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I want to take an existing enum and add more elements to it as follows:

enum A {a,b,c}

enum B extends A {d}

/*B is {a,b,c,d}*/

Is this possible in Java?

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1  
A reason to do this is for testing the situation where there is an invalid enum value without introducing an invalid enum value in the core source. –  Archimedes Trajano Jan 31 '13 at 8:34
    
Yes an example of "linguistic" purity. I think what is desired is for the "bookeeping" labor saving idea of an auto incrementing set of integers like one has in C++ so you can start a new set as an extension of the old set starting at the 1+ the last value of the prior set, and if the entries are named inherit the names from the "common subset". Though the java enum has some nice things about it, it lacks the simple automated auto-incrementing integer declaring help that C++ enum provides. –  peterk Feb 22 '13 at 22:06

10 Answers 10

up vote 150 down vote accepted

No, you can't do this in Java. Aside from anything else, d would then presumably be an instance of A (given the normal idea of "extends"), but users who only knew about A wouldn't know about it - which defeats the point of an enum being a well-known set of values.

If you could tell us more about how you want to use this, we could potentially suggest alternative solutions.

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181  
All enums implicitly extend java.lang.Enum. Since Java does not support multiple inheritance, an enum cannot extend anything else. –  givanse Oct 23 '10 at 22:12
5  
The reason I want to extend is because I'd like to have a base class called e.g. IntEnum, that looks like this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1681976/enum-with-int-value-in-java/…. Then all my enums could extend it...in this case just benefitting from inheritance and thus I wouldn't have to duplicate this "int-based enum" code frequently. I am new to Java and coming from C#, and I'm hoping I'm missing something. My current opinion is that Java enums are a pain in comparison to C#. –  Tyler Collier Nov 13 '10 at 4:41
12  
@Tyler: C# enums are just names associated with numbers, with no automatic validation or anything. IMO enums are the one bit of Java which is actually better than C#. –  Jon Skeet Nov 13 '10 at 13:21
8  
Not agreing with @JonSkeet here. In my use case, I would like to separate all the nasty logic in my big enum, and have the logic hidden away, and define a clean enum that extends the other one that is hidden. Enums with lots of logic beats the idea of having clean variables declared so you do not have to declare hundreds of static strings variables so a class with 5 enums dont get unreadable and too big in lines. I do not want the other developers to be concerned with copying and pasting that peace of code for the next project either and instead extend the base_enum ... it makes sense to me... –  SecretService Apr 11 '12 at 11:12
7  
@givanse... not agreeing with you on the point of implicit extension of java.lang.Enum being the cause of non-inheritance as every class in java also implicitly inherits Object class yet it can inherit some other class as it would then come into the hierarchy as Object->A->B instead of Object->A->B extends Object –  mickeymoon Apr 27 '13 at 22:23

Enums represent a complete enumeration of possible values. So the (unhelpful) answer is no.

As an example of a real problem take weekdays, weekend days and, the union, days of week. We could define all days within days-of-week but then we would not be able to represent properties special to either weekdays and weekend-days.

What we could do, is have three enum types with a mapping between weekdays/weekend-days and days-of-week.

public enum Weekday {
    MON, TUE, WED, THU, FRI;
    public DayOfWeek toDayOfWeek() { ... }
}
public enum WeekendDay {
    SAT, SUN;
    public DayOfWeek toDayOfWeek() { ... }
}
public enum DayOfWeek {
    MON, TUE, WED, THU, FRI, SAT, SUN;
}

Alternatively, we could have an open-ended interface for day-of-week:

interface Day {
    ...
}
public enum Weekday implements Day {
    MON, TUE, WED, THU, FRI;
}
public enum WeekendDay implements Day {
    SAT, SUN;
}

Or we could combine the two approaches:

interface Day {
    ...
}
public enum Weekday implements Day {
    MON, TUE, WED, THU, FRI;
    public DayOfWeek toDayOfWeek() { ... }
}
public enum WeekendDay implements Day {
    SAT, SUN;
    public DayOfWeek toDayOfWeek() { ... }
}
public enum DayOfWeek {
    MON, TUE, WED, THU, FRI, SAT, SUN;
    public Day toDay() { ... }
}
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8  
Isn't there a problem with this? A switch statement won't work on an interface, but it works on a regular enum. Not working w/switch kind of kills one of the nicer things about enums. –  Crusader Jul 29 '11 at 5:23
1  
@Crusader With the second approach, yeah you'd have to use an if-else chain or something. With the first approach there is no interface. With the third, you'd need to call toDayOfWeek if you have a Day reference. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jul 29 '11 at 10:30
4  
I'm thinking there might be another problem with this. There is no equality between the Weekday.MON and DayOfWeek.MON. Isn't that the other big benefit of enums? I don't have a better solution, just realizing this as I'm trying to find the best answer. The lack of being able to use == forces the hand a bit. –  Snekse Nov 22 '11 at 16:57
    
