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I have some UI elements that do some UI-specific work in code behind then update a binding in the data context.

WPF Elements:

    <TextBox Grid.Row="1"
             Text="{Binding PartNumber, UpdateSourceTrigger=Explicit}"
             Name="ui_partNumber"
             FontSize="35"
             VerticalContentAlignment="Center" />
    <Button Grid.Column="1"
            Grid.Row="1"
            Content="OK"
            Click="PartOKClick"
            FontSize="20"
            Width="150" />

Code behind:

/// <summary>
/// Handle updating the view model with the part number
/// </summary>
/// <param name="sender"></param>
/// <param name="e"></param>
private void PartOKClick(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {

  //Get the textbox's binding expression
  BindingExpression be = ui_partNumber.GetBindingExpression(TextBox.TextProperty);

  if (Condition) {
    //Update part number binding
    be.UpdateSource();

    //Animate to next state
    InAnimate(ui_partGrid.Name);
    OutAnimate(ui_whichPartNumber.Name);
  }
  else {
    //Discard the text in the textbox 
    be.UpdateTarget();

    //Animate to notification state
    InAnimate(ui_invalidLocation.Name);
  }
}

The property in my ViewModel looks like:

public string PartNumber{
    get { return _partNumber; }
    set { _partNumber = value; OnPropertyChanged("PartNumber"); }
}

I'm using explicit binding and only updating the source if things check out, otherwise I'm just reverting to the original binding.

The question is, is this the best way to work with the binding explicitly? If I'm getting the BindingExpression of 100 elements of varying types, do I need to do it by hand each time? Would I be able to do it in a more reusable way?

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3 Answers 3

If I understand correctly, you are willing to check the value entered in the TextBox and update the binding only if it is valid, right?

Well luckily, WPF has a built-in error handling process which is way cleaner that what you did there. You should read something about IDataErrorInfo

This article is pretty clear about how to use it

As an example in your case, you'd have something like this:

WPF Elements:

<TextBox Grid.Row="1"
         Text="{Binding PartNumber, ValidatesOnDataErrors=True}"
         Name="ui_partNumber"
         FontSize="35"
         VerticalContentAlignment="Center" />
<Button Grid.Column="1"
        Grid.Row="1"
        Content="OK"
        Click="PartOKClick"
        FontSize="20"
        Width="150" />

In your ViewModel, you should have this:

public string this[string columnName]
        {
            get
            {
                if (string.Equals(columnName, "PartNumber", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) || columnName == string.Empty)
                {
                    // Here, IDataErrorInfo is checking the property "PartNumber" bound to your TextBox
                    if (this.IsPartNumberValid(ui_partNumber.Text))
                    {
                        // Not valid: return any error message (string.Empty = no error, otherwise it will be seen as not valid)
                        return "Not valid!";
                    }
                }
                return string.Empty;
            }
        }

This should do the trick for you: if the string "Not valid!" is returned, the TextBox will be displayed with a red border and the Binding won't be updated

share|improve this answer
    
I've worked with IDataErrorInfo in the past, but it doesn't fit my application here. My example is simple, but sometimes I need to do more work in my code behind aside from doing some animations (which I realize I could do with data triggers in this case). I opted for explicit bindings because I needed some more liberty with validation and less "triggery" overhead I was experiencing with more strict MVVM. So my question is more regarding use of BindingExpression. +1 for the suggestion –  Doc Jan 3 '13 at 21:08
    
What needs would possibly prevent you from using a traditional IDataErrorInfo + Triggers ? Since you mention best practices, I believe using them is part of the best practices for this mater. Maybe your problem can be overcome using this, if you can add some code/details –  Damascus Jan 3 '13 at 21:43
    
IDataErrorInfo is fine and there's nothing preventing me from using it in this instance. My question isn't regarding data validation though, it's about explicitly updating a binding. Another simple example would be adding a confirmation UI element before updating the binding: "Are you sure you wish to foo?" Yes = update source, No = update target. –  Doc Jan 7 '13 at 19:16
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've come to the conclusion that since BindingExpressions are sort of an oddball feature and my use of them has been limited only to View-side behaviors (and there also do not seem to be a lot of resources available on best practices), that there really is no specific best practice for dealing with them. If someone believes otherwise, I'll consider selecting a new answer for this question.

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Why are you forced to use explicit binding? Why not do the validation in your ViewModel and then fire off an OnPropertyChanged("BindingParameter") only if you need an update?

Something like this (in VB):

Property prop as Object
  Get
   return _prop
  End Get 
  Set(ByVal value As Object)
    If your_validation_check(value) then
      _prop = value
      OnPropertyChanged("prop") 'INotifyPropertyChanged
    End If
  End Set 
End Property
share|improve this answer
    
Because I don't want the ViewModel to consume an update until the View is ready to send one. –  Doc Jan 23 '13 at 1:49
    
You could use a weak messaging system like in MVVM foundation and have a listener in your viewmodel which fires off the OnPropertyChanged event. –  Zach Leighton Jan 23 '13 at 3:49
    
I'm using MVVM. I'll revise my question so that's clear. –  Doc Jan 23 '13 at 13:43

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