Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently taking a beginner's class in c#. We missed 2 consecutive classes because the teacher couldn't be there. So we didn't really see what we needed to do this. He said to just go see on MSDN, but that is usually way too complicated for me. So here is my problem:

I have to create a "Simon Says" program. Here is my current code (sorry for the French variables):

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    const byte LIMITE = 255;
    const byte LIMITEBOUTON = 5;
    byte[] _abyBouton = new byte[LIMITE];
    Random _rand = new Random();


    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    //Blinks the Button. Works correctly.
    void AnimerBouton(Button btnBouton, Color Cocoleur)
    {
        btnBouton.BackColor = Color.Black;
        btnBouton.ForeColor = Color.White;
        Update();
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500); // C'est inscrit en miliseconde
        btnBouton.BackColor = Cocoleur;
        btnBouton.ForeColor = Color.Black;
        Update();
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500); // C'est inscrit en miliseconde
    }

    private void btnDémarrer_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //Creates an array with the 255 eventual moves.
        for (byte byIndex = 0; byIndex <= LIMITE - 1; byIndex++)
        {
            _abyBouton[byIndex] = (byte)_rand.Next(1, LIMITEBOUTON);
        }

        for (byte byIndex = 0; byIndex <= LIMITE - 1; byIndex++)
        {
            //Takes care of the current progress in the game.
            for (byte byIndex2 = 0; byIndex2 <= byIndex; byIndex2++)
            {
                switch (_abyBouton[byIndex2])
                {
                    case 1:
                        {
                            AnimerBouton(btn1, Color.Green);
                        }
                        break;
                    case 2:
                        {
                            AnimerBouton(btn2, Color.Red);
                        }
                        break;
                    case 3:
                        {
                            AnimerBouton(btn3, Color.Yellow);
                        }
                        break;
                    case 4:
                        {
                            AnimerBouton(btn4, Color.Cyan);
                        }
                        break;
                }
                //Wait to see if the click is correct. No idea how to do this.
            }
        }  
    }
}

So I have to wait for the user to click a button and see if it is the correct one. I looked around and it was talking about events, but I couldn't grasp what I needed to do. I would appreciate some help on how to do this.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In the designer, on the properties window, click the lightning bolt icon. You will get a list of events for the selected control. Make sure the btnBouton control is selected, and find the Click event in the list. You should see btnDemarrer_Click in the drop down list. Select it. Now when the button is clicked, it should call your btnDemarrer_Click handler.

When you have not already written a handler, you can double-click the event in the list, and it will generate the method skeleton for you automatically. You can also double-click the control itself to generate the default event handler for that control. (In the case of buttons, I think the default event is the click event.)

share|improve this answer
    
See image here: stackoverflow.com/a/1562785/880990 –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 3 '13 at 22:23

If you want a particular method to wait until some work is done, you could look into AutoResetEvent. An extremely simplified example might help you get on the right track:

using System.Threading;

public static AutoResetEvent arEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);

static void Main()
{
    DoWork();
    arEvent.WaitOne();  //WaitOne() "pauses" Main and waits for some work to be done.
    DoWork();
    arEvent.WaitOne();
}

static void DoWork();
{
    //Some work is done here.
    arEvent.Set(); //This lets Main() continue where it left off.
}

Using this, you could have btnDémarrer_Click wait for the user input then continue on after the user has done his clicking.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure how this applies to the question asked, and not sure it makes any sense, anyway. DoWork is running in the same thread as the calls to WaitOne. –  Andrew Barber Jan 3 '13 at 22:10
    
@AndrewBarber The question asks how to wait for a specific event (namely, a button click) to occur. The commented line at the bottom of his code is where he wants to wait for the user input. I'm assuming after the input is received, btnDémarrer_Click will continue and check the input against the correct answer. As for the example, it was extremely simplified to get the point across. :) –  Ichabod Clay Jan 3 '13 at 22:17
    
Probably the OP created the handler manually without subscribing the event. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 3 '13 at 22:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.