@Snekse There is certainly an issue that the compiler wont (currently don't watn - I guess it could be added) if you accidentally compare a Weekday to DayOfWeek.MON, or similar using Object.equals, Map.get, List.indexOf, etc. (See smallwig.blogspot.co.uk/2007/12/… ) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 30 '12 at 12:29
2  
Going from enum to interface, you also lose the static call to values(). This makes refactoring hard, especially if you decide to extend your enum and add the interface as an abstraction barrier to an established enum. –  Joshua Goldberg May 1 '13 at 16:56

The recommended solution to this is the extensible enum pattern.

This involves creating an interface and using that where you currently use the enum. Then make the enum implement the interface. You can add more constants by making that new enum also extend the interface.

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enum A {a,b,c}
enum B extends A {d}
/*B is {a,b,c,d}*/

can be written as:

public enum All {
    a       (ClassGroup.A,ClassGroup.B),
    b       (ClassGroup.A,ClassGroup.B),
    c       (ClassGroup.A,ClassGroup.B),
    d       (ClassGroup.B) 
...
  • ClassGroup.B.getMembers() contains {a,b,c,d}

How it can be useful: Let say we want something like: We have events and we are using enums. Those enums can be grouped by similar processing. If we have operation with many elements, then some events starts operation, some are just step and other end the operation. To gather such operation and avoid long switch case we can group them as in example and use:

if(myEvent.is(State_StatusGroup.START)) makeNewOperationObject()..
if(myEnum.is(State_StatusGroup.STEP)) makeSomeSeriousChanges()..
if(myEnum.is(State_StatusGroup.FINISH)) closeTransactionOrSomething()..

I wrote something interesting example but I'm not sure of it's disadvantages:

public enum AtmOperationStatus {
STARTED_BY_SERVER       (State_StatusGroup.START),
SUCCESS             (State_StatusGroup.FINISH),
FAIL_TOKEN_TIMEOUT      (State_StatusGroup.FAIL, 
                    State_StatusGroup.FINISH),
FAIL_NOT_COMPLETE       (State_StatusGroup.FAIL,
                    State_StatusGroup.STEP),
FAIL_UNKNOWN            (State_StatusGroup.FAIL,
                    State_StatusGroup.FINISH),
(...)

private AtmOperationStatus(StatusGroupInterface ... pList){
    for (StatusGroupInterface group : pList){
        group.addMember(this);
    }
}
public boolean is(StatusGroupInterface with){
    for (AtmOperationStatus eT : with.getMembers()){
        if( eT .equals(this))   return true;
    }
    return false;
}
// Each group must implement this interface
private interface StatusGroupInterface{
    EnumSet<AtmOperationStatus> getMembers();
    void addMember(AtmOperationStatus pE);
}
// DEFINING GROUPS
public enum State_StatusGroup implements StatusGroupInterface{
    START, STEP, FAIL, FINISH;

    private List<AtmOperationStatus> members = new LinkedList<AtmOperationStatus>();

    @Override
    public EnumSet<AtmOperationStatus> getMembers() {
        return EnumSet.copyOf(members);
    }

    @Override
    public void addMember(AtmOperationStatus pE) {
        members.add(pE);
    }
    static { // forcing initiation of dependent enum
        try {
            Class.forName(AtmOperationStatus.class.getName()); 
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException ex) { 
            throw new RuntimeException("Class AtmEventType not found", ex); 
        }
    }
}
}
//Some use of upper code:
if (p.getStatus().is(AtmOperationStatus.State_StatusGroup.FINISH)) {
    //do something
}else if (p.getStatus().is(AtmOperationStatus.State_StatusGroup.START)) {
    //do something      
}  

