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I'm doing some practice problems to refresh on my old algorithms course, and I'm trying to implement quicksort. Yes, I know in production code we should use std::sort, but this is for educational purposes :)

I have the code below. It works when all of the elements in the array are unique, but not when there are duplicate elements. How come? Where have I faltered?

void quicksort(int arr[], int left, int right)
{
    // base case:
    if (left >= right)
        return;

    // alternative case:
    int pivot_index = (left + right)/2;
    int pivot = arr[pivot_index];

    int i = left, j = right;
    int tmp;

    while (i < j)
    {
        // scan from left until elem > pivot or left == right, 
        while (arr[i] < pivot)
            ++i;

        // scan from right until elem < pivot or right == left.
        while (arr[j] > pivot)
            --j;

        if (i < j)
        {
            tmp = arr[i];
            arr[i] = arr[j];
            arr[j] = tmp;
            ++i;
            --j;
        }
    }
    // recurse on left and right.
    if (i > left)
        quicksort(arr, left, i);
    if (i < right)
        quicksort(arr, i + 1, right);
}

void main()
{
    const int arr_size = 7;
    int arr[arr_size] = {1,2,4,3,9,5,2};
    quicksort(arr, 0, arr_size - 1);

    for (int i = 0; i < arr_size; ++i)
    {
        std::cout << arr[i] << ", ";
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Doesn't work how? –  djechlin Jan 3 '13 at 22:18
    
stack overflow from the quicksort recursive calls –  Jim Jan 3 '13 at 22:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
if (i > left)
    quicksort(arr, left, i);
if (i < right)
    quicksort(arr, i + 1, right);

Suppose you have an array of two equal elements. Then i == right, and you sort exactly the same array again and again, and again...

When your array contains multiple elements, that is very likely to happen at some point.

Another point of failure for repeated elements is exemplified by

int arr[5] = { 4, 8, 4, 5, 6 };

The pivot is the 4 at index 2, after the first scans i == 0 and j == 2, the two 4s are swapped, i is incremented, j decremented, so now i == j == 1, and the loop stops.

The recursive calls then sort { 4, 8 } resp { 4, 5, 6}, and the result is not sorted correctly.

You can avoid that problem by replacing at least one of the scan conditions with arr[i] <= pivot resp. arr[j] >= pivot, but then you need to guard against running off the array (when the pivot is the largest or smallest element), best by including the condition i < j there.

If you in- resp. decrement the indices upon swapping,

if (i < j)
{
    tmp = arr[i];
    arr[i] = arr[j];
    arr[j] = tmp;
    ++i;
    --j;
}

you always have the problem that the last swap may occur in a situation

... x y z ...
    ^   ^
    i   j

leading to i == j pointing to y, and you have no information about how y compares to the pivot.

So then you need to inspect y and handle the different possibilities.

But your implementation also is notcorrect without repeated elements; consider

{ 1, 4, 5, 6, 9, 3, 2 }
           ^
         pivot

First, i is incremented until it points at the pivot, j stays pointing at the 2. These two are swapped, i is incremented, j decremented, so now the situation has become

{ 1, 4, 5, 2, 9, 3, 6 }
              ^  ^
              i  j

arr[i] > pivot, and arr[j] < pivot, so swap, increment i, decrement j:

{ 1, 4, 5, 2, 3, 9, 6 }
              ^  ^
              j  i

Now j < i, so the loop stops, but the recursive calls are to quicksort(arr, 0, 5); and quicksort(arr, 6, 6);, so the last element in the "sorted" array is not the largest element in the array.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! Very interesting. So does the problem lay in the increment/decrement pairing in the if (i < j) conditional statement, or am I using the wrong condition to recurse, hmm. –  Jim Jan 3 '13 at 22:31
    
Well, I'm used to swapping the pivot out of the way first, and then swapping it to its final position before recurring to sort [left, pivot_pos-1] and [pivot_pos+1,right]. Not sure how to fix it without swapping the pivot out of the way first. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 3 '13 at 22:37

You don't have a fallback if left == right. If you don't have a catch the code will not execute anything.

share|improve this answer
    
If you run this program, that's not what happens. It's actually recursing infinitely. –  templatetypedef Jan 3 '13 at 22:20
    
That's the very first portion of the quicksort method, the base case. –  Jim Jan 3 '13 at 22:21
    
Oh, sorry I missed that. –  user1943931 Jan 3 '13 at 22:25

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