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I have a class that accesses the address book, if I have the following code then I get warnings from the analyzer, one is for a leak in the init method and another is saying the class doesn't own the object when its releasing it in the dealloc.

I presume the 2nd warning is due to declaring the address book ref as assign? But its not possible to make it strong as this generates a compilation warning. What is the correct way of dealing with the address book as a property?

@property (assign, nonatomic)   ABAddressBookRef                addressBook;

..
- (id) init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self)
    {
        if (ABAddressBookCreateWithOptions)
        {
            // iOS 6 onwards
            self.addressBook = ABAddressBookCreateWithOptions(NULL, NULL);
        }
        else
        {
            // < iOS 6
            self.addressBook = ABAddressBookCreate();
        }
    }
    return self;
}


- (void) dealloc
{
    if (self.addressBook)
    {
        CFRelease(self.addressBook);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Any reason you're not going with automatic retain count? – zneak Jan 3 '13 at 21:56
    
No,but this is core foundation. How do you use ARC with address book? – Chromium Dioxide Jan 3 '13 at 21:58
    
@zneak ARC does not work with Core Foundation, which address book is written in. – Simon Goldeen Jan 3 '13 at 21:59
    
No, you're right. You're using it anyways, in fact. For a moment I thought dealloc is completely forbidden with ARC, but that's obviously not true. – zneak Jan 3 '13 at 22:02
    
@Mungbeans they might be, but they might not. Could you write some code to create and destroy several of these objects and then run it with the leaks tool to see if you leak any? Another option could be to make the ABAddressBookRef an instance variable of your class rather than a property and see if that works. – Simon Goldeen Jan 3 '13 at 22:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's a false positive, you are correctly balancing the initial +1 of the retainCount with a the CFRelease call in the dealloc method.

You can get rid of the warnings by using the ivar instead of the property to initialize and release the pointer.

- (id) init {
    // ...
    _addressBook = ABAddressBookCreateWithOptions(NULL, NULL);
    //...
}

- (void)dealloc { 
    CFRelease(_addressBook); //assuming that _addressBook is your synthesized ivar
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doh, I didn't notice I wasn't following the convention - I also changed the init to reference _accessBook and both warnings have now gone. – Chromium Dioxide Jan 3 '13 at 22:15
    
Yeah I just find out the same thing and I was about to tell you that :) I'll edit my post for completeness. – Gabriele Petronella Jan 3 '13 at 22:17

It's technically true that you don't own the address book because assign properties aren't supposed to be owning references. A client of your class could overwrite the address book reference and you'd leak it.

One way to fix it completely would be to have an explicitly declared field for your address book and make a read-only property to it, then only deal with the field from inside your class, instead of the property. Since read-only properties can't be assigned, there is no questioning about whether they're owning references or not.

I'm not in front of my Mac, so I can't test this, but it could also be possible to use a retained property even though this is not an Objective-C object. A lot of Core Foundation objects start with an Objective-C header and respond to several NSObject methods. If you can't make it work with @synthesize, I'd think you could manually implement the methods yourself anyways without complaints from the compiler.

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Here is the solution I use

@synthesize addressBook = _addressBook;
- (ABAddressBookRef)addressBook{
    if (_addressBook == nil){
        if (ABAddressBookCreateWithOptions != NULL){
            _addressBook = ABAddressBookCreateWithOptions(NULL, NULL);
        }
        else {
#pragma GCC diagnostic push
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wdeprecated"
            _addressBook = ABAddressBookCreate();
#pragma GCC diagnostic pop
        }

        if (![self requestAddressBookAuthorizationWithAddressBook:_addressBook]){
            _addressBook = nil;
        }

    }
    return _addressBook;
}
- (void)setAddressBook:(ABAddressBookRef)addressBook{
    if (_addressBook != addressBook){
        if (_addressBook != nil){
            CFRelease(_addressBook);
        }

        _addressBook = nil;

        if ([self requestAddressBookAuthorizationWithAddressBook:addressBook]){
            _addressBook = addressBook;
        }
        if (_addressBook != nil){
            CFRetain(_addressBook);
        }
    }
}

at this point you can set the property to nil and the setter will handle getting rid of the retain

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