Add some more advanced:

public enum AtmEventType {

USER_DEPOSIT        (Status_EventsGroup.WITH_STATUS,
              Authorization_EventsGroup.USER_AUTHORIZED,
              ChangedMoneyAccountState_EventsGroup.CHANGED,
              OperationType_EventsGroup.DEPOSIT,
              ApplyTo_EventsGroup.CHANNEL),
SERVICE_DEPOSIT     (Status_EventsGroup.WITH_STATUS,
              Authorization_EventsGroup.TERMINAL_AUTHORIZATION,
              ChangedMoneyAccountState_EventsGroup.CHANGED,
              OperationType_EventsGroup.DEPOSIT,
              ApplyTo_EventsGroup.CHANNEL),
DEVICE_MALFUNCTION  (Status_EventsGroup.WITHOUT_STATUS,
              Authorization_EventsGroup.TERMINAL_AUTHORIZATION,
              ChangedMoneyAccountState_EventsGroup.DID_NOT_CHANGED,
              ApplyTo_EventsGroup.DEVICE),
CONFIGURATION_4_C_CHANGED(Status_EventsGroup.WITHOUT_STATUS,
              ApplyTo_EventsGroup.TERMINAL,
              ChangedMoneyAccountState_EventsGroup.DID_NOT_CHANGED),
(...)

At above if we have some fail (myEvent.is(State_StatusGroup.FAIL)) then iterating by previous events we can easily check if we must revert money transfer by:

if(myEvent2.is(ChangedMoneyAccountState_EventsGroup.CHANGED)) rollBack()..

It can be useful for:

  1. including explicite meta-data about processing logic, less to remember
  2. implementing some of multi-inheritance
  3. we don't want to use class structures, ex. for sending short status messages
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Under the covers your ENUM is just a regular class generated by the compiler. That generated class extends java.lang.Enum. The technical reason you can't extend the generated class is that the generated class is final. The conceptual reasons for it being final are discussed in this topic. But I'll add the mechanics to the discussion.

Here is a test enum:

public enum TEST {  
    ONE, TWO, THREE;
}

The resulting code from javap:

public final class TEST extends java.lang.Enum<TEST> {
  public static final TEST ONE;
  public static final TEST TWO;
  public static final TEST THREE;
  static {};
  public static TEST[] values();
  public static TEST valueOf(java.lang.String);
}

Conceivably you could type this class on your own and drop the "final". But the compiler prevents you from extending "java.lang.Enum" directly. You could decide NOT to extend java.lang.Enum, but then your class and its derived classes would not be an instanceof java.lang.Enum ... which might not really matter to you any way!

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Good article here: Creating Java Enum Objects at Runtime

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In what way 'good'? It seems to confuse increasing the extension of a closed set with the Java 'extends' keyword which denotes a restriction of the extension. –  Pete Kirkham Sep 12 '09 at 10:12
3  
I think he meant 'good' in terms of getting the OP what they wanted. Whether what the OP wants is a good thing or not is certainly up for debate (and I think that most of us would land on the 'not' side of that issue) - but the article does show a way to add values to an enum when one absolutely have to. That said, I shudder to think about the testing that must be done to make sure that it really works, regardless of JVM, etc... –  Kevin Day Sep 14 '09 at 5:43

This is how I enhance the enum inheritance pattern with runtime check in static initializer. The BaseKind#checkEnumExtender checks that "extending" enum declares all the values of the base enum in exactly the same way so #name() and #ordinal() remain fully compatible.

There is still copy-paste involved for declaring values but the program fails fast if somebody added or modified a value in the base class without updating extending ones.

Common behavior for different enums extending each other:

public interface Kind {
  /**
   * Let's say we want some additional member.
   */
  String description() ;

  /**
   * Standard {@code Enum} method.
   */
  String name() ;

  /**
   * Standard {@code Enum} method.
   */
  int ordinal() ;
}

Base enum, with verifying method:

public enum BaseKind implements Kind {

  FIRST( "First" ),
  SECOND( "Second" ),

  ;

  private final String description ;

  public String description() {
    return description ;
  }

  private BaseKind( final String description ) {
    this.description = description ;
  }

