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I want a class that I can create instances of with one variable unset (the id), then initialise this variable later, and have it immutable after initialisation. Effectively, I'd like a final variable that I can initialise outside of the constructor.

Currently, I'm improvising this with a setter that throws an Exception as follows:

public class Example {

    private long id = 0;

    // Constructors and other variables and methods deleted for clarity

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(long id) throws Exception {
        if ( this.id == 0 ) {
            this.id = id;
        } else {
            throw new Exception("Can't change id once set");
        }
    }
}

Is this a good way of going about what I'm trying to do? I feel like I should be able to set something as immutable after it's initialised, or that there is a pattern I can use to make this more elegant.

share|improve this question
7  
Is there a GOOD reason for not setting it in the constructor? –  Peter Liljenberg Jan 3 '13 at 19:57
3  
What is wrong with doing it this way? I would have done it the same way: a setter that throws an exception if your try to set it a second time. –  Anony-Mousse Jan 3 '13 at 20:19
1  
@Anony-Mousse I agree - even though I still think it's a bad "pattern". –  Peter Liljenberg Jan 3 '13 at 21:03
1  
@PeterLiljenberg - I can't set it in the constructor as I don't know the id at that time. The ID is returned from a remote server at a later time. After writing this question, I decided to re-design my interactions so the server creates the object itself, but I'm still interested in the best approach here. –  Richard Russell Jan 4 '13 at 9:37
1  
@KatjaChristiansen - cambecc says below "Assertions are disabled by default--they are enabled only with the -ea flag on the JVM command line. So the behavior of your class changes depending on this flag. Without assertions enabled (again, this is the default), you can set the id as many times as you want." Perhaps assertions aren't so good... –  Richard Russell Jan 9 '13 at 14:28

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let me suggest you a little bit more elegant decision. First variant (without throwing an exception):

public class Example {

    private Long id;

    // Constructors and other variables and methods deleted for clarity

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(long id) {
        this.id = this.id == null ? id : this.id;
    }

}

Second variant (with throwing an exception):

     public void setId(long id)  {
         this.id = this.id == null ? id : throw_();
     }

     public int throw_() {
         throw new RuntimeException("id is already set");
     }
share|improve this answer
    
So the first variant causes the setId to be a noOp when it's called on an already set ID. Nice idea. I also note you've changed the long to a Long so you can test for null. Is that inherently better than having it a long and testing for == 0? –  Richard Russell Jan 4 '13 at 9:42
1  
@RichardRussell, I think yes, that is better in a manner, because null value is something other, than a numeric type, which is held by your variable. It allows you assign 0 (zero) value, and throw an exception in case when this value is assigned again (in case when first value of id will be == 0, your test will allow new assignment, but it must do not allow this). –  Andremoniy Jan 4 '13 at 10:15

The "set only once" requirement feels a bit arbitrary. I'm fairly certain what you're looking for is a class that transitions permanently from uninitialized to initialized state. After all, it may be convenient to set an object's id more than once (via code reuse or whatever), as long as the id is not allowed to change after the object is "built".

One fairly reasonable pattern is to keep track of this "built" state in a separate field:

public final class Example {

    private long id;
    private boolean isBuilt;

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(long id) {
        if (isBuilt) throw new IllegalArgumentException("already built");
        this.id = id;
    }

    public void build() {
        isBuilt = true;
    }
}

Usage:

Example e = new Example();

// do lots of stuff

e.setId(12345L);
e.build();

// at this point, e is immutable

With this pattern, you construct the object, set its values (as many times as is convenient), and then call build() to "immutify" it.

There are several advantages to this pattern over your initial approach:

  1. There are no magic values used to represent uninitialized fields. For example, 0 is just as valid an id as any other long value.
  2. Setters have a consistent behavior. Before build() is called, they work. After build() is called, they throw, regardless of what values you pass. (Note the use of unchecked exceptions for convenience).
  3. The class is marked final, otherwise a developer could extend your class and override the setters.

But this approach has a fairly big drawback: developers using this class can't know, at compile time, if a particular object has been initialized or not. Sure, you could add an isBuilt() method so developers can check, at runtime, if the object is initialized, but it would be so much more convenient to know this information at compile time. For that, you could use the builder pattern:

public final class Example {

    private final long id;

    public Example(long id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public static class Builder {

        private long id;

        public long getId() {
            return id;
        }

        public void setId(long id) {
            this.id = id;
        }

        public Example build() {
            return new Example(id);
        }
    }
}

Usage:

Example.Builder builder = new Example.Builder();
builder.setId(12345L);
Example e = builder.build();

This is much better for several reasons:

  1. We're using final fields, so both the compiler and developers know these values cannot be changed.
  2. The distinction between initialized and uninitialized forms of the object is described via Java's type system. There is simply no setter to call on the object once it has been built.
  3. Instances of the built class are guaranteed thread safe.

