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Say i have the following:

import pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
'''array([[29, 13, 11,  4,  5], #dataMag
       [19, 16, 25,  9, 10],
       [16, 22, 14, 18, 26],
       [ 9, 17,  8,  9, 777]])

array([[205, 338, 380, 428, 228], #dataX
       [199, 546, 430,  95, 374], 
       [418,  85, 260, 236, 241],
       [308, 481, 133, 136,  83]])

array([[ 0.48,  0.83,  0.71,  0.12,  0.],   #dataY
       [ 0.09,  0.  ,  0.7 ,  0.43,  0.54],
       [ 0.58,  0.  ,  0.56,  0.18,  0.25],
       [ 0.96,  0.26,  0.57,  0.  ,  0.82])'''

plt.scatter(x=dataX.flat, y=dataY.flat, c=dataMag.flat, vmin=np.min(dataMag),
            vmax=np.max(dataMag), marker='s', cmap='hot')
plt.show()

which gives me the following result: random generated image

Instead of using three arrays to get a 2D image, is Is there a way in Numpy (or Scipy, etc.) to represent them as an (a,b) 2D array?

share|improve this question
    
What do you want the structure of that array to be? Are you saying you want a 2D array with 1s where there would be dots and 0s where there are no dots, or what? –  BrenBarn Jan 3 '13 at 21:39
    
I don't see how you want to transform those three arrays in a single 2d array, but you can easily get a 3d array. Consider your arrays are named mag, x, and y, then allthem = dstack((x.ravel(), y.ravel(), mag.ravel())) and scatter(x=allthem[..., 0], y=allthem[..., 1], c=allthem[..., 2]). –  mmgp Jan 3 '13 at 21:46
    
It would be an array, say NewArray, with each axis [i,j] being the ordered points from dataX, dataYmade up of the corresponding magnitudes from dataMag. Here's a visual (also asked by me to no avail). –  Noob Saibot Jan 3 '13 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT I am keeping my original answer below, but digging into your previous question on the same subject, code doing what you are after follows. Note that it doesn't handle repeated values, so if you have more than one value assigned to a same location, only one of them will be preserved. Also, this messes up the scale of your scatter plot, so something like my original answer may be more suited for what you are after. But any way, here's the code:

x_, x_idx = np.unique(np.ravel(dataX), return_inverse=True)
y_, y_idx = np.unique(np.ravel(dataY), return_inverse=True)
newArray = np.zeros((len(x_), len(y_)), dtype=dataMag.dtype)
newArray[x_idx, y_idx] = np.ravel(dataMag)
>>> newArray
array([[  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0, 777,   0,   0],
       [ 22,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   9,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   8,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  9,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,  19,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  29,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  5,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,  18,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,  26,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  14,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   9],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  13,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  10,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  11,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  16,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   4,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  25,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  17,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [ 16,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0]])

ORIGINAL ANSWER

If dataX and dataY where both integer arrays, the implementation would be pretty straight forward. But since they don't seem to necessarily be, you will need to do some rounding, for which you will want to first choose a step size for your array in each direction, and you can then do something like this:

from __future__ import division

x_step, y_step = 25, 0.10
x = np.round(dataX / x_step).astype(int)
y = np.round(dataY / y_step).astype(int)
x_m, x_M = np.min(x), np.max(x)
y_m, y_M = np.min(y), np.max(y)
newArray = np.zeros((x_M - x_m + 1, y_M - y_m + 1), dtype=dataMag.dtype)
newArray[x - x_m, y - y_m] = dataMag

>>> newArray
array([[ 22,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0, 777,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   9,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  9,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   8,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,  19,   0,   0,   0,  29,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  5,   0,  18,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,  26,   0,   0,   0,  14,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   9],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  13,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  10,   0,  11,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   4,   0,   0,   0,   0,  16,  25,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,  17,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [ 16,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0]])

You have to be careful, when doing this, with making sure your rounding step is small enough so that no two values round off to the same position in the array, as then you would lose information. For example:

x_step, y_step = 50, 0.10
...
>>> newArray
array([[ 22,   0,   0,   0,   9,   0,   0,   0, 777,   0,   0],
       [  9,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   8,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,  19,   0,   0,   0,  29,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  5,   0,  26,   0,   0,   0,  14,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   9],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  10,   0,   0,  13,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  16,  11,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   4,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,  25,   0,   0,   0],
       [  0,   0,   0,  17,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0],
       [ 16,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0,   0]])

and in position [3, 2] only a 26 shows up, instead of the 18 and 26 in the corresponding cells of the previous example.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm...I sincerely appreciate your help, but i don't think that's what i'm looking for. For example: for dataMag[3,4]=777, the value should be re-mapped to newArray[0,14] since dataX[3,4]=83 (the first sorted element in dataX), and dataY[3,4]=0.82 (the 14th sorted element in dataY including 0). Could you explain yours a bit. What is __future__? –  Noob Saibot Jan 4 '13 at 0:27
1  
@NoobSaibot I made an edit to my answer after reading your previous question, it now does what you are after, although I have trouble figuring out why would you want that as an array version of a scatter plot, but that is none of my business. The from __future__ import division is to avoid division of integers being rounded down, e.g. without that import 3 / 2 == 1 and with it 3 / 2 = 1.5. –  Jaime Jan 4 '13 at 0:34
    
My God...I'm free! Thank you so much. My days of fighting with this stupid problem are over and i can finally progress! –  Noob Saibot Jan 4 '13 at 0:42
    
And to indulge your curiosity, plotting is just one of the functions i need for my data. For the others, a 2D array is necessary. –  Noob Saibot Jan 4 '13 at 1:17

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