarine</track>
    </artist>
    <artist name="Eminem">
        <track>Lose Yourself</track>
        <track>Without Me</track>
    </artist>
</collection>
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1  
If it stores everything you need, it can only be okay. –  zneak Jan 3 '13 at 18:09
    
Ask at: codereview.stackexchange.com –  Dave Jarvis Jan 3 '13 at 19:06

1 Answer 1

Is XML a suitable format?

Yes, but if the server understands Json, it would be an even better choice. XML just means more decisions (should I make it a node or a tag or an attribute... surprise! there's no correct answer), and needless encoding (do you really want to use anything other than UTF8 for data storage) and version tags (Json is simple enough that we've put up with the same version for years).

Does the file look okay?

Well, it looks well-structured, in that there's one parent tag enclosing all your data and you remembered the version/encoding declaration.

In terms of design, I would suggest something a bit more specific though, you should give echo file either a unique id, or include the local path to the file. The reason you should do so is that most libraries contain at least two songs with the same name and artist. Sometimes that can be a duplicate, but other times it can be meaningful - like a live version and a studio version.

If you need to study an XML music library, you could always view an XML file from an existing music app, like an iTunes Library file (doesn't get more thorough than that) or something more sane, like Songbird.

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