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I'm trying to make a list of text in a text file like it was being typed.. Kinda like this:

T
Te
Tex
Text

I dunno how to explain it well, so here's an example:

Text file contents:

Line 1
Line 2
Line 3

The list of the first line will be like: ['L', 'Li', 'Lin', 'Line', 'Line ', 'Line 1', 'Line 1\n'].

And the complete list will be: [['L', 'Li', 'Lin', 'Line', 'Line ', 'Line 1', 'Line 1\n'], ['L', 'Li', 'Lin', 'Line', 'Line ', 'Line 2', 'Line 2\n'], ['L', 'Li', 'Lin', 'Line', 'Line ', 'Line 3']]

This is my current code:

lines=open('foo.txt', 'r').readlines()
letters=[]
cnt=0
for line in lines:
    letters.append([])
    for letter in line:
        if len(letters[cnt]) > 0:
            letters[cnt].append(letters[cnt][len(letters[cnt])-1]+letter)
        else:
            letters[cnt].append(letter)
    cnt+=1

print letters

The output is exactly like the complete list above.

The problem is this code is kinda slow on bigger files.. Is there any faster way to achieve the same output?

share|improve this question
    
Execution time: 4.00600004196 seconds (without printing) on a 4.15 MB text file –  Ultimate Zero Jan 3 '13 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using a list comprehension:

In [66]: with open("data.txt") as f:
    print [[line[0:i+1] for i in range(len(line))] for line in f]
   ....:     
[['L', 'Li', 'Lin', 'Line', 'Line ', 'Line 1', 'Line 1\n'], 
 ['L', 'Li', 'Lin', 'Line', 'Line ', 'Line 2', 'Line 2\n'],
 ['L', 'Li', 'Lin', 'Line', 'Line ', 'Line 3', 'Line 3\n']]
share|improve this answer
    
Execution time: 1.50900006294 seconds (without printing) on a 4.15 MB text file –  Ultimate Zero Jan 3 '13 at 19:48
    
+1 for the epic two liner –  Ultimate Zero Jan 3 '13 at 19:53
1  
@UltimateZero paste the print line after f: and it is a one-liner. Also it is better than something like : result.append([line[:i+1] for i in xrange(len(line))]), which is slower compared to list comprehensions. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 3 '13 at 19:58
    
What is In [66]:? I'm still a novice Pythoner, and this doesn't compute, nor run. I get SyntaxError: invalid syntax. If I remove that it works. Just wonderin'... Still gets my vote. –  Gordon Freeman Jan 3 '13 at 20:26
    
@IanAtkin I am using IPython interpreter, it uses In[#] and Out[#] instead of >>> used in normal python interpreter. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 3 '13 at 20:28
result = []
for line in open('foo.txt'):
    result.append([line[:i+1] for i in xrange(len(line))])
print result
share|improve this answer
    
Execution time: 1.51699995995 seconds (without printing) on a 4.15 MB text file –  Ultimate Zero Jan 3 '13 at 19:46

The reason why this gets slow is because you collect huge lists with only redundant information. Do you really need these lists or would something like that do the trick, too?

for line in lines:
    for i in range (0,len(line)-1):
        for j,letter in enumerate(line):
            print letter,
            if j>=i:
                print ''
                break

This outputs

T 
T h 
T h i 
T h i s 
T h i s   
T h i s   i 
T h i s   i s 
T h i s   i s   
T h i s   i s   t 
T h i s   i s   t h 
T h i s   i s   t h e 
T h i s   i s   t h e   
T h i s   i s   t h e   f 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r s 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r s t 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r s t   
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r s t   l 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r s t   l i 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r s t   l i n 
T h i s   i s   t h e   f i r s t   l i n e 

and I assume this is what you want (except for the whitespaces between the letters but I assume we can get rid of them somehow, too).

share|improve this answer

This seems like a particularly good case for Python's memoryviews: when using them you do not creates substrings of the original string, merely views of the original string. The performance gain on a large file with lines longer than few characters should be substantial.

results = []
with open("data.txt") as f:
    for line in f:
        letters = tuple(buffer(line, 0, i+1) for i in xrange(len(line)))
        results.append(letters)

If list of all prefixes do not need to be all expanded at the same time, using generators can be considered.

Note: If timing without printing, the following should be hard to beat ;-)

with open("data.txt") as f:
    results = (buffer(line, 0, i+1) for line in f for i in xrange(len(line)))
share|improve this answer
    
Syntax error in 4th line.. And do you mean results = [] in the first line? –  Ultimate Zero Jan 3 '13 at 19:51
    
Yes, I do. Edited. –  lgautier Jan 3 '13 at 20:01
    
The error was because of missing () around the generator. I simplified the example by taking the generator out. –  lgautier Jan 3 '13 at 20:10

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