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Depending on a reply from a Scala Actor seems incredibly error-prone to me. Is this truly the idiomatic Scala way to have conversations between actors? Is there an alternative, or a safer use of reply that I'm missing?

(About me: I'm familiar with synchronization in Java, but I've never designed an actor-based system before and don't yet have a full understanding of the paradigm.)

Example mistakes

For a trivial demonstration, let's look at this silly integer-parsing Actor:

import actors._, Actor._

val a = actor {
  loop {
    react {
      case s: String => reply(s.toInt)
    }
  }
}

We could intend to use this as

scala> a !? "42"
res0: Any = 42

But if the actor fails to reply (in this case because a careless programmer did not think to catch NumberFormatException in the actor), we'll be waiting forever:

scala> a !? "f"

We also make a mistake at the call site. This next example also blocks indefinitely, because the actor does not reply to Int messages:

scala> a !? 42

Timeout

You could use !? (msec: Long, msg: Any) if the expected reply has some known reasonable time bound, but that is not the case in most circumstances I can think of.

Guaranteeing reply

One thought would be to design that actor such that it necessarily replies to every message:

import actors._, Actor._

val a = actor {
  loop {
    react {
      case m => reply { 
        try {
          m match {
            case s: String => reply(s.toInt)
            case _ => None
          }
        } catch {
          case e => e
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

This feels better, although there is still a little fear of accidentally invoking !? on an actor is no longer acting.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can see your concerns, but I would actually argue that this is not any worse than the synchronization you are used to. Who guarantees that the locks will ever be released again?

Using !? is at your own risk, so no there are no 'safer' uses that I am aware of. Threads can block or die and there is absolutely nothing we can do about it. Except for providing safety-valves that can soften the blow.

The event-based acting actually gives you alternatives to receiving replies synchronously. The timeout is one of them but another thing such as Futures via the !! method. They are designed to handle deadlocks such as that. The method immediately returns a future that can be handled later.

For inspiration and more in-depth design decisions see:

Actors: http://docs.scala-lang.org/overviews/core/actors.html

Futures (in scala 2.10): http://docs.scala-lang.org/sips/pending/futures-promises.html

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Don't bother with old local actors - learn Akka. Also it's good that you know about synchronized, but personally me - almost never use such a word, even in Java code. Imagine synchronized is deprecated, learn Java memory model, learn CAS.

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Using 'synchronised' and no other primitives, it's quite possible to accidentally write programs that deadlock. Because javadoc doesn't reveal when 'synchronised' is being used, it presents a coupling risk that could in principle be hard to mitigate, eg from calling a closed source api. So it's wise to be cautious with it. –  Rick-777 Jan 4 '13 at 9:36

I am not familiar with the Actor system in the Scala standard library myself, but I highly recommend checking out the Akka toolkit (http://akka.io/) which has "replaced" the Scala Actors and comes with the Scala distribution as of Scala 2.10.

In terms of Actor system design in general, some of the key ideas are asynchronous (non-blocking), isolated mutability, and communication via message passing. Each Actor encapsulates it's own state, nobody else is allowed to touch it. You can send an Actor a message that may "ask" it to change state, but the Actor implementation is free to ignore it. Messages are sent asynchronously (you CAN make it blocking, not recommended). If you want to have some sort of "response" (so that you can associate a message with a previously sent message), the Future API in Scala 2.10 and ask of Akka can help.

Regarding your error format exception and the problem in general, consider looking at the ask and Future API in Scala 2.10 and Akka 2.1. It will handle exceptions and is non-blocking.

Scala 2.10 also has a new Try that is intended as an alternative to the old-fashioned try-catch clauses. The Try has an apply method that you would use like any try (minus the catch and finally). Try has two sub-classes Success and Failure. An instance of Try[T] will have subclasses Success[T] and Failure[Throwable]. It is easier to explain by example:

>>> val x: Try[Int] = Try { "5".toInt } // Success[Int] with encapsulated value 5
>>> val y: Try[Int] = Try { "foo".toInt } // Failure(java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "foo")

Since Try does not throw the actual exception and the subclasses are conveniently case-classes, you could easily use the result as a message to an Actor.

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