  public static void checkEnumExtender(
      final Kind[] baseValues,
      final Kind[] extendingValues
  ) {
    if( extendingValues.length < baseValues.length ) {
      throw new IncorrectExtensionError( "Only " + extendingValues.length + " values against "
          + baseValues.length + " base values" ) ;
    }
    for( int i = 0 ; i < baseValues.length ; i ++ ) {
      final Kind baseValue = baseValues[ i ] ;
      final Kind extendingValue = extendingValues[ i ] ;
      if( baseValue.ordinal() != extendingValue.ordinal() ) {
        throw new IncorrectExtensionError( "Base ordinal " + baseValue.ordinal()
            + " doesn't match with " + extendingValue.ordinal() ) ;
      }
      if( ! baseValue.name().equals( extendingValue.name() ) ) {
        throw new IncorrectExtensionError( "Base name[ " + i + "] " + baseValue.name()
            + " doesn't match with " + extendingValue.name() ) ;
      }
      if( ! baseValue.description().equals( extendingValue.description() ) ) {
        throw new IncorrectExtensionError( "Description[ " + i + "] " + baseValue.description()
            + " doesn't match with " + extendingValue.description() ) ;
      }
    }
  }


  public static class IncorrectExtensionError extends Error {
    public IncorrectExtensionError( final String s ) {
      super( s ) ;
    }
  }

}

Extension sample:

public enum ExtendingKind implements Kind {
  FIRST( BaseKind.FIRST ),
  SECOND( BaseKind.SECOND ),
  THIRD( "Third" ),
  ;

  private final String description ;

  public String description() {
    return description ;
  }

  ExtendingKind( final BaseKind baseKind ) {
    this.description = baseKind.description() ;
  }

  ExtendingKind( final String description ) {
    this.description = description ;
  }

}
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Having had this same problem myself I'd like to post my perspective. I think that there are a couple motivating factors for doing something like this:

  • You want to have some related enum codes, but in different classes. In my case I had a base class with several codes defined in an associated enum. At some later date (today!) I wanted to provide some new functionality to the base class, which also meant new codes for the enum.
  • The derived class would support both the base classes' enum as well as its own. No duplicate enum values! So: how to have an enum for the subclass that includes the enum's of its parent along with its new values.

Using an interface doesn't really cut it: you can accidentally get duplicate enum values. Not desirable.

I ended up just combining the enums: this ensures that there cannot be any duplicate values, at the expense of being less tightly tied to its associated class. But, I figured the duplicate issue was my main concern...

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In case you missed it, there's a chapter in the excellent Joshua Bloch's book "Java Effective, 2nd edition".

  • Chapter 6 - Enums and Annotations
    • Item 34 : Emulate extensible enums with interfaces

Extract here.

Just the conclusion :

A minor disadvantage of the use of interfaces to emulate extensible enums is that implementations cannot be inherited from one enum type to another. In the case of our Operation example, the logic to store and retrieve the symbol associated with an operation is duplicated in BasicOperation and ExtendedOperation. In this case it doesn’t matter because very little code is duplicated. If there were a larger amount of shared functionality, you could encapsulate it in a helper class or a static helper method to eliminate the code duplication.

In summary, while you cannot write an extensible enum type, you can emulate it by writing an interface to go with a basic enum type that implements the interface. This allows clients to write their own enums that implement the interface. These enums can then be used wherever the basic enum type can be used, assuming APIs are written in terms of the interface.

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I tend to avoid enums, because they are not extensible. To stay with the example of the OP, if A is in a library and B in your own code, you can't extend A if it is an enum. This is how I sometimes replace enums:

// access like enum: A.a
public class A {
    public static final A a = new A();
    public static final A b = new A();
    public static final A c = new A();
/*
 * In case you need to identify your constant
 * in different JVMs, you need an id. This is the case if
 * your object is transfered between
 * different JVM instances (eg. save/load, or network).
 * Also, switch statements don't work with
 * Objects, but work with int.
 */
    public static int maxId=0;
    public int id = maxId++;
    public int getId() { return id; }
}

public class B extends A {
/*
 * good: you can do like
 * A x = getYourEnumFromSomeWhere();
 * if(x instanceof B) ...;
 * to identify which enum x
 * is of.
 */
    public static final A d = new A();
}

public class C extends A {
/* Good: e.getId() != d.getId()
 * Bad: in different JVMs, C and B
 * might be initialized in different order,
 * resulting in different IDs.
 * Workaround: use a fixed int, or hash code.
 */
    public static final A e = new A();
    public int getId() { return -32489132; };
}

There are some pits to avoid, see the comments in the code. Depending on your needs, this is a solid, extensible alternative to enums.

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