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Is anyone using the GCC 4.4.0 C++0x support in production? I'm thinking about using it with the latest MinGW, but I'm not sure if it's mature enough.

I'm interested in:

  • TR1 support
  • auto
  • initializer lists
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TR1 support should be safe, as it predates C++0x. Auto seems fairly harmless as well. Even if there are bugs in its implementation, they'd most likely manifest as easy-to-fix type errors, rather than bugs at runtime. –  jalf Sep 12 '09 at 11:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

IMHO, TR1 support and auto are safe to use. In the case of auto it was one of the first features to be included into the standard and is a relatively small change to the language. I would therefore have no problem using it.

I would be a bit more hesitant about using initializer lists. On some other forums (eg. comp.lang.c++.moderated) there are questions about their behaviour and its possible that they may change closer to the release of the standard.

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I'm not using GCC 4.4.0 C++0x support in production but I'm using the TR1 features with the help of the Boost Library http://www.boost.org/.

The Boost Library is well tested and often used in production environments. If you convert to the C++0x standard later the only thing you have to do is changing your include Directives http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1%5F40%5F0/doc/html/boost%5Ftr1.html.

In my opinion it's currently better to use the Boost Library until the standard is finished. It's a much more compiler independent way.

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MinGW simply won't compile with '-std=c++0x'. Strange enough, '-std=gnu++0x' works. Anyway it seems buggy and I won't count on it.

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I'll take a guess - the error is due to missing wide-character functions like vwsprintf, right? That occurs with -std=c++98 or -ansi as well, it's a well known MinGW bug. Nothing C++0x specific. –  Jack Lloyd Jan 5 '10 at 21:16

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