Yes, it's a bit more complicated to maintain, but IMHO the benefits outweigh the cost.

share|improve this answer
    
I still can't create an Example object without the Id set, and then set the Id later. Also, I don't see how the builder pattern helps here. I can't see any difference between using it vs just saying: Example e = new Example(12345) –  Richard Russell Jan 4 '13 at 9:46
1  
Hmmm. The "isBuilt" pattern above does allow you to create an Example object without the id set and then set the id later. After the id is set, simply call build() to stop any further modifications to the object. –  cambecc Jan 4 '13 at 15:49
4  
As for the "builder" pattern, you are right that for this trivial example there is not much difference between it and simply saying Example e = new Example(12345L). The distinction comes from what the types are telling you. If you have an instance of Example.Builder, you know all fields are settable at any time (including the id, when you eventually set it). But once you have an instance of Example, you know that the object has been fully initialized and won't (can't) change in the future. That is a very powerful guarantee. –  cambecc Jan 4 '13 at 15:54

You can simply add a boolean flag, and in your setId(), set/check the boolean. If I understood the question right, we don't need any complex structure/pattern here. How about this:

public class Example {

private long id = 0;
private boolean touched = false;

// Constructors and other variables and methods deleted for clarity

public long getId() {
    return id;
}

public void setId(long id) throws Exception {
    if ( !touchted ) {
        this.id = id;
         touched = true;
    } else {
        throw new Exception("Can't change id once set");
    }
}

}

in this way, if you setId(0l); it thinks that the ID is set too. You can change if it is not right for your business logic requirement.

not edited it in an IDE, sorry for the typo/format problem, if there was...

share|improve this answer
    
This looks similar to what I had but rather than checking for 0 and implicitly assuming that means the id isn't set, having a boolean flag. Makes sense, but in my case, I know id=0 is invalid (so is equivalent to not set). –  Richard Russell Jan 4 '13 at 9:52
2  
@RichardRussell you can do the check in if block. if id==0, return directly, without changing the boolean. or even, if the id passed in equals current id, return directly. this will make setId(2); setId(2); twice not throw exception. you know your requirement best. :) –  Kent Jan 4 '13 at 10:05

Here's the solution I came up with based on mixing some of the answers and comments above, particularly one from @KatjaChristiansen on using assert.

public class Example {

    private long id = 0L;
    private boolean idSet = false;

    public long getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(long id) {
        // setId should not be changed after being set for the first time.
        assert ( !idSet ) : "Can't change id from " + this.id + " to " + id;
        this.id = id;
        idSet = true;
    }

    public boolean isIdSet() {
        return idSet;
    }

}

At the end of the day, I suspect that my need for this is an indication of poor design decisions elsewhere, and I should rather find a way of creating the object only when I know the Id, and setting the id to final. This way, more errors can be detected at compile time.

share|improve this answer
3  
You probably don't want to do this. Assertions are disabled by default--they are enabled only with the -ea flag on the JVM command line. So the behavior of your class changes depending on this flag. Without assertions enabled (again, this is the default), you can set the id as many times as you want. –  cambecc Jan 4 '13 at 16:01
2  
@RichardRussell I'm sorry, I could have made my question about the scenario you are facing a bit clearer in my comment on the question. An assert would document in the code that you really didn't intent to set the value twice and thus want the application to stop during development (it would be switched off before deployment), but if you have a condition that might occur during runtime and from which you want ro recover you shouldn't use it. –  Katja Christiansen Jan 9 '13 at 20:35

I have this class, similar to JDK's AtomicReference, and I use it mostly for legacy code:

import static com.google.common.base.Preconditions.checkNotNull;
import static com.google.common.base.Preconditions.checkState;

import javax.annotation.Nonnull;
import javax.annotation.concurrent.NotThreadSafe;

@NotThreadSafe
public class PermanentReference<T> {

    private T reference;

    public PermanentReference() {
    }

    public void set(final @Nonnull T reference) {
        checkState(this.reference == null, 
            "reference cannot be set more than once");
        this.reference = checkNotNull(reference);
    }

    public @Nonnull T get() {
        checkState(reference != null, "reference must be set before get");
        return reference;
    }
}

I has single responsibilty and check both get and set calls, so it fails early when client code misuse it.

share|improve this answer

Marking a field private and not exposing a setter should be sufficient:

public class Example{ 

private long id=0;  

   public Example(long id)  
   {  
       this.id=id;
   }    

public long getId()  
{  
     return this.id;
}  

if this is insufficient and you want someone to be able to modify it X times you can do this:

public class Example  
{  
    ...  
    private final int MAX_CHANGES = 1;  
    private int changes = 0;    

     public void setId(long id) throws Exception {
        validateExample(); 
        changes++; 
        if ( this.id == 0 ) {
            this.id = id;
        } else {
            throw new Exception("Can't change id once set");
        }
    }

    private validateExample  
    {  
        if(MAX_CHANGES==change)  
        {  
             throw new IllegalStateException("Can no longer update this id");   
        }  
    }  
}  

This approach is akin to design by contract, wherein you validate the state of the object after a mutator (something that changes the state of the object) is invoked.

share|improve this answer
    
Answer does not fit the question. –  MrSmith42 Jan 3 '13 at 19:58
    
@Woot4Moo i did not downvote. still, i don't think the answer makes sense. the first snippet reinvents exactly the semantics of final without using the keyword. –  gefei Jan 3 '13 at 20:04
    
@gefei pretty sure final is there for a very specific reason, is it not the case that I can use reflection and modify a private variable that is not marked as final? I believe the answer to that is yes. –  Woot4Moo Jan 3 '13 at 20:06

I think the singleton pattern might be something you should look into. Google around a bit to check if this pattern meets your design goals.

Below is some sudo code on how to make a singleton in Java using enum. I think this is based off Joshua Bloch's design outlined in Effective Java, either way it's a book worth picking up if you don't have it yet.

public enum JavaObject {
    INSTANCE;

    public void doSomething(){
        System.out.println("Hello World!");
    }
}

Usage:

JavaObject.INSTANCE.doSomething();
share|improve this answer
2  
singleton is actually an anti-pattern. –  Woot4Moo Jan 3 '13 at 21:28
1  
does this answer the question? I don't think he is looking for singleton... –  Kent Jan 3 '13 at 22:58
    
I don't think singleton will help, as each instance of this object requires its own id, which will be set once. –  Richard Russell Jan 4 '13 at 9:26
1  
This seems completely off topic. –  djechlin Jun 11 '13 at 16:01

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