Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I have a web method that deletes a file when called and it accepts three parameters (cNum, year, and fileName). Do I need to be worried about exploits of this method. The only thing I could think of would be using ..\..\..\ to drive the delete further up the folder structure. that should be pretty easy to remove that. But is there anything else that I should be worried about?

[WebMethod(EnableSession = true, 
           Description = "Method for deleting files uploaded by customers")]
[ScriptMethod(ResponseFormat = ResponseFormat.Xml)]
public Boolean deleteCustFiles(string cNum, string year, string fileName)
{
    try
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(cNum) 
            || String.IsNullOrEmpty(year) 
            || String.IsNullOrEmpty(fileName))
                throw new Exception();

        string path = Server.MapPath(@"~\docs\custFiles\" 
                                        + year + @"\" 
                                        + cNum + @"\" + fileName);
        File.Delete(path);
    }
    catch
    {
        throw new Exception("Unable to delete file");
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this question
    
not sure if wildcards can be used but that may be another problem... –  dutzu Jan 3 '13 at 18:33
    
Before you do File.Delete I would certainly check to make sure the file exists, that would allow you to provide a better message letting the user know the file does not exist instead of a general 'Unable to delete file' message. –  ammills01 Jan 3 '13 at 18:34
    
you shouldnt throw Exception, or if you do, dont throw Exception, FileNotFoundException is better. or return false which is better. –  DarthVader Jan 4 '13 at 18:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I would recommend using the GetFileName method on the Path class to cleanse the filename parameter, like so:

public Boolean deleteCustFiles(string cNum, string year, string fileName)
{
    // Cleanse fileName.
    fileName = Path.GetFileName(fileName);

The GetFileName method strips all directory information from a path, which is exactly what you want to do here.

With input like:

..\..\..\filename.ext

You would get:

filename.ext

In return, you don't have to worry about someone injecting a path which would escape the directory that you are targeting (assuming that this filename is user-input or from an open endpoint where someone could enter any input they want).

This then allows you to then append your custom path to fileName.

This only works of course if all of your files are in a pre-defined directory, which it seems it is.

This does not however, do anything to handle deleting files that a user doesn't have access to. If the files belong to another user in that directory, then there's no check here to see if that's the case (but if all users have rights to delete these files, then it's ok).

Also, you might want to use the Combine method on the Path class to combine your paths, like so:

string path = Server.MapPath(@"~\docs\custFiles\")
path = Path.Combine(path, year);
path = Path.Combine(path, cNum);
path = Path.Combine(path, fileName);

If you're using .NET 4.0 or above, you can use the overload of the Combine method that takes the parts of the path as a parameter array:

string path = Path.Combine(
    Server.MapPath(@"~\docs\custFiles\"),
    year, cNum, fileName);

Finally, as Shai points out, if possible (for a complete solution), to make this even more secure you should be enabling permissions on the file-system level.

If you are impersonating the user or using a constrained user account to handle all of the requests, then you should grant that user access to just the ~\docs\custFiles\ directory (and any sub directories).

Anything above that directory the user account should have no access to.

share|improve this answer

It is a good idea to check the file names and directory names if they are valid file names or not, check them against this char array:

Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars

EDIT:

And you should probably also validate the year and number like this:

bool valid = int.TryParse(num, out temp);

share|improve this answer
    
Why try and validate the year and number? This is only useful if the sub directories are not the only sub directories in the directory structure and those other sub directories are not user-accessible. I wouldn't expect this to be the case since I'd expect custFiles to be completely driven by users and not by code. Any information about files/directories in there should be stored somewhere else completely. –  casperOne Jan 4 '13 at 12:57
    
@casperOne , From what the question has, it appears that he needs to validate the year and number using String.IsNullOrEmpty() , which suggested that maybe it depends on user input, and that he is not sure of the variables value, so extra validation could be useful in making sure that those variables have exactly what is expected for them to have. –  sharp12345 Jan 4 '13 at 13:26
    
"Could be useful" - You're not showing where it could be useful. Let's say that there are two directories, 1998 and 1999. If the user input is "abcd" then the directory doesn't exist and nothing is deleted. If someone legitimately sends "1988", then there's no problem, the file is deleted. However, if someone sends "1999" maliciously (let's say the file is in both) to delete something that one thought should be in 1998, parsing the integer has no effect here; it didn't keep the user from accessing a directory they shouldn't have. It doesn't add any extra security. –  casperOne Jan 4 '13 at 13:30
    
@casperOne , Isn't it possible to have .. in one of those variables ? –  sharp12345 Jan 4 '13 at 13:38
    
Yes, in which case, parsing for an integer might help, but you might want to use Path.GetFileName instead and just strip it completely. –  casperOne Jan 4 '13 at 13:48

You may also want to consider using built in security on the file system to prevent users from deleting files in unwanted directories. If the web app is running under a specific user that has rights to delete files in only one directory, no matter what the user tries, the app will not have the rights to perform the delete.

In addition, this would make maintenance (ie: adding new directories) pretty easy without redeploying the app.

You could then catch the attempt to access the invalid access attempt and do something with it if you so desire.

[WebMethod(EnableSession = true, 
    Description = "Method for deleting files uploaded by customers")]
[ScriptMethod(ResponseFormat = ResponseFormat.Xml)]
public Boolean deleteCustFiles(string cNum, string year, string fileName)
{
    try
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(cNum) || String.IsNullOrEmpty(year) ||
            String.IsNullOrEmpty(fileName))
            throw new Exception();
        string path = 
            Server.MapPath(@"~\docs\custFiles\" + year + @"\" + cNum + 
                @"\" + fileName);
        File.Delete(path);
    }
    catch (System.Security.SecurityException e)
    {
        throw new Exception("Unauthorized attempt to delete file");
    }
    catch
    {
        throw new Exception("Unable to delete file");
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
While built in security for the file system is a good addition, you're possibly propagating the attack from the input. Attention should still be paid to the input that's coming in from the user if there's a certain expectation about it. In this case, there absolutely is one, that directory information won't be there. –  casperOne Jan 4 '13 at 16:40
    
@casperOne: I don't understand what you mean by possibly propagating the attack. Could you please elaborate? –  Shai Cohen Jan 4 '13 at 17:11
1  
Take for example if ..\..\filename.ext was passed in. Granted, you shouldn't give permissions to anything two directories up to the user that is actually performing the delete, but that's not a complete solution. You should always sanitize the inputs. –  casperOne Jan 4 '13 at 17:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.